This question already has an answer here:

Consider the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
#define A -B
#define B -C
#define C 5

int main()
{
  printf("The value of A is %d\n", A); 
  return 0;
}

Here preprocessing should take place in the following manner:

  1. first A should get replaced with -B
  2. then B should get replaced with -C thus expression resulting into --C
  3. then C should get replaced with 5 thus expression resulting into --5

So the resultant expression should give a compilation error( lvalue error ). But the correct answer is 5, how can the output be 5?

Please help me in this.

marked as duplicate by Bo Persson, MSalters c Oct 14 '17 at 22:46

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  • 1
    MSVC gives compiler error C2105: '--' needs l-value. – Weather Vane Oct 14 '17 at 15:24
  • 2
    Works for me with gcc 5.3.0 – tpr Oct 14 '17 at 15:27
  • 2
    This is an issue that is compiler-dependent. Some compilers will replace A with - - 5. Which is negating 5 twice. – Some programmer dude Oct 14 '17 at 15:27
  • literally the same code. Where is this from? – MSalters Oct 14 '17 at 22:47

It preprocesses to (note the space):

int main()
{
  printf("The value of A is %d\n", - -5);
  return 0;
}

The preprocessor pastes tokens, not strings. It won't create -- out of two adjacent - tokens unless you force token concatenation with ##:

#define CAT_(A,B) A##B
#define CAT(A,B) CAT_(A,B)

#define A CAT(-,B)

#define B -C
#define C 5

int main()
{
  printf("The value of A is %d\n", A); /* A is --5 here—no space */ 
  return 0;
}
  • printf("The value of A is %d\n", - -5); Why should even this compile? -<space>-5 , how this can be valid expression? – Rishab Shinghal Oct 14 '17 at 16:10
  • 2
    @user3290550 The C grammar will simply interpret it as -(-(5)). It gets parsed just fine. – PSkocik Oct 14 '17 at 16:17
  • I tried following program: #define A *B #define B *C #define C 5 #include <stdio.h> int main() { printf("%d\n",A); } In this , preprocessed code is having **5 , no space in between. Why this special behaviour is only with '-' – Rishab Shinghal Oct 14 '17 at 17:32
  • 1
    @user3290550 ** is not a token, so the preprocessor doesn't have to insert the space to protect adjacently pasted * from accidentally merging. In a full-fledged run (combined with the compiler), the tokens will usually go straight to the compiler, so this space insertion is really just for the sake of isolated preprocessor runs. – PSkocik Oct 14 '17 at 17:37
  • 2
    This is just an artefact of gcc, which postprocesses the preprocessed token stream in order to create a text stream which can then be fed back into the compiler. The preprocessor itself (translation phase 4) produces a list of tokens to be fed into the following translation phases. (Technically it produces a stream of tokens and whitespace but the whitespace is not significant abd us almost immediately discarded.) – rici Oct 14 '17 at 17:44

Although the C preprocessor often feels like it’s literally doing a search and replace on the code, the preprocessor actually works a bit differently.

Before the preprocessor runs, the source file is split into preprocessing tokens, which are individual units of text. For example, a single minus sign is treated not as a character, but as a token consisting of a minus sign, and a double minus sign is treated as a token consisting of two minus sign.

The C preprocessor kicks in and replaces each macro not with the literal text of the macro replacement, but rather with the series of preprocessor tokens in that replacement. In this case, the preprocessor replaces A with a minus followed by B, then replaces B with a minus followed by C, then replaces C with 5. The effect here is that there are two unary minuses applied to the 5, rather than a decrement operator, even though a literal search and replace would have generated a decrement operator that produces a syntax error.

This is interesting in that there’s no way you can write two consecutive minus signs in source code and have it interpreted as two unary minuses. This only works because by the time the preprocessor splices everything together, it already knows it’s looking at two unary minuses. The resulting C code isn’t then rescanned to be tokenized a second time around.

Now the legalese: section §5.1.1.2/7 says that after macro substitution is done, each preprocessing token - and here there are two of them (the two minus signs) - are converted into actual tokens, and then they’re syntactically and semantically analyzed. That means that there’s no opportunity for the compiler to rescan those tokens to reinterpret them as a single token. So this is a weird case where the resulting token stream can’t actually be typed into the source code without changing the meaning.

  • So the compiler will see --5 and will complain because it can only apply the decerment operator to a variable. Correct? – Paul Ogilvie Oct 14 '17 at 15:30
  • Except that that doesn’t seem to happen. I don’t believe the compiler will do that. But perhaps I’m mistaken? – templatetypedef Oct 14 '17 at 15:33
  • Would the preprocessor replace --5 with the value 5? i.e., it evaluates constant expressions? – Paul Ogilvie Oct 14 '17 at 15:36
  • The preprocessor won’t do this, but once the rest of compilation proceeds the later compiler stages will probably do this. – templatetypedef Oct 14 '17 at 15:45
  • I think above explanation is trying to say that two minuses are not interpreted as singe decrement operator rather two unary minuses. as rescanning does not take place after pre-processing. Following program justifies above explanation as following program would give compile error as after scanning stage itself, pre-processor gets to know that -- is a decrement operator rather two unary minuses. #include<stdio.h> #define C 5 int main() { printf("The value of C is %d\n", --C); return 0; } – Rishab Shinghal Oct 14 '17 at 15:46

Think of the resultant expression as this instead:

-(-(5))
  • But the preprocessing rules say that brackets are not substituted by the preprocessor when replacing the macros. – Rishab Shinghal Oct 14 '17 at 15:28
  • 1
    Actually, come to think of it, the compiler is not doing this. What’s going on is more complicated and has to do with how the compilation process works. If this explanation were correct, it would need to account for why the compiler doesn’t put parentheses around other macro expanded expressions. – templatetypedef Oct 14 '17 at 15:48
  • I only said "think of it as". Not "the compiler is actually doing this". I think it's a simple way to understand what it's doing in this case. Perhaps it would be clearer to say it is as though it's adding a space betwen them? – noelicus Oct 14 '17 at 16:07
  • Fair enough. I don't. I think it's more accurate, not more clear. So this info is all useful. – noelicus Oct 14 '17 at 16:25

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