6

I want to check whether a string starts with any character in a list. My current implementation in C# is as follows:

char[] columnChars = new char[] { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E' };
private bool startWithColumn(string toCheck)
{
   for(int i=0; i<columnChars.Length; i++)   
     if (toCheck.StartsWith(columnChars[i]+""))
     {
       return true;
     }

   return false;
}

I would like to know if any solution is better?

  • The numerous answers go to show that there's definitely lots of ways to do the same thing in C#. – JYelton Jan 12 '11 at 22:50

13 Answers 13

9

Turn the check around and see if the first character is in the allowable set.

 char[] columnChars = new char[] { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E' };
 private bool startWithColumn(string toCheck)
 {
     return toCheck != null
                && toCheck.Length > 0
                && columnChars.Any( c => c == toCheck[0] );
 }
6

You can get the first character out of a string easily enough:

char c = toCheck[0];

And then check whether it's in the array:

return columnChars.Contains(c);
5

I needed something similar, but for strings:

I wanted to know if my string subject started with any of these strings:

var qualent3s = new string[] { "D", "M", "H", "JUK"};

The LINQ to do so is simple:

qualent3s.Any(x => subject.StartsWith(x))
  • You can simplify the query: qualent3s.Any(subject.StartsWith) – Daniel Miller Jan 4 '18 at 23:06
3

If your character "list" is definitely going to be a char[], I would assume you're best off with:

return toCheck.IndexOfAny(columnChars) == 0;

Disclaimer: I haven't benchmarked this. But that method's just sitting there.

3
return columnChars.Any(x => x == toCheck[0]);
1
return Regex.IsMatch(toCheck, "^[A-E]");

Alternatively:

return toCheck.Length > 0 && columnChars.Contains(toCheck[0]);
  • 1
    Poor regex. Often overkill, often not powerful enough :( – user395760 Jan 12 '11 at 22:47
0

I believe this one would be faster:

char[] columnChars = new char[] { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E' };
private bool startWithColumn(string toCheck)
{
   for(int i=0; i<columnChars.Length; i++)   
     if (toCheck.Length > 0 && toCheck[0] == columnChars[i]))
     {
       return true;
     }

   return false;
}
0
private bool startWithColumn(string toCheck)
{
  return (columnChars.IndexOf(toCheck[0]) >=0);
}
0

The obvious way would be to linear-search the array for the first character of the string:

private bool startWithColumn(string toCheck)
{
     return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(toCheck) 
           && Array.IndexOf(columnChars, toCheck[0]) != -1; 
}

If you're looking for performance, consider using a HashSet<char> or similar instead of an array, which should give you a constant-time lookup. This is probably only worth it if the array were much larger; you'll have to measure one way or another.

0

Here is what I came up with:

    readonly char[] columnChars = new char[] { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E' };
    private bool startWithColumn(string toCheck)
    {
        return columnChars.Contains(toCheck.Substring(0, 1).ToCharArray()[0]);
    }

Edit

Didn't see a possibility for making fewer conversions:

    readonly char[] columnChars = new char[] { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E' };
    private bool startWithColumn(string toCheck)
    {
        return columnChars.Contains(toCheck[0]);
    }
0

You can do it using Contains and ElementAt:

char[] columnChars = new char[] { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E' }; 
String testString = "This is test String";
var exists = columnChars.Contains(testString.ElementAt(0));
0

I love my linq so here:

        string str = "A quick brown fox";
        char[] chars = { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F' };

        var query = from c in str.Substring(0, 1)
                    join c1 in chars on c equals c1
                    select c;

That will give you all the characters, in the list, that match the first character of the string. A little modification and you could even get the index of the character in the list of characters you are searching, in this case index 0.

here is that code:

        string str = "A quick brown fox";
        char[] chars = { 'Z', 'X', 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F' };

        var query = from c in str.Substring(0, 1)
                    join c1 in chars on c equals c1
                    select new { Character = c, Index = chars.ToList().IndexOf(c) };

        var found = query.ToArray();
  • So, you need a little (how little?) modification to get this to solve the OP's problem, and in the end you get a horrid solution with joins? Sorry, but LINQ is not a golden hammer. Regexes are :P – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 12 '11 at 23:04
  • @Martinho ah, another linq hater. Regex, seriously? That's easier to maintain and is more readable? I guess you code for a one man team. – SRM Jan 12 '11 at 23:06
  • @Martinho This is object linq, not linq to sql so joins are not that expensive. Also, since 2005 SQL server has optimized ALL execution paths so ad hoc sql, such as linq generates, runs just as fast as a stored proc so that argument is out the window. Linq is used in a lot of enterprise apps for a reason. Although I will admit that the chars.ToList I used in the linq query could be optimized. I'm not sure if the linq compiler will optimize it and cache that value or if it get's called each pass. It would be better to create a local variable and use that instead. – SRM Jan 12 '11 at 23:08
  • 1
    @SRM: I like LINQ and I was joking about the regexes. I prefer readable code, though. And besides, chars.Any(x => x == str[0]) is a much more readable use of LINQ to solve this problem. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 12 '11 at 23:10
  • @Martinho Lol - honestly thought you were serious about regexes. Your example is definitely more terse, and it uses lambdas which deserves a nod just for that. Although it won't give you the index ;). You could probably move the anonymous type into there though, and call IndexOf and get the same functionality. I can't +1 your comment but I did flag it. Well done. – SRM Jan 12 '11 at 23:14
0

In such cases I use an extension method like this:

public static bool StartsWithAny(this string Text, IEnumerable<string> Needles) {
            return Needles.Any(x => Text.StartsWith(x));
        }

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