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I am studying object oriented programming with Lua. I am having trouble understanding the functional differences between assigning a table in the __index field of an instance and setting a metatable for the instance. I reviewed the official Lua's reference manual, but I dont fully grasp the difference. For example, to create an instance of the Account class, it sets the __index field of the Account class (self) to itself, then sets the instance's metatable to the Account class.

function Account:new (o)
  o = o or {}
  self.__index = self
  setmetatable(o, self)
  return o
end

What is going on here? In this case, why is Account setting it's own index to itself? What's the use of true metatables in this case if the instance 'o' is just using the Account class as its metatable? Why does Lua allow classes be metatables for its instances?

From my understanding, metatables are supposed to be tables comprised only of metamethods (__newindex, __index, __add, etc.). But the example has __index as a field of the Account class, which by this point, is not a metatable and doesn't have a metatable assigned to it such that the assignment looks up another metatable, if that makes sense.

Thanks in advance.

1 Answer 1

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In the example, Account is the metatable, and o is the instance. Since Account is being used as a class, it needs an __index field to define regular methods. The __index field is defined in the constructor because the act of calling the constructor implies that Account is being used as a class.

Since it is somewhat redundant to define __index in the constructor, you will often see examples like this:

Account = {}
Account.__index = Account

function Account:new (o)
  o = o or {}
  setmetatable(o, self)
  return o
end

I am having trouble understanding the functional differences between assigning a table in the __index field of an instance and setting a metatable for the instance.

You generally don't put __index in an instance. (Although in the PiL example, any object could potentially be used as another class. Use with caution.) Setting the metatable for the instance is what applies the metamethods to that instance.

From my understanding, metatables are supposed to be tables comprised only of metamethods (__newindex, __index, __add, etc.).

There are no restrictions on what a metatable can contain, however a table needs to define at least one metamethod to have any effect when used as a metatable.

Metamethods essentially provide operator overloading. This means metatables can define behavior for other tables. __index is the really important metamethod for OOP, because that's how we can use an instance to access methods and variables defined in the class.

Why does a metatable's __index usually point to itself? Because otherwise, we would need another table to hold the regular methods. For simple OOP frameworks, it's easier to have one table do both jobs.

Short answer: A metatable defines metamethods for the instance. __index is the metamethod that routes field access to another table (if __index is a table. It could also be a function).

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  • Thank you for your speedy answer. Regarding assigning "Account.__index = Account", would I be correct in saying this is only required when I expect the user to create Account instances, otherwise, the assignment is not needed? Oct 15, 2017 at 5:40
  • Yes. I don't know of any other reason to do that.
    – luther
    Oct 15, 2017 at 22:45
  • 1
    Okay, thank you! This helps out a lot. I finally get it now. I come from a C++/Java/C# background, so Lua's version of an Object Oriented design requires some adjustment to my way of thinking. Oct 16, 2017 at 14:31
  • Happy to help. Don't forget to mark the answer as accepted. (See the checkmark below the up/down vote arrows.)
    – luther
    Oct 16, 2017 at 21:08

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