0

From Programming Language Pragmatics, by Scott

To resume a thread that is suspended on a given object, some other thread must execute the predefined method notify from within a synchronized statement or method that refers to the same object. Like wait, notify has no arguments. In response to a notify call, the language run-time system picks an arbitrary thread suspended on the object and makes it runnable. If there are no such threads, then the notify is a no-op. As in Mesa, it may sometimes be appropriate to awaken all threads waiting in a given object; Java provides a built-in notifyAll method for this purpose.

If threads are waiting for more than one condition (i.e., if their waits are embedded in dissimilar loops), there is no guarantee that the “right” thread will awaken. To ensure that an appropriate thread does wake up, the programmer may choose to use notifyAll instead of notify. To ensure that only one thread continues after wakeup, the first thread to discover that its condition has been satisfied must modify the state of the object in such a way that other awakened threads, when they get to run, will simply go back to sleep. Unfortunately, since all waiting threads will end up reevaluating their conditions every time one of them can run, this “solution” to the multiple-condition problem can be quite expensive.

  • When using notifyAll, all the awaken threads will contend to reacquire the lock, but only one can reacquire the lock, then return from wait() and then reevaluate the condition. So why does it say that "all waiting threads will end up reevaluating their conditions every time one of them can run"?

  • How does the thread, which reacquires the lock and rechecks that the condition become true, "modify the state of the object in such a way that other awakened threads, when they get to run, will simply go back to sleep"?

Thanks.

  • Object.notify() only wakes up a single thread – codeflush.dev Oct 15 '17 at 1:53
  • @rollback The book says notifyAll not notify. – user3284469 Oct 15 '17 at 1:56
0

So why does it say that "all waiting threads will end up reevaluating their conditions every time one of them can run"?

After it will reacquire and release the lock a different thread will aquire it and run. This will continue until they all do that.

How does the thread, which reacquires the lock and rechecks that the condition become true, "modify the state of the object in such a way that other awakened threads, when they get to run, will simply go back to sleep"?

All the threads will have something like:

while (condition) {
    wait();
}

The notifyAll() caller will set condition to false before calling it and then the awakened thread will exit the while loop and before it returns and releases it will do:

condition = true;

All the other threads will awaken, check the condition, stay in the while loop and call wait() (go back to sleep).

  • Thanks. In your last two sentences, how does an awaken thread set up condition = true so that it can make other awaken thread back to wait? I wonder if any other awaken thread may jump out of the while(condition) loop before the awaken thread can set up condition = true, so the two awaken threads can continue, which is incorrect. – user3284469 Oct 25 '17 at 2:55
  • @Ben They can't because the awakened thread holds the lock, others threads will awake one at a time only after it will release it. – Oleg Oct 25 '17 at 3:02
  • Here is my understanding. All awaken threads will resume from the call to wait(). Because the call to wait() is inside a synchronized method, all awaken threads implicitly i.e. automatically reacquired the implicit lock of the synchronized method when they wake up, which makes the implicit lock not working. So one of the awaken thread must prevent the other awaken threads from continuing by setting condition=true in time to prevent other awaken threads from continuing. How does it set condition=true to achieve that? – user3284469 Oct 25 '17 at 3:19
  • Yes, exactly. condition = true; should be called before exiting the synchronized method. – Oleg Oct 25 '17 at 3:22
  • "They can't because the awakened thread holds the lock, others threads will awake one at a time only after it will release it. " Do you mean only one of the threads waken by notifyAll() reacquires the implicit lock of synchronized, and the other threads waken by notifyAll() do not? – user3284469 Oct 25 '17 at 3:29
0

Additionally, you should use explicit locking mechanism because it allows you to have multiple conditions and condition queues for a single lock, which will enable you to use signal() instead of signalAll(). And that has better performance and less contention.

Condition API

  • Thanks. Each Condition variable has its own condition queue, then do we always use signal() and never use signalAll()? Does signalAll() notify all the threads waiting on the Condition variable? When do we use signalAll()? – user3284469 Oct 25 '17 at 1:45
  • It just depends if multiple threads are waiting on the condition and you don't want the case of skipped notification to occur (which can happen though rarely that if the thread can still not proceed because let's say it is waiting on another lock), you would wake all threads using signalAll. the point here is that there are multiple condition queues so there can be multiple wait sets per lock. – Ramandeep Nanda Oct 25 '17 at 2:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy