Is there a way to interpolate a string variable into code? This is what I'm trying to do, and of course it wouldn't even compile.

my $cmd = " + 5 ";
my $a = 3;

$a = $a { $cmd };
say $a;
  • Why is $cmd a string in the first place? Shouldn't it be a function? – melpomene Oct 16 '17 at 12:10
  • Of course, I understand how to do it with a sub. The question (probably a silly one) is whether it is possible to do it with a string. – Eugene Barsky Oct 16 '17 at 12:18
  • 3
    my $cmd = * + 5; is better. Then you can do $a .= $cmd; – Brad Gilbert Oct 16 '17 at 14:00
  • @BradGilbert, So * is a placeholder? – Eugene Barsky Oct 16 '17 at 14:29
  • 2
    You can think of * as a placeholder. Here, * + 5 effectively becomes the code block { $_ + 5 }. Then $a .= $cmd runs that code, using the value of $a for $_ and then replacing the original value of $a with the result. – Christopher Bottoms Oct 16 '17 at 15:28
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could try use EVAL, but note that using EVAL is dangerous if you do not have complete control over the string that is going to be evaluated (e.g. consider stuff like EVAL 'shell "rm -rf *"'):

use MONKEY-SEE-NO-EVAL;
my $cmd = " + 5 ";
my $a = 3;
$a = EVAL( EVAL '$a ~ $cmd' ); 
say $a;

Output:

8

Note:

The line $a = EVAL( EVAL '$a ~ $cmd' ) incorporates the concatenation operator into the string to be evaluated. If this is not necessary, you could simplify this to $a = EVAL( $a ~ $cmd ) (as suggested by @W4anD0eR96)

  • Thanks! Yes, I see, it's really dangerous... – Eugene Barsky Oct 16 '17 at 12:39

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