17

I want to use an entire div as a link.. without the use of "onclick"

Is this possible with a simple href?

Thanks

8 Answers 8

19

No, div elements cannot have the href attribute, nor will they act like links. You can use the following in HTML5:

<a href="#"><div></div></a>

However, not all current generation browsers (notably Firefox 3.6) supports this. The other alternative is to add a absolutely positioned a element that has 100% width and height to the div:

div a {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
}

This is valid HTML4, but it won't work on older versions of IE, of course. Otherwise should accomplish what you want. See: http://www.jsfiddle.net/uRh7j/

19

you can't. but you could use an <a> with style="display:block", wich should behave exactly like a <div>, to replace your <div>

1
  • Thanks, this was better than the top answer :)
    – munich
    Commented Nov 29, 2016 at 23:29
5

simple answer is no, you can use onclick with css cursor:pointer to get the same functionality, though.

1

Per the HTML spec (HTML 4.01, Draft 5 and XHTML 1,1.1) an anchor tag <a> cannot enclose a <div> tag.

1
  • 2
    Since this answer was posted, HTML5 has come out. <a>s around <div>s are now legal as of HTML5. Commented Nov 9, 2014 at 22:22
1

Wrap an anchor around it.

<a href="#"><div></div></a>
7
  • 2
    Per my comment a moment ago, that's illegal HTML and it's not guaranteed to work in browsers (and in fact, it does not work in at least webkit-based browsers and gecko-browsers.) Commented Jan 13, 2011 at 7:14
  • @Daniel: The word "solution" connotes that "it works". This doesn't. Commented Jan 13, 2011 at 7:17
  • 2
    @OmnipotentEntity That's odd, because I just tried that markup in both Firefox 4 and Chrome 9 and it worked just fine.
    – daniel
    Commented Jan 13, 2011 at 7:18
  • 1
    @Kyle That was a response to Omni's claim that it didn't work in Gecko and Webkit browsers. Regardless, I tried this markup in Firefox 4, Chrome 9, IE 8, Opera 11, and Safari 5, and it rendered as expected in all of them. Any bugs that arise from this could probably be solved with some CSS/Javascript anyway. For clarification on my initial comment, I realise that it's not valid, but my rationale is "if it works for you and your audience, then who cares?". There are plenty of sites on the web that don't validate properly, yet function perfectly well.
    – daniel
    Commented Jan 20, 2011 at 3:59
  • 1
    The above comments about this being illegal are outdated; wrapping an <a> tag around <div>s or other block-level elements is now supported and legal in HTML5. Commented Nov 9, 2014 at 22:22
0

I do not think this is possible without the use of onclick event.You can use display:block; for displaying the link as a div but nothing else.

0

why not you use javascript framework such as jquery, let the div has no onclick event but declare an event in jquery, such this:

   <script>
         $(function(){ 
           $(".click").click(function{ alert('clicked!'); });
        });        
   </script>

   <div class="click"></div>

just my 2 cents. thanks.

0

You can accomplish this by creating a small transparent PNG (say, 10px * 10px) and using CSS to set the width and height of the PNG to 100%. Then you can wrap the img tag with your a href tag.

Here's the HTML:

<div id="YourHeader">
    <a href="http://example.com"><img src="/path/to/header10x10.png" /></a>
</div>

Here's the CSS:

#YourHeader img {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%; 
}

This is especially handy if #YourHeader is an empty div whose only purpose is to display a header image via its background-image attribute.

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