11

I am trying to create a shape similar to this, hexagons with 12 pentagons, at an arbitrary size.

https://i.stack.imgur.com/F35J0.png

(Image Source)

The only thing is, I have absolutely no idea what kind of code would be needed to generate it!

The goal is to be able to take a point in 3D space and convert it to a position coordinate on the grid, or vice versa and take a grid position and get the relevant vertices for drawing the mesh.

I don't even know how one would store the grid positions for this. Does each "triagle section" between 3 pentagons get their own set of 2D coordinates?

I will most likely be using C# for this, but I am more interested in which algorithms to use for this and an explanation of how they would work, rather than someone just giving me a piece of code.

  • 1
    I would start with calculating positions of the 12 pentagons - this souldn't be that difficult. The, using slerp (spherical linear interpolation), I would try to calculate positions of hexagons in each trinagle section. That's just a thought that came to my mind. – navyblue Oct 17 '17 at 6:25
  • there are 2 approaches I know of: 1. Hexagonal tilling of hemi-sphere but that can not be used on whole sphere but can be faked by remapping while rotation. 2. sphere triangulation if you start from 2 hexagons and subdivide you got map of triangles. Now you just need to find a way how to map them into your hexagons and pentagons. If you want nicer sphere instead use icosahedron as start point. – Spektre Oct 17 '17 at 7:50
  • Not sure how you intend to map the grid? I.e. how do you intend to assign a coordinate label to each grid cell – meowgoesthedog Oct 17 '17 at 10:51
  • @meowgoesthedog complete reedit with new code and images – Spektre Oct 18 '17 at 14:25
  • @meowgoesthedog I am not sure either. I would appreciate any ideas. – Aaron Franke Oct 23 '17 at 1:17
12

First some analysis of the image in the question: the spherical triangle spanned by neighbouring pentagon centers seems to be equilateral. When five equilateral triangles meet in one corner and cover the whole sphere, this can only be the configuration induced by a icosahedron. So there are 12 pentagons and 20 patches of a triangular cutout of a hexongal mesh mapped to the sphere.

So this is a way to construct such a hexagonal grid on the sphere:

  1. Create triangular cutout of hexagonal grid: a fixed triangle (I chose (-0.5,0),(0.5,0),(0,sqrt(3)/2) ) gets superimposed a hexagonal grid with desired resolution n s.t. the triangle corners coincide with hexagon centers, see the examples for n = 0,1,2,20: enter image description here

  2. Compute corners of icosahedron and define the 20 triangular faces of it (see code below). The corners of the icosahedron define the centers of the pentagons, the faces of the icosahedron define the patches of the mapped hexagonal grids. (The icosahedron gives the finest regular division of the sphere surface into triangles, i.e. a division into congruent equilateral triangles. Other such divisions can be derived from a tetrahedron or an octahedron; then at the corners of the triangles one will have triangles or squares, resp. Furthermore the fewer and bigger triangles would make the inevitable distortion in any mapping of a planar mesh onto a curved surface more visible. So choosing the icosahedron as a basis for the triangular patches helps minimizing the distortion of the hexagons.)

  3. Map triangular cutout of hexagonal grid to spherical triangles corresponding to icosaeder faces: a double-slerp based on barycentric coordinates does the trick. Below is an illustration of the mapping of a triangular cutout of a hexagonal grid with resolution n = 10 onto one spherical triangle (defined by one face of an icosaeder), and an illustration of mapping the grid onto all these spherical triangles covering the whole sphere (different colors for different mappings):

enter image description here enter image description here

Here is Python code to generate the corners (coordinates) and triangles (point indices) of an icosahedron:

from math import sin,cos,acos,sqrt,pi
s,c = 2/sqrt(5),1/sqrt(5)
topPoints = [(0,0,1)] + [(s*cos(i*2*pi/5.), s*sin(i*2*pi/5.), c) for i in range(5)]
bottomPoints = [(-x,y,-z) for (x,y,z) in topPoints]
icoPoints = topPoints + bottomPoints
icoTriangs = [(0,i+1,(i+1)%5+1) for i in range(5)] +\
             [(6,i+7,(i+1)%5+7) for i in range(5)] +\
             [(i+1,(i+1)%5+1,(7-i)%5+7) for i in range(5)] +\
             [(i+1,(7-i)%5+7,(8-i)%5+7) for i in range(5)]

And here is the Python code to map (points of) the fixed triangle to a spherical triangle using a double slerp:

# barycentric coords for triangle (-0.5,0),(0.5,0),(0,sqrt(3)/2)
def barycentricCoords(p):
  x,y = p
  # l3*sqrt(3)/2 = y
  l3 = y*2./sqrt(3.)
  # l1 + l2 + l3 = 1
  # 0.5*(l2 - l1) = x
  l2 = x + 0.5*(1 - l3)
  l1 = 1 - l2 - l3
  return l1,l2,l3

from math import atan2
def scalProd(p1,p2):
  return sum([p1[i]*p2[i] for i in range(len(p1))])
# uniform interpolation of arc defined by p0, p1 (around origin)
# t=0 -> p0, t=1 -> p1
def slerp(p0,p1,t):
  assert abs(scalProd(p0,p0) - scalProd(p1,p1)) < 1e-7
  ang0Cos = scalProd(p0,p1)/scalProd(p0,p0)
  ang0Sin = sqrt(1 - ang0Cos*ang0Cos)
  ang0 = atan2(ang0Sin,ang0Cos)
  l0 = sin((1-t)*ang0)
  l1 = sin(t    *ang0)
  return tuple([(l0*p0[i] + l1*p1[i])/ang0Sin for i in range(len(p0))])

# map 2D point p to spherical triangle s1,s2,s3 (3D vectors of equal length)
def mapGridpoint2Sphere(p,s1,s2,s3):
  l1,l2,l3 = barycentricCoords(p)
  if abs(l3-1) < 1e-10: return s3
  l2s = l2/(l1+l2)
  p12 = slerp(s1,s2,l2s)
  return slerp(p12,s3,l3)
  • Does this method allow me to arbitrarily draw a subsection of the sphere? – Aaron Franke Nov 23 '17 at 20:04
  • @AaronFranke sure: the grid is constructed from lines connecting points. Points and lines can be filtered as needed. – coproc Nov 24 '17 at 17:40
10

The shape you have is one of so called "Goldberg polyhedra", is also a geodesic polyhedra.

The (rather elegant) algorithm to generate this (and many many more) can be succinctly encoded in something called a Conway Polyhedron Notation.

The construction is easy to follow step by step, you can click the images below to get a live preview.

  1. The polyhedron you are looking for can be generated from an isosahedron -- Initialise a mesh with an isosahedron. isosahedron

  2. We apply a "Truncate" operation (Conway notation t) to the mesh (the sperical mapping of this one is a football). enter image description here

  3. We apply the "Dual" operator (Conway notation d). enter image description here

  4. We apply a "Truncate" operation again. At this point the recipe is tdtI (read from right!). You can already see where this is going. enter image description here

  5. Apply steps 3 & 4 repeatedly until you are satisfied.

For example below is the mesh for dtdtdtdtI. enter image description here

This is quite easy to implement. I would suggest using a datastructure that makes it easy to traverse the neighbourhood give a vertex, edge etc. such as winged-edge or half-edge datastructures for your mesh. You only need to implement truncate and dual operators for the shape you are looking for.

  • Does this method allow me to arbitrarily draw a subsection of the sphere? – Aaron Franke Nov 23 '17 at 20:04
  • You can always generate the whole thing and then delete the parts of the mesh you don't need. You can even try removing parts of the sphere after one of the dual operations —the whole mesh will be triangles at that point, and then refine the rest further. – hkrish Nov 24 '17 at 7:07
  • That's not ideal. The goal is with this is to take a list of hexagonal positions on the sphere, get vertices, and draw them. I have to start small because I was thinking about using these as planets, for which I would need many levels of recursion, and which you can only ever see a part of. I can't afford to calculate dtdtdtdtdtdtdtdtdtdtdtdtdtdtdtdtI – Aaron Franke Dec 6 '17 at 20:02
6

[Complete re-edit 18.10.2017]

the geometry storage is on you. Either you store it in some kind of Mesh or you generate it on the fly. I prefer to store it. In form of 2 tables. One holding all the vertexes (no duplicates) and the other holding 6 indexes of used points per each hex you got and some aditional info like spherical position to ease up the post processing.

Now how to generate this:

  1. create hex triangle

    the size should be radius of your sphere. do not include the corner hexess and also skip last line of the triangle (on both radial and axial so there is 1 hex gap between neighbor triangles on sphere) as that would overlap when joining out triangle segments.

  2. convert 60deg hexagon triangle to 72deg pie

    so simply convert to polar coordiantes (radius,angle), center triangle around 0 deg. Then multiply radius by cos(angle)/cos(30); which will convert triangle into Pie. And then rescale angle with ratio 72/60. That will make our triangle joinable...

  3. copy&rotate triangle to fill 5 segments of pentagon

    easy just rotate the points of first triangle and store as new one.

  4. compute z

    based on this Hexagonal tilling of hemi-sphere you can convert distance in 2D map into arc-length to limit the distortions as much a s possible.

    However when I tried it (example below) the hexagons are a bit distorted so the depth and scaling needs some tweaking. Or post processing latter.

  5. copy the half sphere to form a sphere

    simply copy the points/hexes and negate z axis (or rotate by 180 deg if you want to preserve winding).

  6. add equator and all of the missing pentagons and hexes

    You should use the coordinates of the neighboring hexes so no more distortion and overlaps are added to the grid. Here preview:

    img

    Blue is starting triangle. Darker blue are its copies. Red are pole pentagons. Dark green is the equator, Lighter green are the join lines between triangles. In Yellowish are the missing equator hexagons near Dark Orange pentagons.

Here simple C++ OpenGL example (made from the linked answer in #4):

//$$---- Form CPP ----
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
#include <vcl.h>
#include <math.h>
#pragma hdrstop
#include "win_main.h"
#include "gl/OpenGL3D_double.cpp"
#include "PolyLine.h"
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
#pragma package(smart_init)
#pragma resource "*.dfm"
TMain *Main;
OpenGLscreen scr;
bool _redraw=true;
double animx=  0.0,danimx=0.0;
double animy=  0.0,danimy=0.0;
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
PointTab     pnt;   // (x,y,z)

struct _hexagon
    {
    int ix[6];      // index of 6 points, last point duplicate for pentagon
    int a,b;        // spherical coordinate
    DWORD col;      // color

    // inline
    _hexagon()      {}
    _hexagon(_hexagon& a)   { *this=a; }
    ~_hexagon() {}
    _hexagon* operator = (const _hexagon *a) { *this=*a; return this; }
    //_hexagon* operator = (const _hexagon &a) { ...copy... return this; }
    };
List<_hexagon> hex;
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
// https://stackoverflow.com/a/46787885/2521214
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void hex_sphere(int N,double R)
    {
    const double c=cos(60.0*deg);
    const double s=sin(60.0*deg);
    const double sy=       R/(N+N-2);
    const double sz=sy/s;
    const double sx=sz*c;
    const double sz2=0.5*sz;

    const int na=5*(N-2);
    const int nb=  N;
    const int b0=  N;
    double *q,p[3],ang,len,l,l0,ll;
    int i,j,n,a,b,ix;
    _hexagon h,*ph;

    hex.allocate(na*nb);
    hex.num=0;
    pnt.reset3D(N*N);
    b=0; a=0; ix=0;

    // generate triangle hex grid
    h.col=0x00804000;
    for (b=1;b<N-1;b++)                             // skip first line b=0
     for (a=1;a<b;a++)                              // skip first and last line
        {
        p[0]=double(a       )*(sx+sz);
        p[1]=double(b-(a>>1))*(sy*2.0);
        p[2]=0.0;
        if (int(a&1)!=0) p[1]-=sy;
        ix=pnt.add(p[0]+sz2+sx,p[1]   ,p[2]); h.ix[0]=ix; //  2 1
        ix=pnt.add(p[0]+sz2   ,p[1]+sy,p[2]); h.ix[1]=ix; // 3   0
        ix=pnt.add(p[0]-sz2   ,p[1]+sy,p[2]); h.ix[2]=ix; //  4 5
        ix=pnt.add(p[0]-sz2-sx,p[1]   ,p[2]); h.ix[3]=ix;
        ix=pnt.add(p[0]-sz2   ,p[1]-sy,p[2]); h.ix[4]=ix;
        ix=pnt.add(p[0]+sz2   ,p[1]-sy,p[2]); h.ix[5]=ix;
        h.a=a;
        h.b=N-1-b;
        hex.add(h);
        } n=hex.num; // remember number of hexs for the first triangle

    // distort points to match area
    for (ix=0;ix<pnt.nn;ix+=3)
        {
        // point pointer
        q=pnt.pnt.dat+ix;
        // convert to polar coordinates
        ang=atan2(q[1],q[0]);
        len=vector_len(q);
        // match area of pentagon (72deg) triangle as we got hexagon (60deg) triangle
        ang-=60.0*deg;  // rotate so center of generated triangle is angle 0deg
        while (ang>+60.0*deg) ang-=pi2;
        while (ang<-60.0*deg) ang+=pi2;
        len*=cos(ang)/cos(30.0*deg);        // scale radius so triangle converts to pie
        ang*=72.0/60.0;                     // scale up angle so rotated triangles merge
        // convert back to cartesian
        q[0]=len*cos(ang);
        q[1]=len*sin(ang);
        }

    // copy and rotate the triangle to cover pentagon
    h.col=0x00404000;
    for (ang=72.0*deg,a=1;a<5;a++,ang+=72.0*deg)
     for (ph=hex.dat,i=0;i<n;i++,ph++)
        {
        for (j=0;j<6;j++)
            {
            vector_copy(p,pnt.pnt.dat+ph->ix[j]);
            rotate2d(-ang,p[0],p[1]);
            h.ix[j]=pnt.add(p[0],p[1],p[2]);
            }
        h.a=ph->a+(a*(N-2));
        h.b=ph->b;
        hex.add(h);
        }

    // compute z
    for (q=pnt.pnt.dat,ix=0;ix<pnt.nn;ix+=pnt.dn,q+=pnt.dn)
        {
        q[2]=0.0;
        ang=vector_len(q)*0.5*pi/R;
        q[2]=R*cos(ang);
        ll=fabs(R*sin(ang)/sqrt((q[0]*q[0])+(q[1]*q[1])));
        q[0]*=ll;
        q[1]*=ll;
        }

    // copy and mirror the other half-sphere
    n=hex.num;
    for (ph=hex.dat,i=0;i<n;i++,ph++)
        {
        for (j=0;j<6;j++)
            {
            vector_copy(p,pnt.pnt.dat+ph->ix[j]);
            p[2]=-p[2];
            h.ix[j]=pnt.add(p[0],p[1],p[2]);
            }
        h.a= ph->a;
        h.b=-ph->b;
        hex.add(h);
        }

    // create index search table
    int i0,i1,j0,j1,a0,a1,ii[5];
    int **ab=new int*[na];
    for (a=0;a<na;a++)
        {
        ab[a]=new int[nb+nb+1];
        for (b=-nb;b<=nb;b++) ab[a][b0+b]=-1;
        }
    n=hex.num;
    for (ph=hex.dat,i=0;i<n;i++,ph++) ab[ph->a][b0+ph->b]=i;

    // add join ring
    h.col=0x00408000;
    for (a=0;a<na;a++)
        {
        h.a=a;
        h.b=0;
        a0=a;
        a1=a+1; if (a1>=na) a1-=na;
        i0=ab[a0][b0+1];
        i1=ab[a1][b0+1];
        j0=ab[a0][b0-1];
        j1=ab[a1][b0-1];
        if ((i0>=0)&&(i1>=0))
         if ((j0>=0)&&(j1>=0))
            {
            h.ix[0]=hex[i1].ix[1];
            h.ix[1]=hex[i0].ix[0];
            h.ix[2]=hex[i0].ix[1];
            h.ix[3]=hex[j0].ix[1];
            h.ix[4]=hex[j0].ix[0];
            h.ix[5]=hex[j1].ix[1];
            hex.add(h);
            ab[h.a][b0+h.b]=hex.num-1;
            }
        }

    // add 2x5 join lines
    h.col=0x00008040;
    for (a=0;a<na;a+=N-2)
     for (b=1;b<N-3;b++)
        {
        // +b hemisphere
        h.a= a;
        h.b=+b;
        a0=a-b; if (a0<  0) a0+=na; i0=ab[a0][b0+b+0];
        a0--;   if (a0<  0) a0+=na; i1=ab[a0][b0+b+1];
        a1=a+1; if (a1>=na) a1-=na; j0=ab[a1][b0+b+0];
                                    j1=ab[a1][b0+b+1];
        if ((i0>=0)&&(i1>=0))
         if ((j0>=0)&&(j1>=0))
            {
            h.ix[0]=hex[i0].ix[5];
            h.ix[1]=hex[i0].ix[4];
            h.ix[2]=hex[i1].ix[5];
            h.ix[3]=hex[j1].ix[3];
            h.ix[4]=hex[j0].ix[4];
            h.ix[5]=hex[j0].ix[3];
            hex.add(h);
            }
        // -b hemisphere
        h.a= a;
        h.b=-b;
        a0=a-b; if (a0<  0) a0+=na; i0=ab[a0][b0-b+0];
        a0--;   if (a0<  0) a0+=na; i1=ab[a0][b0-b-1];
        a1=a+1; if (a1>=na) a1-=na; j0=ab[a1][b0-b+0];
                                    j1=ab[a1][b0-b-1];
        if ((i0>=0)&&(i1>=0))
         if ((j0>=0)&&(j1>=0))
            {
            h.ix[0]=hex[i0].ix[5];
            h.ix[1]=hex[i0].ix[4];
            h.ix[2]=hex[i1].ix[5];
            h.ix[3]=hex[j1].ix[3];
            h.ix[4]=hex[j0].ix[4];
            h.ix[5]=hex[j0].ix[3];
            hex.add(h);
            }
        }

    // add pentagons at poles
    _hexagon h0,h1;
    h0.col=0x00000080;
    h0.a=0; h0.b=N-1; h1=h0; h1.b=-h1.b;
    p[2]=sqrt((R*R)-(sz*sz));
    for (ang=0.0,a=0;a<5;a++,ang+=72.0*deg)
        {
        p[0]=2.0*sz*cos(ang);
        p[1]=2.0*sz*sin(ang);
        h0.ix[a]=pnt.add(p[0],p[1],+p[2]);
        h1.ix[a]=pnt.add(p[0],p[1],-p[2]);
        }
    h0.ix[5]=h0.ix[4]; hex.add(h0);
    h1.ix[5]=h1.ix[4]; hex.add(h1);

    // add 5 missing hexagons at poles
    h.col=0x00600060;
    for (ph=&h0,b=N-3,h.b=N-2,i=0;i<2;i++,b=-b,ph=&h1,h.b=-h.b)
        {
        a =  1; if (a>=na) a-=na; ii[0]=ab[a][b0+b];
        a+=N-2; if (a>=na) a-=na; ii[1]=ab[a][b0+b];
        a+=N-2; if (a>=na) a-=na; ii[2]=ab[a][b0+b];
        a+=N-2; if (a>=na) a-=na; ii[3]=ab[a][b0+b];
        a+=N-2; if (a>=na) a-=na; ii[4]=ab[a][b0+b];
        for (j=0;j<5;j++)
            {
            h.a=((4+j)%5)*(N-2)+1;
            h.ix[0]=ph->ix[ (5-j)%5 ];
            h.ix[1]=ph->ix[ (6-j)%5 ];
            h.ix[2]=hex[ii[(j+4)%5]].ix[4];
            h.ix[3]=hex[ii[(j+4)%5]].ix[5];
            h.ix[4]=hex[ii[ j     ]].ix[3];
            h.ix[5]=hex[ii[ j     ]].ix[4];
            hex.add(h);
            }
        }

    // add 2*5 pentagons and 2*5 missing hexagons at equator
    h0.a=0; h0.b=N-1; h1=h0; h1.b=-h1.b;
    for (ang=36.0*deg,a=0;a<na;a+=N-2,ang-=72.0*deg)
        {
        p[0]=R*cos(ang);
        p[1]=R*sin(ang);
        p[2]=sz;
        i0=pnt.add(p[0],p[1],+p[2]);
        i1=pnt.add(p[0],p[1],-p[2]);
        a0=a-1;if (a0<  0) a0+=na;
        a1=a+1;if (a1>=na) a1-=na;
        ii[0]=ab[a0][b0-1]; ii[2]=ab[a1][b0-1];
        ii[1]=ab[a0][b0+1]; ii[3]=ab[a1][b0+1];
        // hexagons
        h.col=0x00008080;
        h.a=a; h.b=0;
        h.ix[0]=hex[ii[0]].ix[0];
        h.ix[1]=hex[ii[0]].ix[1];
        h.ix[2]=hex[ii[1]].ix[1];
        h.ix[3]=hex[ii[1]].ix[0];
        h.ix[4]=i0;
        h.ix[5]=i1;
        hex.add(h);
        h.a=a; h.b=0;
        h.ix[0]=hex[ii[2]].ix[2];
        h.ix[1]=hex[ii[2]].ix[1];
        h.ix[2]=hex[ii[3]].ix[1];
        h.ix[3]=hex[ii[3]].ix[2];
        h.ix[4]=i0;
        h.ix[5]=i1;
        hex.add(h);
        // pentagons
        h.col=0x000040A0;
        h.a=a; h.b=0;
        h.ix[0]=hex[ii[0]].ix[0];
        h.ix[1]=hex[ii[0]].ix[5];
        h.ix[2]=hex[ii[2]].ix[3];
        h.ix[3]=hex[ii[2]].ix[2];
        h.ix[4]=i1;
        h.ix[5]=i1;
        hex.add(h);
        h.a=a; h.b=0;
        h.ix[0]=hex[ii[1]].ix[0];
        h.ix[1]=hex[ii[1]].ix[5];
        h.ix[2]=hex[ii[3]].ix[3];
        h.ix[3]=hex[ii[3]].ix[2];
        h.ix[4]=i0;
        h.ix[5]=i0;
        hex.add(h);
        }

    // release index search table
    for (a=0;a<na;a++) delete[] ab[a];
    delete[] ab;
    }
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void hex_draw(GLuint style)     // draw hex
    {
    int i,j;
    _hexagon *h;
    for (h=hex.dat,i=0;i<hex.num;i++,h++)
        {
        if (style==GL_POLYGON) glColor4ubv((BYTE*)&h->col);
        glBegin(style);
        for (j=0;j<6;j++) glVertex3dv(pnt.pnt.dat+h->ix[j]);
        glEnd();
        }
    if (0)
    if (style==GL_POLYGON)
        {
        scr.text_init_pixel(0.1,-0.2);
        glColor3f(1.0,1.0,1.0);
        for (h=hex.dat,i=0;i<hex.num;i++,h++)
         if (abs(h->b)<2)
            {
            double p[3];
            vector_ld(p,0.0,0.0,0.0);
            for (j=0;j<6;j++)
             vector_add(p,p,pnt.pnt.dat+h->ix[j]);
            vector_mul(p,p,1.0/6.0);
            scr.text(p[0],p[1],p[2],AnsiString().sprintf("%i,%i",h->a,h->b));
            }
        scr.text_exit_pixel();
        }
    }
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void TMain::draw()
    {
    scr.cls();
    int x,y;

    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity();
    glTranslatef(0.0,0.0,-5.0);
    glRotated(animx,1.0,0.0,0.0);
    glRotated(animy,0.0,1.0,0.0);

    hex_draw(GL_POLYGON);

    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity();
    glTranslatef(0.0,0.0,-5.0+0.01);
    glRotated(animx,1.0,0.0,0.0);
    glRotated(animy,0.0,1.0,0.0);

    glColor3f(1.0,1.0,1.0);
    glLineWidth(2);
    hex_draw(GL_LINE_LOOP);
    glCirclexy(0.0,0.0,0.0,1.5);
    glLineWidth(1);

    scr.exe();
    scr.rfs();
    }
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
__fastcall TMain::TMain(TComponent* Owner) : TForm(Owner)
    {
    scr.init(this);
    hex_sphere(10,1.5);
    _redraw=true;
    }
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TMain::FormDestroy(TObject *Sender)
    {
    scr.exit();
    }
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TMain::FormPaint(TObject *Sender)
    {
    _redraw=true;
    }
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TMain::FormResize(TObject *Sender)
    {
    scr.resize();
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();
    gluPerspective(60,float(scr.xs)/float(scr.ys),0.1,100.0);
    _redraw=true;
    }
//-----------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TMain::Timer1Timer(TObject *Sender)
    {
    animx+=danimx; if (animx>=360.0) animx-=360.0; _redraw=true;
    animy+=danimy; if (animy>=360.0) animy-=360.0; _redraw=true;
    if (_redraw) { draw(); _redraw=false; }
    }
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TMain::FormKeyDown(TObject *Sender, WORD &Key, TShiftState Shift)
    {
    Caption=Key;
    if (Key==40){ animx+=2.0; _redraw=true; }
    if (Key==38){ animx-=2.0; _redraw=true; }
    if (Key==39){ animy+=2.0; _redraw=true; }
    if (Key==37){ animy-=2.0; _redraw=true; }
    }
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

I know it is a bit of a index mess and also winding rule is not guaranteed as I was too lazy to made uniform indexing. Beware the a indexes of each hex are not linear and if you want to use them to map to 2D map you would need to recompute it using atan2 on x,y of its center point position.

Here previews:

preview preview

Still some distortions are present. They are caused by fact that we using 5 triangles to connect at equator (so connection is guaranteed). That means the circumference is 5*R instead of 6.28*R. How ever this can be still improved by a field simulation. Just take all the points and add retractive forces based on their distance and bound to sphere surface. Run simulation and when the oscillations lower below threshold you got your sphere grid ...

Another option would be find out some equation to remap the grid points (similarly what I done for triangle to pie conversion) that would have better results.

  • 1
    @meowgoesthedog I am tweaking it ... and already got much much better results (using 10 direction metric instead of 5) but yes the hexagons will be a bit distorted ... that can be post-process latter with field simulation. – Spektre Oct 17 '17 at 11:11
  • 1
    @meowgoesthedog I added new preview but it is still not as good as I would like. The distortion is high due to fact that circumference of pentagon (5*R) is further away from 6.28*R then hexagon (6R)... – Spektre Oct 17 '17 at 14:03
  • 1
    @meowgoesthedog I experimented with that too some time ago see Turning a cylinder into a sphere without pinching at the poles That example does not start with icosahedron to be more compatible with the hexagon output but also distorted. The problem with that approach is that you have to use the correct start shape and number of recursions to be compatible with hexagon grid. Even then it is very hard to decide the topology even if the triangles are perfect. And icosahedron leads to nearly perfect triangles but rise a lot of other problems. – Spektre Oct 18 '17 at 14:34
  • 1
    @AaronFranke The filed sim result is a bit nicer but not enough. How ever I got an idea how to do this in much simpler manner without the copy and rotate stuff ... handling the curvature directly. Using only spherical coordinate system. Will need to code it first to see if I am right ... – Spektre Oct 20 '17 at 8:59
  • 2
    Patching half of the sphere with five triangles makes them non-equilateral. From the image of the OP I guess that the triangles are equilateral. The perspective of the close camera may make one think that the five triangles around one pentagon cover half of the sphere, but actually there are 20 triangles - corresponding to the 20 faces of an icosahedron. See also the image with 20 triangular patches in my answer. – coproc Nov 1 '17 at 14:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.