2

Here is the code I wrote in a project.

Which one is a better one to write python?

def get_list_of_university_towns():
    ....
    def parse_state(item):
        return re.sub('\[edit\]', '', item)
    uni_towns['State'] = uni_towns['State'].apply(parse_state)
    return uni_towns

Or:

def parse_state(item):
    return re.sub('\[edit\]', '', item)
def get_list_of_university_towns():
    ....
    uni_towns['State'] = uni_towns['State'].apply(parse_state)
    return uni_towns

This "parse_state(item)" function is only called once in "get_list_of_university_towns()" and will be never used again. Personally I think define it inside a function will be easier to understand. However, I barely see this kind of codes in other people's project.

So, how should I write this piece of code?

  • 2
    Or you could define a lambda function inline – khelwood Oct 17 '17 at 11:50
  • 1
    This really depends on you use-case. If you will find the function parse_state useful at other points of your code, then the second case makes more sense. – Chris Mueller Oct 17 '17 at 11:52
  • 1
    If you don't need parse_state anywhere else, I vote for defining it inside get_list_of_university_towns or using a lambda function. – timgeb Oct 17 '17 at 11:52
  • They’re more or less the same in terms of cleanliness if parse_state is meaningful enough on its own (and that it doesn’t rely on locals of get_list_of_university_towns is one sign pointing to that). (The real change is to item.replace('[edit]', ''). 😊) – Ry- Oct 17 '17 at 11:53
  • Suppose lambda is not an option ( function is too complicated) and the function will only be called once . – Phil Oct 17 '17 at 11:54
6

Is it Pythonic to write funciotns inside functions

Yes, it is. Actually, its more Pythonic to do it inside that outside in order not to pollute the module namespace.

How should I write this piece of code?

The option with the function definition inside the other function works. Another Pythonic way would be using an anonymous lambda function:

def get_list_of_university_towns():
    ....
    uni_towns['State'] = uni_towns['State'].apply(lambda item: re.sub('\[edit\]', '', item))
    return uni_towns

Optimizing

As it has been sugested, and now that you said it is a panda's dataframe what means that the function will be called more than once, you should either compile the expresion or use str.replace() instead of re.sub():

def get_list_of_university_towns():
    ....
    uni_towns['State'] = uni_towns['State'].apply(lambda item: item.replace('[edit]', ''))
    return uni_towns
  • I disagree with the second part; whether a lambda expression is better than a named function here is somewhat a matter of personal preference. – chepner Oct 17 '17 at 12:05
  • @chepner Edited to give both options the same value. I try to avoid basing my answers on personal preferences but sometimes they slip in. – Adirio Oct 17 '17 at 12:10
0

Both are fine. The first one is cleaner as you do not pollute module namespace with a name that is not used elsewhere.

And the first form should be slightly faster as parse_state is a local variable when it is called, especially important if it is used within a loop. There is no runtime cost to defining the function inside another function. At runtime, it is a simple assignment.

However, if it is used inside a loop, you should also compile the regular expression in the module scope:

_state_re = re.compile('\[edit\]')
def get_list_of_university_towns():
    ...
    def parse_state(item):
        return _state_re.sub('', item)
    uni_towns['State'] = uni_towns['State'].apply(parse_state)
    return uni_towns
0

I agree with Adirio's answer if a function is needed.

Alternatively, you could consider whether a function is really necessary if it's only used once. If it is possible to iterate over uni_towns['State'], this would achieve the same and is in my opinion more readable:

def get_list_of_university_towns():
    ....
    for state in uni_towns['State']:
        state = re.sub('\[edit\]', '', state)
    return uni_towns
  • You do not have information of what uni_town['State'] is, you only know that it has an apply method that accepts a function as a parameter. – Adirio Oct 17 '17 at 12:13
  • True, I'm assuming it's an array of strings, with the builtin iterable apply function – Lukas Ansteeg Oct 17 '17 at 12:17
  • And by an array you are mining literally a panda's array aren't you? I think that is a assumption that should not be made without asking in a comment before. – Adirio Oct 17 '17 at 12:22
  • Edited my answer to clarify that I am assuming iterating over uni_towns['State'] is a possibility. – Lukas Ansteeg Oct 17 '17 at 12:34
  • Thanks! uni_towns is a pandas DataFrame, so it's better to use the apply method. – Phil Oct 17 '17 at 12:37
-1

You don't need to create another function for what you are trying to achieve. Creating a function outside is better so that you can call it in other functions as well rather than limiting the use of it to only to where it is written.

  • If you want to do it without creating another function you would need more information about what uni_town['State'] is. Creating a fucntion outside is NOT better, you are polluting the module namespace, he already said that it won't be called from anywhere else. – Adirio Oct 17 '17 at 12:24
  • What i meant was either create a separate function or do the required changes inside the same function without creating another. Basically no need to have another function as i mentioned earlier. – python_user Oct 17 '17 at 12:36

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