3

Is there an equivalent to python "pass" in VBA to simply do nothing in the code?

for example:

For Each ws In ThisWorkbook.Sheets
    If ws.Name = "Navy Reqs" Then
        ws.Select
        nReqs = get_num_rows
        Cells(1, 1).Select
        If ActiveSheet.AutoFilterMode Then Cells.AutoFilter
        Selection.AutoFilter
    ElseIf ws.Name = "temp" Then
        pass
    Else
        ws.Select
        nShips = get_num_rows
    End If
Next

I get an error here that pass is not defined. Thanks.

  • Wow that Python pass is the single most ridiculously useless thing I've ever seen. – Mathieu Guindon Oct 17 '17 at 17:27
  • Or is it not more like some kind of continue statement (C#), i.e. it skips to the next iteration? If so, then simply reword your conditions so that you don't need any no-op code. – Mathieu Guindon Oct 17 '17 at 17:33
  • It's useful in python if you have a function or loop that is not yet implemented but you will implement in the future. Instructors use it in their code where they want their students to fill in code often – Rik Oct 17 '17 at 17:43
  • Oh wow. So yeah, the VBA equivalent to that is no code - actually, a 'not implemented yet comment would be even better. – Mathieu Guindon Oct 17 '17 at 17:44
  • Python is compiled based on indents so the lack of indent throws an error – Rik Oct 17 '17 at 17:48
8

just remove pass and re run the code. VBA will be happy to accept that I believe

  • you can also add a comment 'like this if you want to indicate that you meant to leave it blank (useful for future debugging) – SeanC Oct 17 '17 at 21:23
  • For this use case tbh, I would have omitted the sheet in the for statement, with <>. It really does depend if this was a place holder, or a sheet he wanted specifically not to include in the statement. – itChi Oct 17 '17 at 21:35
4

Just leave it blank. You can also use a Select statement, it's easier to read.

For Each ws In ThisWorkbook.Sheets
    Select Case ws.Name
        Case "Navy Reqs":
            '...

        Case "temp":
            'do nothing

        Case Else:
            '...
    End Select
Next
4

Don't include any statements:

Sub qwerty()
    If 1 = 3 Then
    Else
        MsgBox "1 does not equal 3"
    End If
End Sub
4

Write code that does what it says, and says what it does.

For Each ws In ThisWorkbook.Sheets
    If ws.Name = "Navy Reqs" Then
        ws.Select
        nReqs = get_num_rows
        Cells(1, 1).Select
        If ActiveSheet.AutoFilterMode Then Cells.AutoFilter
        Selection.AutoFilter
    Else If ws.Name <> "temp" Then
        ws.Select
        nShips = get_num_rows
    End If
Next

That's all you need. An instruction that means "here's some useless code" does not exist in VBA.

You want comments that say why, not what - a comment that says 'do nothing is the exact opposite of that. Don't write no-op code, it's pure noise.

Assuming Python's pass works like C#'s continue statement and skips to the next iteration, then the VBA equivalent is the one and only legitimate use of a GoTo jump:

    For ...    
        If ... Then GoTo Skip
        ...
Skip:
    Next
2

This code shows an IF test that keeps searching unless it gets a match.

Function EXCAT(Desc)
    Dim txt() As String

    ' Split the string at the space characters.
    txt() = Split(Desc)

    For i = 0 To UBound(txt)

        EXCAT = Application.VLookup(txt(i), Worksheets("Sheet1").Range("Dept"), 2, False)

        If IsError(EXCAT) Then Else Exit Function

    Next

    ' watch this space for composite word seach
    EXCAT = "- - tba - -"

End Function
0

I coded in COBOL for many years and the equivalent 'do nothing' statement is NEXT SENTENCE.

In VBA, I find myself creating a dummy variable (sometimes a global) dim dummy as integer and then when I need that 'do nothing' action in an If..Then..Else I put in a line of code: dummy = 0.

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  • @dippas Actually it is an answer, he suggests a different way to address the problem. Only the last sentence was misleading ... thus I took the freedom to remove it, to make the answer more clear. – GhostCat 17 hours ago

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