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I don't quite understand how negative arguments in datetime.timedelta are interpreted.

With Positive values:

>>> from datetime import timedelta
>>> d = timedelta(days=1,seconds=1,microseconds=1,milliseconds=1,minutes=1,hours=1,weeks=1)
>>> (d.days, d.seconds, d.microseconds)
>>> (8, 3661, 1001)

This is pretty straightforward. A similar example with negative values looks like:

>>> from datetime import timedelta
>>> d = timedelta(days=-1,seconds=-1,microseconds=-1,milliseconds=-1,minutes=-1,hours=-1,weeks=-1)
>>> (d.days, d.seconds, d.microseconds)
>>> (-9, 82738, 998999) 

As per my understanding seconds and microseconds are derived like:

  • seconds = 86399 - (-60-3600-1)
  • microseconds = 999999 - (-1-1000)

Is this correct? How come days equals -9?

I am reading this section of docs. But still don't quite understand the working with negative values. Please share explanations or relevant documentation links. Thanks :)

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  • It's much easier to read (and make sense of) timedelta calls if you use named arguments btw... Oct 18, 2017 at 5:42
  • Agreed and edited Oct 18, 2017 at 6:04
  • For printing datetime.timedeltas, this looks more like what most users expect imho: str(td) if td >= datetime.timedelta() else f"-{-td}"
    – Florian
    Feb 27 at 16:27

2 Answers 2

7

Because of the way timedeltas are stored internally, only the days attribute can take on negative values. This can be surprising when the timedelta is printed back. An illuminating example from the docs,

>>> d = timedelta(microseconds=-1)
>>> (d.days, d.seconds, d.microseconds)
(-1, 86399, 999999)

ie. -1d + 86399s + 999999µs = -1µs

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  • 2
    the datetime package is so badly designed..
    – ffigari
    Nov 15, 2021 at 14:57
4

It makes complete sense, (-1 week + -1 day) + (-1 hours) + (-1 minutes) + (-1 seconds) + (-1 milliseconds) + (-1 microseconds) equals to: (-8 days) + (-1 hours) + (-1 minutes) + (-1 seconds) + (-1 milliseconds) + (-1 microseconds)

By having less than -8 days, with -1 hours, -1 minutes, ... the number of days will have to be even less than -8 to make the negative hours, minutes, seconds... into positive hours, minutes, seconds....(since only days can be represented negatively, others,such as seconds, are always represented positively). Which means that days will have to be -9.

If you print d , you will get -9 days 22:58:58.998999, with negative 9 days and positive 22+ hours. Seeing the str of the timedelta could help you have better understanding of how negative timedelta is represented.

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  • the resultant number of days are -8, but due to negative hours, mins, secs... the days become -9. So everytime days are decremented by 1 if there are negative hours, mins secs? What if some of the arguments are non-negative? Oct 18, 2017 at 6:15
  • 1
    Imagine the timedelta is on a number line that has an increment of one day, if the days itself is negative -8, and and the decimals are still negative, the days will bounce to the next left whole, since only days can be negative. If the days is -8, and others (not including weeks) or the sum of others are positive, then days will remain -8. timedelta(days=-1, seconds=1, weeks=-1) the number of days would remain -8, as there’s a positive second, timedelta(days=-1, minutes=1, seconds=-1, weeks=-1) the number of days is still -8 because the sum of 1 minute and -1 second is positive 59 minutes
    – Taku
    Oct 18, 2017 at 14:47

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