11

I have a function taking a variadic parameter pack and at the beginning I want to check that all elements compare equal. Can I somehow use the new C++17 fold-expressions to write that succinctly as a one-liner? I was thinking

template<typename... Args>
void func (Args... args)
{
    ASSERT ((args == ...));

    // more code here...
}

but this doesn't work, as it compiles to code that first properly compares the last two arguments, but then compares the third-last argument to the result of the first comparison, which is a bool. What use-case could this type of fold expression possibly have (similar for args < ...)? Is there any chance I can avoid writing a dedicated recursive template to do this?

  • 8
    ((arg == args) && ...) if you can prepend the function parameter list with arg – Piotr Skotnicki Oct 18 '17 at 9:09
23

The reason that doesn't work, unfortunately, is due to the fact that boolean operators don't chain in C++ like they do in other languages. So the expression:

a == (b == c)

(what your fold-expression would expand to) would compare a to either true or false, nothing to do with what b or c actually are. I was hoping the operator<=> would add chaining but apparently that part was dropped.

The fixes are that you have to break up the comparisons:

(a == b) && (b == c)

Of course that doesn't lend itself to folding very well, but you could instead compare everything to the first element:

(a == b) && (a == c)

Which is to say:

((a0 == args) && ... )

At that point, we just need to be able to pull out the first element. No problem, that's obviously what lambdas are for:

template <class... Args>
constexpr bool all_equal(Args const&... args) {
    if constexpr (sizeof...(Args) == 0) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return [](auto const& a0, auto const&... rest){
            return ((a0 == rest) && ...);
        }(args...);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
7

As suggested by Piotr Skotnicki, a simple solution is separate the first argument from the followings and check it with using && as fold operator

By example, the following function that return true if all arguments are equals

template <typename A0, typename ... Args>
bool foo (A0 const & a0, Args const & ... args)
 { return ( (args == a0) && ... && true ); } 

Unfortunately this can't work with an empty list of arguments

std::cout << foo(1, 1, 1, 1) << std::endl; // print 1
std::cout << foo(1, 1, 2, 1) << std::endl; // print 0
std::cout << foo() << std::endl;           // compilation error

but you can add the special empty argument foo()

bool foo ()
 { return true; }

If, for some reason, you can't split the args in a a0 and the following args?

Well... you can obviously use the preceding foo() function (with special empty version)

template<typename... Args>
void func (Args... args)
{
    ASSERT (foo(args));

    // more code here...
}

or you can use the C++17 fold expression with comma operator and assignment as in the following bar()

template <typename ... Args>
bool bar (Args const & ... args)
 {
   auto a0 = ( (0, ..., args) );
   return ( (args == a0) && ... && true ); 
 }

Observe the initial zero in a0 assignment that permit the use of this solution also with an empty list of arguments.

Unfortunately, from the preceding auto a0 assignment I get a lot of warnings ("expression result unused", from clang++, and "left operand of comma operator has no effect", from g++) that I don't know how to avoid.

The following is a full working example

#include <iostream>

template <typename A0, typename ... Args>
bool foo (A0 const & a0, Args const & ... args)
 { return ( (args == a0) && ... && true ); }

bool foo ()
 { return true; }

template <typename ... Args>
bool bar (Args const & ... args)
 {
   auto a0 = ( (0, ..., args) );
   return ( (args == a0) && ... && true ); 
 }

int main ()
 {
   std::cout << foo(1, 1, 1, 1) << std::endl; // print 1
   std::cout << foo(1, 1, 2, 1) << std::endl; // print 0
   std::cout << foo() << std::endl;           // print 1 (compilation error
                                              //          witout no argument
                                              //          version)

   std::cout << bar(1, 1, 1, 1) << std::endl; // print 1
   std::cout << bar(1, 1, 2, 1) << std::endl; // print 0
   std::cout << bar() << std::endl;           // print 1 (no special version)
 }

-- EDIT --

As pointed by dfri (thanks!), for and empty args... pack, the values for the following folded expressions

( (args == a0) && ... )

( (args == a0) || ... )

are, respectively, true and false.

So return instruction of foo() and bar() can be indifferently written

 return ( (args == a0) && ... && true );

or

 return ( (args == a0) && ... );

and this is true also in case sizeof...(args) == 0U.

But I tend to forget this sort of details and prefer to explicit (with the final && true) the empty-case value.

| improve this answer | |
  • Note that the value for a unary fold over an empty pack, using specifically &&, is true (conversely, false for ||), so bar(...)'s return (return ( (args == a0) && ... && true );) needn't have the trailing true, and can be simplified to return ( (args == a0) && ...);. Also, "Observe the initial zero in a0 assignment that permit the use of this solution also with an empty list of arguments." <-- isn't the initial value simply to shift a0 one "element" as compared to the args pack (to allow comparing adjacent elements)? – dfrib Oct 18 '17 at 13:00
  • @dfri - Regarding && and true: yes, I know (now) this, but I tend to forget this sort of details; I think it's better (for me and other forgetful people like me) explicit the default value (and i suppose the compiler optimize and delete the final && true); but you're right and maybe I add a comment. Regarding the "initial zero"... sorry but I don't understand (my fault, I suppose) what do you mean). – max66 Oct 18 '17 at 15:12
  • Regarding the second part: it's probably me that should say "my fault", as I don't really understand the sentence I quoted: what is the significance of the 0 value w.r.t. being able to call bar(...) with an empty pack (bar())? As I understand, the initial 0 value (which may as well be -42) is used mainly so that the fold expression compares each "adjacent element" of the initial pack (such that a0 itself is a "shifted-by-one" parameter pack). But I feel that I'm probably missing the logic for this one. – dfrib Oct 18 '17 at 15:31
  • @dfri - To understand the logic of the initial zero, try to compile my full example removing it (using auto a0 = ( (..., args) );). From the bar() empty call (last std::cout row) you should obtain an error similar to "error: variable has incomplete type 'void'". And now think how is expanded an empty pack. With the initial zero, is expanded as auto as = 0;, that is correct and compile. Without the initial zero, is expanded as auto as = ;, that is wrong and give an error. – max66 Oct 18 '17 at 15:37
  • I see, thanks; so we're actually after the type inferred from the 0 literal (whereas we never use it's value) in case of an empty pack. In such case, could std::nullopt from <optional> be preferable (for semantics)? – dfrib Oct 18 '17 at 16:16

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