18

Given a string in Ruby 1.8.7 (without the awesome Oniguruma regular expression engine that supports Unicode properties with \p{}), I would like to be able to determine if the string contains one or more Chinese, Japanese, or Korean characters; i.e.

class String
  def contains_cjk?
    ...
  end
end

>> '日本語'.contains_cjk?
=> true
>> '광고 프로그램'.contains_cjk?
=> true
>> '艾弗森将退出篮坛'.contains_cjk?
=> true
>> 'Watashi ha bakana gaijin desu.'.contains_cjk?
=> false

I suspect that this will boil down to seeing if any of the characters in the string are in the Unihan CJKV Unicode blocks, but I figured it was worth asking if anyone knows of an existing solution in Ruby.

2
  • Are you using version 1.9 of Ruby, or just an older version without good Unicode regex support? If you’re using 1.9, you should have access to (some) Unicode properties, like \p{InCJKUnifiedIdeographs} or maybe even \p{Han}.
    – tchrist
    Commented Jan 13, 2011 at 14:57
  • 1.8.7 without Oniguruma; updated the question. Commented Jan 13, 2011 at 15:23

4 Answers 4

49

(ruby 1.9.2)

#encoding: UTF-8
class String
  def contains_cjk?
    !!(self =~ /\p{Han}|\p{Katakana}|\p{Hiragana}|\p{Hangul}/)
  end
end

strings= ['日本', '광고 프로그램', '艾弗森将退出篮坛', 'Watashi ha bakana gaijin desu.']
strings.each{|s| puts s.contains_cjk?}

#true
#true
#true
#false

\p{} matches a character’s Unicode script.
The following scripts are supported: Arabic, Armenian, Balinese, Bengali, Bopomofo, Braille, Buginese, Buhid, Canadian_Aboriginal, Carian, Cham, Cherokee, Common, Coptic, Cuneiform, Cypriot, Cyrillic, Deseret, Devanagari, Ethiopic, Georgian, Glagolitic, Gothic, Greek, Gujarati, Gurmukhi, Han, Hangul, Hanunoo, Hebrew, Hiragana, Inherited, Kannada, Katakana, Kayah_Li, Kharoshthi, Khmer, Lao, Latin, Lepcha, Limbu, Linear_B, Lycian, Lydian, Malayalam, Mongolian, Myanmar, New_Tai_Lue, Nko, Ogham, Ol_Chiki, Old_Italic, Old_Persian, Oriya, Osmanya, Phags_Pa, Phoenician, Rejang, Runic, Saurashtra, Shavian, Sinhala, Sundanese, Syloti_Nagri, Syriac, Tagalog, Tagbanwa, Tai_Le, Tamil, Telugu, Thaana, Thai, Tibetan, Tifinagh, Ugaritic, Vai, and Yi.

Wow. Ruby Regexp source .

7
  • This definitely works in Ruby 1.9, or Ruby 1.8 with the Oniguruma regex engine. I'm using 1.8.7 without Oniguruma, tragically. :( Great solution, even though it does not help me in this particular case. Commented Jan 13, 2011 at 15:21
  • 2
    I had to add '# encoding: UTF-8' to the top of the file to make this work. Otherwise I got a invalid character property name error.
    – Morrowless
    Commented Sep 6, 2011 at 16:01
  • 1
    Makes more sense to do [p{Han}\p{Katakana}\p{Hiragana}\p{Hangul}].
    – tchrist
    Commented Jun 4, 2012 at 2:21
  • @tchrist that results in false, true, false, true.
    – steenslag
    Commented Jun 23, 2012 at 22:42
  • 1
    @steenslag Then there’s a bug, because /a|b|c|d/ cannot get a different answer from what [abcd] gets when each one of those a,b,c,d is a single character or something that matches a single character, like \w or \p{Han}. Best check it out very very carefully.
    – tchrist
    Commented Jun 24, 2012 at 1:48
9

Given my Ruby 1.8.7 constraint, this is the best I could do:

class String
  CJKV_RANGES = [
      (0xe2ba80..0xe2bbbf),
      (0xe2bfb0..0xe2bfbf),
      (0xe38080..0xe380bf),
      (0xe38180..0xe383bf),
      (0xe38480..0xe386bf),
      (0xe38780..0xe387bf),
      (0xe38880..0xe38bbf),
      (0xe38c80..0xe38fbf),
      (0xe39080..0xe4b6bf),
      (0xe4b780..0xe4b7bf),
      (0xe4b880..0xe9bfbf),
      (0xea8080..0xea98bf),
      (0xeaa080..0xeaaebf),
      (0xeaaf80..0xefbfbf),
  ]

  def contains_cjkv?
    each_char do |ch|
      return true if CJKV_RANGES.any? {|range| range.member? ch.unpack('H*').first.hex }
    end
    false
  end
end


strings = ['日本', '광고 프로그램', '艾弗森将退出篮坛', 'Watashi ha bakana gaijin desu.']
strings.each {|s| puts s.contains_cjkv? }

#true
#true
#true
#false

Pretty hacktacular, but it works. It actually detects a variety of Indic scripts as well, so it should probably really be called contains_asian?

Maybe I should gem this up for other poor I18N hackers stuck with Ruby 1.8.

2
  • I think others may find it helpful.
    – Geo
    Commented Nov 29, 2011 at 7:29
  • I have a project stuck on 1.8, too. This solution didn't work for me, but I adapted a solution from another Stack Overflow thread – see my answer here.
    – Henrik N
    Commented Dec 14, 2013 at 18:03
1

I've written a little gem that packages up the approach in steenslag's answer above:

https://github.com/jpatokal/script_detector

It can also take a stab at differentiating between Japanese, Korean, simplified Chinese and traditional Chinese, although due to the complexities of Han unification it only works reliably with large slabs of text.

1
  • I wonder if it's the most up-to-date library.
    – Nakilon
    Commented Aug 21, 2023 at 4:33
0

Ruby 1.8 solution based on this code and using the API from Josh Glover's solution on this thread:

class String
  CJKV_RANGES = [
    (0x4E00..0x9FFF),
    (0x3400..0x4DBF),
    (0x20000..0x2A6DF),
    (0x2A700..0x2B73F),
  ]

  def contains_cjkv?
    unpack("U*").any? { |char|
      CJKV_RANGES.any? { |range| range.member?(char) }
    }
  end
end

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