94

I've written the following routine to manually traverse through a directory and calculate its size in C#/.NET:


protected static float CalculateFolderSize(string folder)
{
    float folderSize = 0.0f;
    try
    {
        //Checks if the path is valid or not
        if (!Directory.Exists(folder))
            return folderSize;
        else
        {
            try
            {
                foreach (string file in Directory.GetFiles(folder))
                {
                    if (File.Exists(file))
                    {
                        FileInfo finfo = new FileInfo(file);
                        folderSize += finfo.Length;
                    }
                }

                foreach (string dir in Directory.GetDirectories(folder))
                    folderSize += CalculateFolderSize(dir);
            }
            catch (NotSupportedException e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Unable to calculate folder size: {0}", e.Message);
            }
        }
    }
    catch (UnauthorizedAccessException e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Unable to calculate folder size: {0}", e.Message);
    }
    return folderSize;
}

I have an application which is running this routine repeatedly for a large number of folders. I'm wondering if there's a more efficient way to calculate the size of a folder with .NET? I didn't see anything specific in the framework. Should I be using P/Invoke and a Win32 API? What's the most efficient way of calculating the size of a folder in .NET?

24 Answers 24

88

No, this looks like the recommended way to calculate directory size, the relevent method included below:

public static long DirSize(DirectoryInfo d) 
{    
    long size = 0;    
    // Add file sizes.
    FileInfo[] fis = d.GetFiles();
    foreach (FileInfo fi in fis) 
    {      
        size += fi.Length;    
    }
    // Add subdirectory sizes.
    DirectoryInfo[] dis = d.GetDirectories();
    foreach (DirectoryInfo di in dis) 
    {
        size += DirSize(di);   
    }
    return size;  
}

You would call with the root as:

Console.WriteLine("The size is {0} bytes.", DirSize(new DirectoryInfo(targetFolder));

...where targetFolder is the folder-size to calculate.

9
  • search for "The following code example demonstrates how to calculate the size of a directory;" and it's the same as the above example.
    – brandeded
    Commented Aug 22, 2011 at 19:04
  • 1
    Updated link, fwiw.
    – ladenedge
    Commented Aug 27, 2012 at 1:45
  • 1
    @ladenedge updated link? That one takes you to v2.0 ... Answer link is correct.
    – kzfabi
    Commented Jan 8, 2013 at 14:59
  • BTW: the recommended way link no longer contains the example. Seems like MSDN has been updated and that one got lost.
    – kzfabi
    Commented Jan 8, 2013 at 15:01
  • 7
    Use EnumerateFiles and EnumerateDirectories Commented Apr 8, 2016 at 7:41
53
DirectoryInfo dirInfo = new DirectoryInfo(@strDirPath);
long dirSize = await Task.Run(() => dirInfo.EnumerateFiles( "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Sum(file => file.Length));
5
  • 1
    This gets "UnauthorizedAccess exception" check this: stackoverflow.com/questions/8877516/…
    – BenSabry
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 9:16
  • @AhmedSabry: what do you understand from this bug. Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 4:00
  • It needs a permission on this path
    – BenSabry
    Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 14:57
  • @AhmedSabry exactly, that's why this 1-liner is good. If all permissions are good, great. If not, it will fail and you don't need specific custom try..catch, you'll know what problem you have.
    – Ofer Zelig
    Commented Jan 29, 2019 at 2:41
  • This throws if the full path of a subdirectory gets too long Commented Sep 11, 2019 at 8:24
27

I do not believe there is a Win32 API to calculate the space consumed by a directory, although I stand to be corrected on this. If there were then I would assume Explorer would use it. If you get the Properties of a large directory in Explorer, the time it takes to give you the folder size is proportional to the number of files/sub-directories it contains.

Your routine seems fairly neat & simple. Bear in mind that you are calculating the sum of the file lengths, not the actual space consumed on the disk. Space consumed by wasted space at the end of clusters, file streams etc, are being ignored.

5
19

The real question is, what do you intend to use the size for?

Your first problem is that there are at least four definitions for "file size":

  • The "end of file" offset, which is the number of bytes you have to skip to go from the beginning to the end of the file.
    In other words, it is the number of bytes logically in the file (from a usage perspective).

  • The "valid data length", which is equal to the offset of the first byte which is not actually stored.
    This is always less than or equal to the "end of file", and is a multiple of the cluster size.
    For example, a 1 GB file can have a valid data length of 1 MB. If you ask Windows to read the first 8 MB, it will read the first 1 MB and pretend the rest of the data was there, returning it as zeros.

  • The "allocated size" of a file. This is always greater than or equal to the "end of file".
    This is the number of clusters that the OS has allocated for the file, multiplied by the cluster size.
    Unlike the case where the "end of file" is greater than the "valid data length", The excess bytes are not considered to be part of the file's data, so the OS will not fill a buffer with zeros if you try to read in the allocated region beyond the end of the file.

  • The "compressed size" of a file, which is only valid for compressed (and sparse?) files.
    It is equal to the size of a cluster, multiplied by the number of clusters on the volume that are actually allocated to this file.
    For non-compressed and non-sparse files, there is no notion of "compressed size"; you would use the "allocated size" instead.

Your second problem is that a "file" like C:\Foo can actually have multiple streams of data.
This name just refers to the default stream. A file might have alternate streams, like C:\Foo:Bar, whose size is not even shown in Explorer!

Your third problem is that a "file" can have multiple names ("hard links").
For example, C:\Windows\notepad.exe and C:\Windows\System32\notepad.exe are two names for the same file. Any name can be used to open any stream of the file.

Your fourth problem is that a "file" (or directory) might in fact not even be a file (or directory):
It might be a soft link (a "symbolic link" or a "reparse point") to some other file (or directory).
That other file might not even be on the same drive. It might even point to something on the network, or it might even be recursive! Should the size be infinity if it's recursive?

Your fifth is that there are "filter" drivers that make certain files or directories look like actual files or directories, even though they aren't. For example, Microsoft's WIM image files (which are compressed) can be "mounted" on a folder using a tool called ImageX, and those do not look like reparse points or links. They look just like directories -- except that the're not actually directories, and the notion of "size" doesn't really make sense for them.

Your sixth problem is that every file requires metadata.
For example, having 10 names for the same file requires more metadata, which requires space. If the file names are short, having 10 names might be as cheap as having 1 name -- and if they're long, then having multiple names can use more disk space for the metadata. (Same story with multiple streams, etc.)
Do you count these, too?

2
  • 10
    I'm confused. This is not an answer, it's a (rather long) question, or multiple thereof.
    – Ofer Zelig
    Commented Jan 29, 2019 at 2:42
  • 2
    Although it is not an answer yet, it takes us a great leap forward to finding the answer. Commented Nov 30, 2021 at 7:36
18
public static long DirSize(DirectoryInfo dir)
{
    return dir.GetFiles().Sum(fi => fi.Length) +
           dir.GetDirectories().Sum(di => DirSize(di));
}
7
  • 1
    This solution has several issues, one of the beeing the lack of termination for recursively symlinked directories on NTFS (aka Junction Points) and Unix-SMB shares.
    – mbx
    Commented Aug 28, 2013 at 7:26
  • 1
    I agree. What are the others?
    – Grozz
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 17:32
  • 2
    PathTooLongException (see this blogpost) and missing credentials to read from certain subdirs (UnauthorizedAccessException) come to mind. A less important issue should be removable drives (USB Sticks etc.) unplugged while operating. Exception handling here is a must - just return 0 locally and log the error(s) if the summed result should be of any value. BTW: Applied on a remote share it may look like a DOS attack. I'm sure I missed at least one other case :-)
    – mbx
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 19:05
  • When handling these known Exceptions, I still get a StackOverflowException for larger drives.
    – mbx
    Commented Sep 4, 2013 at 19:09
  • 2
    I think throwing in all those cases is acceptable and thus default behavior is fine. StackOverflowException is the only one that should be dealt with, although I do not believe that it can be reached without recursive symlinks.
    – Grozz
    Commented Sep 5, 2013 at 2:32
16
var size = new DirectoryInfo("E:\\").GetDirectorySize();

and here's the code behind this Extension method

public static long GetDirectorySize(this System.IO.DirectoryInfo directoryInfo, bool recursive = true)
{
    var startDirectorySize = default(long);
    if (directoryInfo == null || !directoryInfo.Exists)
        return startDirectorySize; //Return 0 while Directory does not exist.

    //Add size of files in the Current Directory to main size.
    foreach (var fileInfo in directoryInfo.GetFiles())
        System.Threading.Interlocked.Add(ref startDirectorySize, fileInfo.Length);

    if (recursive) //Loop on Sub Direcotries in the Current Directory and Calculate it's files size.
        System.Threading.Tasks.Parallel.ForEach(directoryInfo.GetDirectories(), (subDirectory) =>
    System.Threading.Interlocked.Add(ref startDirectorySize, GetDirectorySize(subDirectory, recursive)));

    return startDirectorySize;  //Return full Size of this Directory.
}
1
  • 2
    This code runs faster than any answer which utilize EnumerateFiles() in my case.
    – Rm558
    Commented Jun 12, 2020 at 4:48
7

More faster! Add COM reference "Windows Script Host Object..."

public double GetWSHFolderSize(string Fldr)
    {
        //Reference "Windows Script Host Object Model" on the COM tab.
        IWshRuntimeLibrary.FileSystemObject FSO = new     IWshRuntimeLibrary.FileSystemObject();
        double FldrSize = (double)FSO.GetFolder(Fldr).Size;
        Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(FSO);
        return FldrSize;
    }
private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string folderPath = @"C:\Windows";
        Stopwatch sWatch = new Stopwatch();

        sWatch.Start();
        double sizeOfDir = GetWSHFolderSize(folderPath);
        sWatch.Stop();
        MessageBox.Show("Directory size in Bytes : " + sizeOfDir + ", Time: " + sWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
          }
3
  • OK good. But it seems it gives the Files Size and not the real size on disk ( I have a case where size is 18154 bytes and the size on disk is 163840 bytes ! )
    – NGI
    Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 9:38
  • Life saver! Second time COM has saved me. I really need to consider these more, works perfectly thanks!
    – WiiLF
    Commented Oct 21, 2021 at 8:31
  • doesn't handle errors Commented Nov 15, 2022 at 8:27
7

It appears, that following method performs your task faster, than recursive function:

long size = 0;
DirectoryInfo dir = new DirectoryInfo(folder);
foreach (FileInfo fi in dir.GetFiles("*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
{
   size += fi.Length;
}

A simple console application test shows, that this loop sums files faster, than recursive function, and provides the same result. And you probably want to use LINQ methods (like Sum()) to shorten this code.

2
  • In my tests with a directory containing source code and many hidden files (svn directory), results are different than reported by file system explorer. Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 16:23
  • 5
    as always use "*" instead of "*.*" for files without extenstion
    – Bernhard
    Commented Sep 5, 2019 at 13:44
6

this solution works very well. it's collecting all the sub folders:

Directory.GetFiles(@"MainFolderPath", "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Sum(t => (new FileInfo(t).Length));
5

I extended @Hao's answer using the same counting principal but supporting richer data return, so you get back size, recursive size, directory count, and recursive directory count, N levels deep.

public class DiskSizeUtil
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Calculate disk space usage under <paramref name="root"/>.  If <paramref name="levels"/> is provided, 
    /// then return subdirectory disk usages as well, up to <paramref name="levels"/> levels deep.
    /// If levels is not provided or is 0, return a list with a single element representing the
    /// directory specified by <paramref name="root"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static FolderSizeInfo GetDirectorySize(DirectoryInfo root, int levels = 0)
    {
        var currentDirectory = new FolderSizeInfo();

        // Add file sizes.
        FileInfo[] fis = root.GetFiles();
        currentDirectory.Size = 0;
        foreach (FileInfo fi in fis)
        {
            currentDirectory.Size += fi.Length;
        }

        // Add subdirectory sizes.
        DirectoryInfo[] dis = root.GetDirectories();

        currentDirectory.Path = root;
        currentDirectory.SizeWithChildren = currentDirectory.Size;
        currentDirectory.DirectoryCount = dis.Length;
        currentDirectory.DirectoryCountWithChildren = dis.Length;
        currentDirectory.FileCount = fis.Length;
        currentDirectory.FileCountWithChildren = fis.Length;

        if (levels >= 0)
            currentDirectory.Children = new List<FolderSizeInfo>();

        foreach (DirectoryInfo di in dis)
        {
            var dd = GetDirectorySize(di, levels - 1);
            if (levels >= 0)
                currentDirectory.Children.Add(dd);

            currentDirectory.SizeWithChildren += dd.SizeWithChildren;
            currentDirectory.DirectoryCountWithChildren += dd.DirectoryCountWithChildren;
            currentDirectory.FileCountWithChildren += dd.FileCountWithChildren;
        }

        return currentDirectory;
    }

    public class FolderSizeInfo
    {
        public DirectoryInfo Path { get; set; }
        public long SizeWithChildren { get; set; }
        public long Size { get; set; }
        public int DirectoryCount { get; set; }
        public int DirectoryCountWithChildren { get; set; }
        public int FileCount { get; set; }
        public int FileCountWithChildren { get; set; }
        public List<FolderSizeInfo> Children { get; set; }
    }
}
5

An alternative to Trikaldarshi's one line solution. (It avoids having to construct FileInfo objects)

long sizeInBytes = Directory.EnumerateFiles("{path}","*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Sum(fileInfo => new FileInfo(fileInfo).Length);
3
  • the variable fileInfo is of type string not FileInfo.
    – user425678
    Commented Nov 28, 2018 at 9:11
  • Isn't it constructing many many FileInfo objects? Commented Nov 30, 2021 at 7:28
  • Note that this gives you the "size" and not the "size on disk", which is always a bit higher Commented Apr 29, 2022 at 13:42
4

I've been fiddling with VS2008 and LINQ up until recently and this compact and short method works great for me (example is in VB.NET; requires LINQ / .NET FW 3.5+ of course):

Dim size As Int64 = (From strFile In My.Computer.FileSystem.GetFiles(strFolder, _
              FileIO.SearchOption.SearchAllSubDirectories) _
              Select New System.IO.FileInfo(strFile).Length).Sum()

Its short, it searches sub-directories and is simple to understand if you know LINQ syntax. You could even specify wildcards to search for specific files using the third parameter of the .GetFiles function.

I'm not a C# expert but you can add the My namespace on C# this way.

I think this way of obtaining a folder size is not only shorter and more modern than the way described on Hao's link, it basically uses the same loop-of-FileInfo method described there in the end.

2
  • C#: return Directory.GetFiles(directory, "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Sum(x => (double)(new FileInfo(x).Length));
    – thomas nn
    Commented Sep 19, 2011 at 10:19
  • 3
    This is not ideal because it will fail if any directory is denied access and it can't ignore this exception.
    – newman
    Commented Mar 21, 2013 at 2:57
4

This it the best way to calculate the size of a directory. Only other way would still use recursion but be a bit easier to use and isn't as flexible.

float folderSize = 0.0f;
FileInfo[] files = Directory.GetFiles(folder, "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories);
foreach(FileInfo file in files) folderSize += file.Length;
2
  • 4
    The code posted does not work, as Joe has also said. You have to use DirectoryInfo, not Directory, to get FileInfo array. Also the enumeration is SearchOption, not SearchOptions.
    – Tony
    Commented Aug 14, 2012 at 12:14
  • You could use Array.ConvertAll<string, FileInfo>(Directory.GetFiles(folder, "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories), x => new FileInfo(x));
    – PJRobot
    Commented May 18, 2018 at 12:10
3
public static long GetDirSize(string path)
{
    try
    {
        return Directory.EnumerateFiles(path).Sum(x => new FileInfo(x).Length)  
            +
               Directory.EnumerateDirectories(path).Sum(x => GetDirSize(x));
    }
    catch
    {
        return 0L;
    }
}
2

As far as the best algorithm goes you probably have it right. I would recommend that you unravel the recursive function and use a stack of your own (remember a stack overflow is the end of the world in a .Net 2.0+ app, the exception can not be caught IIRC).

The most important thing is that if you are using it in any form of a UI put it on a worker thread that signals the UI thread with updates.

2

To improve the performance, you could use the Task Parallel Library (TPL). Here is a good sample: Directory file size calculation - how to make it faster?

I didn't test it, but the author says it is 3 times faster than a non-multithreaded method...

2
Directory.GetFiles(@"C:\Users\AliBayat","*",SearchOption.AllDirectories)
.Select (d => new FileInfo(d))
.Select (d => new { Directory = d.DirectoryName,FileSize = d.Length} )
.ToLookup (d => d.Directory )
.Select (d => new { Directory = d.Key,TotalSizeInMB =Math.Round(d.Select (x =>x.FileSize)
.Sum () /Math.Pow(1024.0,2),2)})
.OrderByDescending (d => d.TotalSizeInMB).ToList();

Calling GetFiles with SearchOption.AllDirectories returns the full name of all the files in all the subdirectories of the specified directory. The OS represents the size of files in bytes. You can retrieve the file’s size from its Length property. Dividing it by 1024 raised to the power of 2 gives you the size of the file in megabytes. Because a directory/folder can contain many files, d.Select(x => x.FileSize) returns a collection of file sizes measured in megabytes. The final call to Sum() finds the total size of the files in the specified directory.

Update: the filterMask="." does not work with files without extension

2

Multi thread example to calculate directory size from Microsoft Docs, which would be faster

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

public class Example
{
   public static void Main()
   {
      long totalSize = 0;

      String[] args = Environment.GetCommandLineArgs();
      if (args.Length == 1) {
         Console.WriteLine("There are no command line arguments.");
         return;
      }
      if (! Directory.Exists(args[1])) {
         Console.WriteLine("The directory does not exist.");
         return;
      }

      String[] files = Directory.GetFiles(args[1]);
      Parallel.For(0, files.Length,
                   index => { FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(files[index]);
                              long size = fi.Length;
                              Interlocked.Add(ref totalSize, size);
                   } );
      Console.WriteLine("Directory '{0}':", args[1]);
      Console.WriteLine("{0:N0} files, {1:N0} bytes", files.Length, totalSize);
   }
}
// The example displaysoutput like the following:
//       Directory 'c:\windows\':
//       32 files, 6,587,222 bytes

This example only calculate the files in current folder, so if you want to calculate all the files recursively, you can change the

String[] files = Directory.GetFiles(args[1]);

to

String[] files = Directory.GetFiles(args[1], "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories);

1

The fastest way that I came up is using EnumerateFiles with SearchOption.AllDirectories. This method also allows updating the UI while going through the files and counting the size. Long path names don't cause any problems since FileInfo or DirectoryInfo are not tried to be created for the long path name. While enumerating files even though the filename is long the FileInfo returned by the EnumerateFiles don't cause problems as long as the starting directory name is not too long. There is still a problem with UnauthorizedAccess.

    private void DirectoryCountEnumTest(string sourceDirName)
    {
        // Get the subdirectories for the specified directory.
        long dataSize = 0;
        long fileCount = 0;
        string prevText = richTextBox1.Text;

        if (Directory.Exists(sourceDirName))
        {
            DirectoryInfo dir = new DirectoryInfo(sourceDirName);
            foreach (FileInfo file in dir.EnumerateFiles("*", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
            {
                fileCount++;
                try
                {
                    dataSize += file.Length;
                    richTextBox1.Text = prevText + ("\nCounting size: " + dataSize.ToString());
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    richTextBox1.AppendText("\n" + e.Message);
                }
            }
            richTextBox1.AppendText("\n files:" + fileCount.ToString());
        }
    }
1

This .NET core command line app here calculates directory sizes for a given path:

https://github.com/garethrbrown/folder-size

The key method is this one which recursively inspects sub-directories to come up with a total size.

private static long DirectorySize(SortDirection sortDirection, DirectoryInfo directoryInfo, DirectoryData directoryData)
{
        long directorySizeBytes = 0;

        // Add file sizes for current directory

        FileInfo[] fileInfos = directoryInfo.GetFiles();

        foreach (FileInfo fileInfo in fileInfos)
        {
            directorySizeBytes += fileInfo.Length;
        }

        directoryData.Name = directoryInfo.Name;

        directoryData.SizeBytes += directorySizeBytes;

        // Recursively add subdirectory sizes

        DirectoryInfo[] subDirectories = directoryInfo.GetDirectories();

        foreach (DirectoryInfo di in subDirectories)
        {
            var subDirectoryData = new DirectoryData(sortDirection);

            directoryData.DirectoryDatas.Add(subDirectoryData);

            directorySizeBytes += DirectorySize(sortDirection, di, subDirectoryData);
        }

        directoryData.SizeBytes = directorySizeBytes;

        return directorySizeBytes;
    }
}
1

In this link https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/office/vba/language/reference/user-interface-help/size-property-filesystemobject-object there is a description of how to get the folder size directly using Visual Basic, without having to get a list of files and loop over them to add up their lengths.

Sub ShowFolderSize(filespec)
    Dim fs, f, s
    Set fs = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    Set f = fs.GetFolder(filespec)
    s = UCase(f.Name) & " uses " & f.size & " bytes."
    MsgBox s, 0, "Folder Size Info"
End Sub

In a c# project, you can also add a reference to Microsoft Scripting and use the FileSystemObject.

Here is a routine for c# to use this method to output the sizes of all the folders in the given path. It recurses up to a specified level, examining subfolders whose size is larger than average in an attempt to find where storage use problems are caused.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace ShowFolderSizes
{
    public class ShowFolderSizesMain
    {
        double GBFactor = 1024.0 * 1024.0 * 1024.0;
        Scripting.FileSystemObject fileSystemObject = new Scripting.FileSystemObject();

        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ShowFolderSizesMain instance = new ShowFolderSizesMain();
            instance.Run(args);
        }

        void Run(string[] args)
        {
            if (args.Length != 2)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Usage: ShowFolderSizes path levels");
                return;
            }
            string path = args[0];
            if (!Int32.TryParse(args[1], out int levels))
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"Can't interpret {args[1]} as an integer.");
                return;
            }
            writeFolderSizes(path, levels);
            //Console.WriteLine("Press any key to continue...");
            //Console.ReadKey();
        }

        public void writeFolderSizes(string topPath, int levels)
        {
            List<string> folderNames;
            try
            {
                folderNames = new List<string>(Directory.GetDirectories(topPath));
            }
            catch (System.UnauthorizedAccessException e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"Can't access {topPath}");
                return;
            }
            if (folderNames.Count == 0)
            {
                return;
            }

            var dic = new Dictionary<string, long>();
            double sum = 0.0;
            foreach (string folderPath in folderNames)
            {
                Scripting.Folder folder = fileSystemObject.GetFolder(folderPath);
                try
                {
                    dynamic dsize = folder.Size;
                    long size = Convert.ToInt64(dsize);
                    dic.Add(folderPath, size);
                    sum += Convert.ToDouble(size);
                }
                catch (System.Security.SecurityException e)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine($"Can't access {folderPath}");
                    dic.Remove(folderPath);
                }
            }
            sum = sum / GBFactor;
            double avg = (sum / folderNames.Count);

            Console.WriteLine($"{topPath} {sum.ToString("0.000")} GB:");
            var sortedResults = (
                    from KeyValuePair<string, long> kvp in dic
                    orderby kvp.Value descending
                    select kvp);
            foreach (KeyValuePair<string, long> kvp in sortedResults)
            {
                double gb = Convert.ToDouble(kvp.Value) / GBFactor;
                Console.WriteLine($"{gb.ToString("000.000")} GB {kvp.Key}");
            }
            Console.WriteLine();

            if (levels > 0)
            {
                long cutoff = Convert.ToInt64(avg * GBFactor);
                var foldersToRecurse = (
                    from KeyValuePair<string, long> kvp in dic
                    where kvp.Value >= cutoff
                    orderby kvp.Value descending
                    select kvp.Key);
                int nextLevel = levels - 1;
                foreach (string folderPath in foldersToRecurse)
                {
                    writeFolderSizes(folderPath, nextLevel);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

For it to be really useful, it often needs to be run as administrator, since trying to access folders like C:\Program files or C:\Users causes it to go into the "catch" parts with my normal user.

1

Here's my answer expanding on that from hao. It includes trapping of exceptions, optional recursion and an optional callback which can be used to display progress or interrupt the procedure.

/// <summary>
/// Callback used after discovering a folder
/// </summary>
/// <param name="dir">current directory</param>
/// <param name="dirByteCount">total bytes directly within directory</param>
/// <param name="totalByteCount">total number of bytes across all directories so far</param>
/// <returns>true to continue, false to abort</returns>
public delegate bool DiskUsageCallback(DirectoryInfo dir, long dirByteCount, long totalByteCount);

/// <summary>
/// Gets the number of bytes used by a given directory.  By default
/// also includes space used by subdirectories
/// </summary>
/// <param name="dir">directory for which to calculate usage</param>
/// <param name="recursive">if true, as default, include the usage for subdirectories.  
/// Only the top directory if false.</param>
/// <param name="callback">if given, inform this callback with each directory, return false to abort</param>
/// <returns>total number of bytes used</returns>
public static long GetDiskUsageBytes(DirectoryInfo dir, bool recursive = true, DiskUsageCallback callback=null)
{
    return GetDiskUsageBytes(dir, recursive, callback, 0);
}

private static long GetDiskUsageBytes(DirectoryInfo dir, bool recursive, DiskUsageCallback callback, long previousByteCount)
{
    long dirSize = 0;
    try
    {
        // Add file sizes.
        FileInfo[] fis = dir.GetFiles();
        foreach (FileInfo fi in fis)
        {
            try
            {
                dirSize += fi.Length;
            } catch (Exception fileEx)
            {
                Debug.WriteLine($"Skipping due to error accessing file: {fi.FullName} {fileEx.GetType().Name}: {fileEx.Message}");
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception dirEx)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine($"Skipping due to error accessing dir: {dir.FullName} {dirEx.GetType().Name}: {dirEx.Message}");
    }
    long subtreeByteCount=dirSize;
    if (recursive)
    {
        // Add subdirectory sizes.
        DirectoryInfo[] dis = dir.GetDirectories();
        foreach (DirectoryInfo di in dis)
            subtreeByteCount += GetDiskUsageBytes(di, recursive, callback, subtreeByteCount+previousByteCount);
    }
    if (callback != null)
    {
        if (!callback(dir, dirSize, previousByteCount+subtreeByteCount))
            throw new Exception("Disk usage calculation aborted.");
    }
    return subtreeByteCount;
}

An example of usage with logging every 30s is:

DateTime notifyAfter = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(30);
long diskUsageBytes=FileUtil.GetDiskUsageBytes(
    new DirectoryInfo(someDir),
    recursive: true,
    callback: delegate(DirectoryInfo dir, long dirByteCount, long totalByteCount
) {
    if (DateTime.Now>notifyAfter)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine($"Found so far: {totalByteCount} bytes");
        notifyAfter = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(30);
    }
    return running;
});
Debug.WriteLine($"Found: {diskUsageBytes} bytes");
0

I try to change the sample (Alexandre Pepin and hao's Answer)

As is

    private long GetDirectorySize(string dirPath)
    {
        if (Directory.Exists(dirPath) == false)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        DirectoryInfo dirInfo = new DirectoryInfo(dirPath);

        long size = 0;

        // Add file sizes.
        FileInfo[] fis = dirInfo.GetFiles();
        foreach (FileInfo fi in fis)
        {
            size += fi.Length;
        }

        // Add subdirectory sizes.
        DirectoryInfo[] dis = dirInfo.GetDirectories();
        foreach (DirectoryInfo di in dis)
        {
            size += GetDirectorySize(di.FullName);
        }

        return size;
    }

To be

    private long GetDirectorySize2(string dirPath)
    {
        if (Directory.Exists(dirPath) == false)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        DirectoryInfo dirInfo = new DirectoryInfo(dirPath);

        long size = 0;

        // Add file sizes.
        IEnumerable<FileInfo> fis = dirInfo.EnumerateFiles("*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories);
        foreach (FileInfo fi in fis)
        {
            size += fi.Length;
        }

        return size;
    }

finally you can check the result

        // ---------------------------------------------
        // size of directory
        using System.IO;

        string log1Path = @"D:\SampleDirPath1";
        string log2Path = @"D:\SampleDirPath2";
        string log1DirName = Path.GetDirectoryName(log1Path);
        string log2DirName = Path.GetDirectoryName(log2Path);
        long log1Size = GetDirectorySize(log1Path);
        long log2Size = GetDirectorySize(log2Path);
        long log1Size2 = GetDirectorySize2(log1Path);
        long log2Size2 = GetDirectorySize2(log2Path);

        Console.WriteLine($@"{log1DirName} Size: {SizeSuffix(log1Size)}, {SizeSuffix(log1Size2)}
        {log2DirName} Size: {SizeSuffix(log2Size)}, {SizeSuffix(log2Size2)}");

and this is the SizeSuffix function

    private static readonly string[] SizeSuffixes =
               { "bytes", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "PB", "EB", "ZB", "YB" };

    /// <summary>
    /// Size Display
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">bytes 數值</param>
    /// <param name="decimalPlaces">小數位數</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static string SizeSuffix(Int64 value, int decimalPlaces = 2)
    {
        if (decimalPlaces < 0) { throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("decimalPlaces"); }
        if (value < 0) { return "-" + SizeSuffix(-value); }
        if (value == 0) { return string.Format("{0:n" + decimalPlaces + "} bytes", 0); }

        // mag is 0 for bytes, 1 for KB, 2, for MB, etc.
        int mag = (int)Math.Log(value, 1024);

        // 1L << (mag * 10) == 2 ^ (10 * mag) 
        // [i.e. the number of bytes in the unit corresponding to mag]
        decimal adjustedSize = (decimal)value / (1L << (mag * 10));

        // make adjustment when the value is large enough that
        // it would round up to 1000 or more
        if (Math.Round(adjustedSize, decimalPlaces) >= 1000)
        {
            mag += 1;
            adjustedSize /= 1024;
        }

        return string.Format("{0:n" + decimalPlaces + "} {1}",
            adjustedSize,
            SizeSuffixes[mag]);
    }
-5

I know this not a .net solution but here it comes anyways. Maybe it comes handy for people that have windows 10 and want a faster solution. For example if you run this command con your command prompt or by pressing winKey + R:

bash -c "du -sh /mnt/c/Users/; sleep 5"    

The sleep 5 is so you have time to see the results and the windows does not closes

In my computer that displays:

enter image description here

Note at the end how it shows 85G (85 Gigabytes). It is supper fast compared to doing it with .Net. If you want to see the size more accurately remove the h which stands for human readable.

So just do something like Processes.Start("bash",... arguments) That is not the exact code but you get the idea.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.