I would like to check which mathematical expressions are equal. I want to do this using Python I tried it with Sympy.

My idea was to use simplify in order to reduce the expressions such that a pair that is equal will be reduced to the same expression. Then I substract them all with each other in my two for loops and check if the result equals to zero.

Unfortunately no substraction results in zero which is very improbable to be correct. I think that probably the simplify function does not really do what I need. Is there a function in sympy to check if two expressions are indeed mathematically equal?

This is my code so far:

from sympy import *

a = symbols ('a')
b = symbols ('b')
n = symbols ('n')
m = symbols ('m')

x1=simplify(log(a,n**(log(b,a))))
x2=simplify(((a**n)/(b**m))**(1/b))
x3=simplify(b**(n*log(a)))
x4=simplify(log(b,n))
x5=simplify(a**((n-m)/b))
x6=simplify(n*(log(a)+log(b)))
x7=simplify(log((a**n)*(b**n)))
x8=simplify(a**(log(b**n)))

L=[x1,x2,x3,x4,x5,x6,x7,x8]



for i in range (0 , 6):

    for k in range (i+1 , 7):

        print(L[i]-L[k])
  • Are any of those expressions actually equal? I don't see any that are. – internet_user Oct 18 '17 at 18:15
  • There should be some that are equal mathematically by performing various transformation e.g. base shifting etc. – Piri Oct 18 '17 at 18:23

Another way to check if functions are equal would be to evaluate them at maybe a few thousand points and check the outputs.

from sympy import *

def generateOutput(L, x):
    # x -> list of points to evaluate functions at (maybe randomly generated?)
    # L -> input list of functions
    # returns list of outputs of L[i] applied to x



a = symbols ('a')
b = symbols ('b')
n = symbols ('n')
m = symbols ('m')

x1=simplify(log(a,n**(log(b,a))))
x2=simplify(((a**n)/(b**m))**(1/b))
x3=simplify(b**(n*log(a)))
x4=simplify(log(b,n))
x5=simplify(a**((n-m)/b))
x6=simplify(n*(log(a)+log(b)))
x7=simplify(log((a**n)*(b**n)))
x8=simplify(a**(log(b**n)))

L=[x1,x2,x3,x4,x5,x6,x7,x8]

outputs = generateOutput(L)
# Compare outputs
  • Thank you for the idea! This would indeed simplify the task. Using a lot of randomly generated arguments for the functions should provide enough accuracy to check them against each other – Piri Oct 18 '17 at 19:49

From the docs:

The Eq function (from sympy.core.relational) looks like it is what you want. Note that if it is given more complex arguments, you will have to simplify to get a result (see last code example in link).

Note: Those for loops don't look right. The first one will only go through indices 0-5 and the second only through i+1 to 6, so the last item in the list will be skipped completely.

  • Thank you, I will try to make it work with Eq! Concerning the note, I am not sure if I get the point. As far as my understanding goes I think the first for loop iterates from 0 to 6 (eg x1 to x7) and the second one from i+1 to 7. The last element in the list should only occur in the second loop. This is an effect of the prevention of double counting. Do I get the indexation wrong in Python/in the foor loop? – Piri Oct 18 '17 at 19:57
  • range is not inclusive on the second argument (ie. range(3) == [0,1,2]) – internet_user Oct 18 '17 at 20:30

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