2

I find that Swift class can't call the original method while it is done type downcasting.

AFAIK, same thing can be done in C/C++ by class pointer.

Let code talks:

protocol MyProtocol {
    func log()
}

class MyClass: MyProtocol {
}

class MyGenericClass<T>{
    init(_ t: T) {}
}

extension MyGenericClass: MyProtocol {
    func log() {
        print("MyGenericClass MyProtocol")
    }
}

extension MyGenericClass where T==Int {
    func log() {
        print("MyGenericClass<Int>")
    }
}

extension MyProtocol {
    func log() {
        print("MyProtocol")
    }
}
extension MyProtocol where Self==TestSwift.MyGenericClass<Int> {
    func log() {
        print("MyProtocol where MyGenericClass<Int>")
    }
}

extension MyProtocol where Self==MyClass {
    func log() {
        print("MyProtocol where MyClass")
    }
}

func logByProtocol(_ p: MyProtocol) {
    p.log()
    print("Type of p is: \(type(of: p))")
}

let myGenericClassNumber = MyGenericClass(1)
let myGenericClassString = MyGenericClass("1")
let myClass = MyClass()


myGenericClassNumber.log()//expect "MyGenericClass<Int>"
myGenericClassString.log()//expect "MyGenericClass MyProtocol"
myClass.log()//expect "MyProtocol where MyClass"

logByProtocol(myGenericClassNumber)//expect "MyGenericClass<Int>", BUT "MyGenericClass MyProtocol"
logByProtocol(myGenericClassString)//expect "MyGenericClass MyProtocol"
logByProtocol(myClass)//expect "MyProtocol where MyClass"

I expect that logByProtocol(myGenericClassNumber) will print "MyGenericClass<Int>", but it prints "MyGenericClass MyProtocol".

It seems that MyGenericClass<Int> can't find the original log() method while it is done type downcasting to MyProtocol.

How to solve this problem to make a "down" class can call its original method?

  • Solved. Simply add if p is MyGenericClass<Int> { (p as! MyGenericClass<Int>).log() }. – Ringo_D Oct 20 '17 at 2:39
  • You have to write as many as if else as many generics you would create, like string generic, double generic, float generic, etc. This is not solution, its hack! – D4ttatraya Oct 20 '17 at 5:57
0

This is happening because Swift dynamic dispatch is ignoring this generic constraint:

MyGenericClass where T==Int

and dispatching call on this extension:

extension MyGenericClass: MyProtocol {}

Dynamic dispatch I'm talking about is where you have written logByProtocol(_) method; which is using dynamic dispatch to call log() method.

And why this

myGenericClassNumber.log()

is working as expected is because it is statically dispatched log() method on MyGenericClass<Int> object.

  • 1
    That explains behaviour, but doesn't answer author's question. – user28434 Oct 19 '17 at 11:25

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