1

I'm learning about singly linked list stacks in class and I came across this stackoverflow page that gave me some reference on how to pop a node:

Pop function on Linked list stack

The first answer uses the following code to pop off a node:

struct Node
{
    int data;
    Node *next;
};

int pop(Node *head)
{
    while(head->next != NULL)
    {
        head = head->next;
    }
    int value;
    Node *tmp;
    tmp = new Node;
    value = head->data;
    tmp = head;
    delete tmp;
    return value;
}

the third answer uses the following code:

int pop( Node * &top )
{
    int value = 0;

    if ( top )
    {
        value = top->num;
        Node *tmp = top;
        top = top->next;
        delete tmp;
    }

    return value;
}

now, because of the first answer I originally wrote my pop function like so:

// Pop the top element off of the stack and return its value.
StackElement Stack::Pop()
{
   assert (!Empty());
   StackElement poppedData = tos->data;
   Node *temp = new Node;
   temp = tos;
   tos = tos->next;
   delete temp;   
   return poppedData;
}

but, my teacher said that creating a new node to delete a previous node will cause a memory leak.

Ultimately I rewrote my code to match style two like so:

StackElement Stack::Pop()
{
   assert (!Empty());
   StackElement poppedData = tos->data;
   Node *temp = tos;
   tos = tos->next;
   delete temp;   
   return poppedData;
}

Can anyone explain to me why the first implementation is wrong? I'm surprised nobody commented on this when the person posted it on the other stackoverflow question. It seems to me like I'm creating a pointer temp of type Node that points to a new Node (aka new memory address), and then I'm setting the value of that memory address to the value in the top of the stack's memory address. I move the top of stack to the next node, and then delete this temp node I created, but because I declared it as a new Node that just has the value of the old top of stack, it doesn't actually have any relation to that node. The old top of stack node is removed from the stack but the memory is not properly freed. Is this correct?

  • Yep, looks like the first answer you found leaks the memory allocated for tmp. I'd recommend commenting on it to point it out to anybody else who may find it. – Steve Oct 19 '17 at 15:38
  • 1
    The first answer is so wrong it's not even funny. I have downvoted it and you should do the same. – n. 'pronouns' m. Oct 19 '17 at 15:44
  • I have just downvoted it. I found it disturbing that it hadn't got any downvoted before. – el.pescado Oct 19 '17 at 15:52
  • BTW. Draw your stack on paper. Linked data structures can be nicely visualized and then it's easy to see what should happen. – el.pescado Oct 19 '17 at 15:53
  • It is wrong not only because of the gratuitious memory leak, but also (more importantly) because the complexity is wrong. You are not supposed to traverse the entire stack to push or pop an element. – n. 'pronouns' m. Oct 19 '17 at 15:58
0

The first answer is wrong.

tmp = new Node;
value = head->data;
tmp = head;
delete tmp;

This deletes the head pointer, which is what you want. But the function creates a new memory allocation at tmp and then immediately overwrites the pointer with the value head. You have now lost the pointer to the allocated data. This is a memory leak.

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