2

I kind of new to vim, and when I usually edit things in vim I go something like:

vim .

or

vim /path/to/some/project

And then Ctrl-P to the file I need to edit. The problem with this approach is that plugins like NERDTree or FZF understand that the working directory is the one I started vim from not the directory I gave it as the parameter. Example:

/some/path$ vim /other/path

vim would understand that /some/path is the working directory not /other/path. Because of this I would have to manually :cd :%p:%h each time I start vim. Is there a way to make vim automatically :cd to the first opened directory?

  • A thought. Set CDPATH to you project path. e.g. export CDPAH=".:~/projects". This will let you switch between projects easily with cd (and :cd inside of Vim) – Peter Rincker Oct 20 '17 at 16:24
3

I never thougth about that, but while reading your question i thougth, that could be nice ... or totaly horrible. Anyway interesting problem and I tried it for like 30 seconds and already hate it. The reason is, that your projectfolder almost never directly contains code files which you want to edit.

It should work like this:

autocmd VimEnter * silent! cd %:p:h
  • Thanks for your answer :). I use Ctrl+P from there to get to where I want. I find it faster than typing shell the entire path to the file. Just as a side note, is there a way for vim to detect whether if the parameter is a file, you do not want the command above triggered but when it's a directory you do? – Revan Darth Oct 20 '17 at 8:13
  • sure you want. because :echo expand("%:p:h") on vim /folder/file gives the same result as on vim /folder the :h flag does not remove a folder from a path. So i would always open a folder with that, since i would go to my project folder and use Ctrl+P or fzf or whatever from there. But if I have to type the path anyway I can use cd which I prefer, because i will stay in the project folder after closing vim (not that I ever close vim). And it does not mess with my directory if i want to open a specific file in my subfolders. – Doktor OSwaldo Oct 20 '17 at 8:21

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