Possible Duplicate:
Remove duplicate rows in MySQL

How would I delete all duplicate data from a MySQL Table?

For example, with the following data:

SELECT * FROM names;

+----+--------+
| id | name   |
+----+--------+
| 1  | google |
| 2  | yahoo  |
| 3  | msn    |
| 4  | google |
| 5  | google |
| 6  | yahoo  |
+----+--------+

I would use SELECT DISTINCT name FROM names; if it were a SELECT query.

How would I do this with DELETE to only remove duplicates and keep just one record of each?

marked as duplicate by Andy Lester, ypercubeᵀᴹ, Frank van Puffelen, Rufinus, Stony Dec 22 '12 at 13:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 37
    Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/3311903/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/2867530/… (Ironically.) – dkarp Jan 13 '11 at 21:03
  • 22
    It's not an exact duplicate question, as this asks specifically for a DELETE command to perform the same action that an ALTER command adding a unique index would be needed to have MySQL automatically remove duplicate rows. In this case, we're choosing how exactly we want to delete the duplicates. – Highway of Life Jan 8 '13 at 22:37
  • So a question about duplicates has duplicates? Hmm – Ham Sam Sep 21 '17 at 3:24
up vote 855 down vote accepted

Editor warning: This solution is computationally inefficient and may bring down your connection for a large table.

NB - You need to do this first on a test copy of your table!

When I did it, I found that unless I also included AND n1.id <> n2.id, it deleted every row in the table.

  1. If you want to keep the row with the lowest id value:

    DELETE n1 FROM names n1, names n2 WHERE n1.id > n2.id AND n1.name = n2.name
    
  2. If you want to keep the row with the highest id value:

    DELETE n1 FROM names n1, names n2 WHERE n1.id < n2.id AND n1.name = n2.name
    

I used this method in MySQL 5.1

Not sure about other versions.


Update: Since people Googling for removing duplicates end up here
Although the OP's question is about DELETE, please be advised that using INSERT and DISTINCT is much faster. For a database with 8 million rows, the below query took 13 minutes, while using DELETE, it took more than 2 hours and yet didn't complete.

INSERT INTO tempTableName(cellId,attributeId,entityRowId,value)
    SELECT DISTINCT cellId,attributeId,entityRowId,value
    FROM tableName;
  • 72
    Excellent solution. It worked perfectly. But I have one suggestion here we should swap the conditions. Instead of [WHERE n1.id > n2.id AND n1.name = n2.name] we should write [WHERE n1.name = n2.name AND n1.id > n2.id] it will improve performance if we have so much data. – user307635 Aug 31 '12 at 13:42
  • 9
    FYI: This ignores rows where column "name" is null. – a coder Sep 12 '12 at 14:49
  • 3
    sqlfiddle.com/#!2/e5df9 for a schema example. May need to load in your instance of MySQL. Then execute: SELECT * FROM deldup; DELETE n1 FROM deldup n1, deldup n2 WHERE n1.or_id < n2.or_id AND n1.order_id = n2.order_id AND n1.txt_value = n2.txt_value AND n1.date_of_revision = n2.date_of_revision AND n1.status = n2.status; SELECT * FROM deldup; – a coder Sep 12 '12 at 14:58
  • 4
    The NB in this answer is VERY IMPORTANT kids. But this is an excellent of MySQL. NOTE that for tables that could have duplicates repeated more than once you will also want a GROUP BY n1.id clause. – usumoio Oct 19 '13 at 0:00
  • 6
    I love this solution, but do you have a suggestion for optimizing it on larger tables? – Argus9 Nov 1 '13 at 17:34

If you want to keep the row with the lowest id value:

DELETE FROM NAMES
 WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT * 
                    FROM (SELECT MIN(n.id)
                            FROM NAMES n
                        GROUP BY n.name) x)

If you want the id value that is the highest:

DELETE FROM NAMES
 WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT * 
                    FROM (SELECT MAX(n.id)
                            FROM NAMES n
                        GROUP BY n.name) x)

The subquery in a subquery is necessary for MySQL, or you'll get a 1093 error.

  • 6
    What does the 'x' do ? – GDmac Feb 15 '14 at 10:29
  • 6
    @GDmac it serves as an alias for inner query. If not specified, an error will be thrown. – rpozarickij Mar 13 '14 at 10:08
  • 4
    @wbinky it serves as an alias for inner query. If not specified, an error will be thrown. – mraaroncruz Sep 15 '14 at 10:33
  • 36
    But what's the x for? (just kidding) – Matt O'Brien May 25 '15 at 5:03
  • 8
    it seems this sql delete unique rows too. actualy all rows – mst Jul 14 '15 at 11:28

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