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If I want to take a List as an argument of a method, Resharper gives a hint that using the IList interface might be a better idea. If I then replace List with IList, Resharper suggests IEnumerable. In Java I would also take the List interface and not ArrayList as an argument. But is it really good looking code to use iEnumerable as an argument? Is this good practice to use IEnumerable if no functionality of IList or List are required?

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    "Is this good practice to use IEnumerable if no functionality of IList or List are required?" -- Yes. Oct 20, 2017 at 14:51
  • Yes because it opens up what you can pass like an array or a lazy loaded Linq query.
    – juharr
    Oct 20, 2017 at 14:53
  • It's always good to provide methods that are reusable. If you ask for the base interface of all generic collections you can use this method with many types, not only with lists. IList<T> covers lists and arrays, but if you don't need methods of IList<T> you can use IEnumerable<T>. Oct 20, 2017 at 14:53
  • if your question is answered, please mark it as such. thank you for the upvote. Oct 20, 2017 at 15:16

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Here is the article that made me change my mind about all that and made me start following the principle of

take the most generic type, return the most specific type

So to answer your question

Is this good practice to use IEnumerable if no functionality of IList or List are required?

yes, it is

note: do not over do it ! I've seen code that accepted an IEnumerable, then threw an exception if the parameter wasn't a List. This is stupid. What the sentence I quoted above means is "don't ask for more specificity than you need"

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