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Here's the problem statement:

  1. I open a GNOME terminal and run a startup script setup_myproject_view1 which sets up an SCM session and sets some enviroment variables.
  2. I open terminal vim and start browsing through some files often in multiple split panes (:sp, :vsp)
  3. I realize that I need to edit and save one or more of these files. But before I can do that I need to check out the file from the SCM server/depot.

Now I have multiple options:

  1. Close all my vim panes and run the checkout command in the shell and then open one or all of the files I had open before. Very tedious.
  2. Open a new terminal window or tab and run the startup script and checkout the file. Then return to the original terminal, run :e to load the file again with write permission enabled and proceed to edit it. Still tedious because I have to run the startup script (so I have to remember which project view I'm working in) and switch through windows/tabs.
  3. Run the shell check out command from vim using :shell or :!. This would be ideal because I'm quickly able to return to editing without breaking my train of thought. But the shell inside vim again does not have the startup session setup_myproject1_view1. Nor do I want to put setup_myproject_view1 to run automatically in my shell's .cshrc file because I have different projects and views: setup_myproject3_view2, etc.

So how can I run a shell command conveniently from vim without having to setup the SCM project view?

1 Answer 1

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you can pause vim using ctrl+z, do your checkout and then resume it with fg if you invoked vim from a bash shell. For more information see bash job control

An alternative, you should modify your setup script to export variables to underlying shells. For example if your script is like this:

 # script.sh
 MEH=4

you will get this result when you use it:

source script.sh
vim
:shell
echo $MEH

exit

but if you change it like this:

 # script.sh
 export MEH=4

you will get this result when you use it:

source script.sh
vim
:shell
echo $MEH
4
exit
1
  • note: you need to be in vim command mode for <kbd>ctrl</kbd>+<kbd>z</kbd> to work properly - in insert mode it is just sent to the current buffer as ASCII 26 character
    – pqnet
    Commented Oct 20, 2017 at 16:42

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