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https://cs.stackexchange.com/questions/82775/to-prove-or-disprove-that-language-is-regular/82780#82780

I posted the question in the link above, and I didn't quite get the answer I want. The answer provided in the link would be correct if a number can start with 0. But I want to point out that that's not allowed. The language that is described here is the set of integers such that the sum of digits is a multiple of two. Or equivalently, a set of numbers which has an even number of odd number digits (e.g 2354 has two odd numbers 3,5). How can I derive regular expression for such a language? Any further insight would be appreciated.

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Assume you've already found an even-sum integer. Then you can arbitrarily extend it by either

  • adding an even digit, or
  • adding an odd digit, followed by 0 or more even digits, followed by an odd digit

The result will be another even-sum integer.

Now we just need a way to get started. An even-sum integer starts with either

  • an even digit that is not 0, or
  • an odd digit, followed by 0 or more even digits, followed by an odd digit

We can write this down as a regex:

([2468]|[13579][02468]*[13579])([02468]|[13579][02468]*[13579])*
| improve this answer | |
  • Brilliant! Thank you for great explanation! – Ted Oct 21 '17 at 9:32

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