32

I am using es-lint to clean up the errors in my code. I have come across this error:

Unnecessary 'else' after 'return'. (No-else-return)

} else {

I have always used else statements after a return. Is there something I may be overlooking?

   if (cctot <= 3 && cctot > 0) {
      alert('Credit under $3.00 not allowed');
      return Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER; // important to return 0 so we can check for these conditions for validation
    } else {
      cctot *= -1;
    }
  }
  return precise(cctot);
}
module.exports = calculateCredit;
7
  • Please post complete snippet, only then we will he able to help – Talha Abrar Oct 22 '17 at 14:51
  • 13
    If the return is executed, the function exits. Using an else there is redundant and misleading. – Pointy Oct 22 '17 at 14:52
  • 5
    @Pointy Using an else there is redundant and misleading. Huh? Guiding developers through your conditional logic by providing all branches is misleading? The less code, the better? I don't think so! – user6445533 Oct 22 '17 at 15:22
  • 6
    Let's not forget that ESLint is only there to help us enforce our opinionated conventions. It's not up to ESLint to help the coder determine the difference between right and wrong or "best practices" in the JavaScript community, its merely a tool to help teams and individuals establish their own conventions. In this case, whoever setup the ESLint configurations decided that` else-returns` are redundant, but that doesn't mean they are wrong if someone prefers to use them. – radiovisual Oct 25 '17 at 13:53
42

What that is basically saying is that the else part of the if statement is unnecessary if there is a return in the if part. Something like this is what it expects:

if (cctot <= 3 && cctot > 0) {
      alert('Credit under $3.00 not allowed');
      return Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER; // important to return 0 so we can check for these conditions for validation
}
cctot *= -1;

In general, this:

if (condition) {
  return something;
} else {
  // do another thing
}

return anotherThing;

is similar to:

if (condition) {
  return something;
}

// do another thing
return anotherThing;

After the if with a return statement, there is no need for the else part as the code below the if will only run when the condition stated is not fulfilled.

9
  • 1
    This is totally the way to go. – Robert Moskal Oct 22 '17 at 14:57
  • That version has the else. What does the version with the "parsing error" look like? – Pointy Oct 22 '17 at 15:05
  • 1
    @DavidBrierton: You may want to submit that code to codereview.stackexchange.com since there's a good bit of redundancy that can be eliminated. – llama Oct 22 '17 at 15:06
  • @DavidBrierton It doesn't even make sense to use an else there. Apparently you want to flip the sign of the credit value right before you return it at the end of the function. This has nothing to do with the if that that else is attached to. – JLRishe Oct 22 '17 at 15:12
  • @DavidBrierton If you remove an else { you need to remove the closing brace at the end of the block. Is that not obvious? – JLRishe Oct 22 '17 at 15:13
23

It's a code style preference. You don't need the else and instead can put the else code directly below the if. This is because if the if succeeds, that's the end of the function, so the else code will never be reached anyway.

So this:

if (condition) {
  return foo;
} else {
  // do bar
}

return baz

is equivalent to this:

if (condition) {
  return foo;
}

// do bar

return baz

This style seems to vary in different programming communities. Go developers will nearly always omit the else, while I've seen more JS devs include it.

While I prefer to leave off the else, it is again purely a matter of preference. Don't let it worry you too much. People may get dogmatic about this kind of thing, but it's really not that important.

1
  • 1
    I think @llama's advice is spot on, especially when then the if block is more than a few lines. Then the else condition can really help with clarity. – craft Jan 24 '19 at 1:07
1

The return statement stops/terminates the current function. It's just saying that there's no need for 'else' since the execution of the function already stopped and if the 'if' condition doesn't succeed, it will still run any code underneath it.

As for best practice, I won't say it's a big of a deal always but with the code in your example, I won't use the else clause because it's simply not needed. I think it's good to understand what's happening under the hood and the reason behind best practices and not just following them.

1
  • 2
    Good code transparently reflects developer's intention and is meant to read by engineers first, not by machines. It's obviously bad to skip else just "because it's not needed" (by engine). If you don't skip "else" when you talk about what your code does it's already a good reason not to remove "else" from the code. – meandre Jul 1 '20 at 14:06
0

While the rule correctly points out that the else block is unnecessary, and it is a style preference, I would add additional considerations for readability and most importantly scanability.

For the developer writing this code, and to the machine interpreting it, it may be a style point and that's it. But for the developer who needs to fix a bug, enhance a feature, do a code review, etc. the ability to quickly scan through the code and see the else blocks helps to identify branches of logic.

In a few lines of isolated code it is easy to see the intent, but among hundreds of lines of code having if else blocks can serve as useful identifiers, much like other common visual practices like indentation, line breaks, and naming conventions.

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