2

This command will print a.

echo "line1 a b c" | awk '{ print $2 }'

If I change single quotes to double quotes, like this, it will print whole line.

echo "line1 a b c" | awk "{ print $2 }"

Why? I know I should use single quotes, but why is the whole line printed if I use double quotes?

marked as duplicate by Benjamin W., Charles Duffy linux Oct 23 '17 at 15:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    With double quotes, the shell expands $2 to the second positional parameter, which might very well be empty, and awk only sees print. – Benjamin W. Oct 23 '17 at 4:20
  • @BenjaminW. Agree with your answer, but don't think it is duplicate. – michael Oct 23 '17 at 4:34
  • 1
    I can't see how it isn't duplicative. An answer to how single quotes and double quotes are different in bash answers how they're different when using bash to call awk, because the sole difference is the shell's behavior; awk has no way of telling the difference between awk '{ print }' and awk "{ print $2 }" with bash having an empty $2. – Charles Duffy Oct 23 '17 at 15:45
6

If the awk command is single quoted, the $2 is not interpreted by the shell, but is instead passed as the literal string $2 to awk. awk will then print the second space delimited token in the input string, which in this case is a.

echo "line1 a b c" | awk '{ print $2 }' # prints the second space-delimited token
> a

If the awk command is double quoted, the $2 is interpreted by the shell. Because $2 is empty (in this case), the empty string is substituted. awk sees a command which looks like awk "{ print }", which is an instruction to print everything.

echo "line1 a b c" | awk '{ print }' # prints all input
> line1 a b c

It is also possible to use double qotes, and escape the $, which will cause the $ to not be interpreted by the shell, and instead the $2 string will be passed to awk.

echo "line1 a b c" | awk "{ print \$2 }" # prints the second space-delimited token
> a

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.