This is confusing, as I'm getting seemingly contradictive errors.

I'm using generics, constraining T to Something, then constraining U to AnOperation<Something>.

I expected that an object AnOperation<Something> is from now on considered of type U. But, I'm getting errors:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'ConsoleApp1.AnOperation<T>' to 'U'

That's weird. Well, i tried explicitly casting it to U, then I got this error:

Cannot convert type 'ConsoleApp1.AnOperation<T>' to 'U' which also stated Cast is redundant

namespace ConsoleApp1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
        }
    }

    class MyClass<T, U>
        where T : Something
        where U : AnOperation<Something>
    {
        public U GetAnOperationOfSomething()
        {
            AnOperation<T> anOperation = new AnOperation<T>();

            return anOperation; // Cannot implicitly convert type 'ConsoleApp1.AnOperation<T>' to 'U'

            // return (U)anOperation; // Cannot convert type 'ConsoleApp1.AnOperation<T>' to 'U' also Cast is redundant
        }
    }

    public class Something
    {
    }

    public class AnOperation<T>
        where T : Something
    {
    }

}

What's happening here?

Edit: I'm trying to understand what is the problem in the language level, not looking for a workaround on an actual problem.

  • 2
    What is the point of having an U when in the end you use the actual type instead of your template parameter? Your code should be var anOperation = new U(); with the new constraint for U. – nvoigt Oct 23 '17 at 7:35
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You almost got it right with your constraint, but not quite. You define

 where U : AnOperation<Something>

But then you create

AnOperation<T> anOperation = new AnOperation<T>()

That is not the same thing. If you change your constraint to...

 where U : AnOperation<T>

...you will be fine.

Another problem is that while every U is an AnOperation<T>, not every AnOperation<T> is an U. When you declare...

public U GetAnOperationOfSomething()

...you are making the guarantee that what the method returns is an U. AnOperation<T> can not satisfy that guarantee.

You are solving this with a typecast to U. That is against the purpose of your generic class, since every U must be an AnOperation<T> or you will get a runtime exception. That makes the whole type parameter U unnecessary. What you actually want to do is create an U. You can use the new() constraint for that:

class MyClass<T, U>
    where T : Something
    where U : AnOperation<T>, new()
{
    public U GetAnOperationOfSomething()
    {
        U anOperation = new U();
        //...
        return anOperation;
    }
}

The new() constraint guarantees that U will have a public default constructor, which you can invoke.

  • What about interface case (see my answer), why it is valid for compiler? – astef Oct 23 '17 at 8:02
  • @astef It has absolutely nothing to do with class or interface. The key thing you do differently is that you create the instance in another method, so the compiler dosen't know that the object is not an U. It will still fail in runtime, if you create an instance of AnOperation<T>. Keep the instantiation in a separate method and constrain it to a class instead of an interface. It will work. – Sefe Oct 23 '17 at 8:06
  • no it will not (just checked it) – astef Oct 23 '17 at 8:09
  • 1
    I'm not asking about fixing the code. I'm asking why replacing interface to class in my answer's sample makes code not compiling. Your first version with method is wrong. Your second version - "relaxed compiler evaluation" is too broad. Nevermind, you just don't know, as am I – astef Oct 23 '17 at 8:33
  • 1
    Because (as I said) an interface is not a class and is evaluated differently by the compiler (since an object can only derive from one class, but implement multiple interfaces). It will fail at runtime just the same, since then only what the object is counts, not what it could be. – Sefe Oct 23 '17 at 8:39

T in your class is any class inheriting from Something. U is any class inheriting from AnOperation<Something>. Suppose you have child class like this:

public class ChildOperation<T> : AnOperation<T> {}

Now your U might be ChildOperation<Something>, and you cannot return instance of parent class (AnOperation<T>) as instance of child class (U which is ChildOperation<Something>). It might also go wrong when T is really ChildSomething, because AnOperation<Something> cannot be implicitly converted to AnOperation<ChildSomething>. Long story short - AnOperation<T> indeed cannot be always converted to your U type, so compiler is correct.

Just to support @Evk's answer. See this example.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MyClass<SomeSomething, AnOperation<Something>> foo = 
        new MyClass<SomeSomething, AnOperation<Something>>(); 
        // AnOperation<SomeSomething> will cause a compile error.

        var bar = foo.GetAnOperationOfSomething();

        Console.WriteLine(bar != null);

        Console.Read();
    }
}

class MyClass<T, U>
    where T : Something
    where U : AnOperation<Something>
{
    public U GetAnOperationOfSomething()
    {
        U anOperation = Activator.CreateInstance<U>();

        return anOperation;
    }
}

public class Something
{
}

public class AnOperation<T>
    where T : Something
{
}

public class SomeSomething : Something
{
}

It's not clear what you are trying to do, you may want to expand the question. For instance, will there be several types of operation? Depending on that there are several possible solutions

If there are no operation subtypes, the U parameter is unnecessary. Just return AnOperation<T> as that can already describe all operations.

    // With only one type of operation
    namespace ConsoleApp2
    {    

        class MyClass<T> where T : Something        
        {
            public AnOperation<T> GetAnOperationOfSomething()
            {
                AnOperation<T> anOperation = new AnOperation<T>();
                return anOperation; 
            }
        }

        public class Something
        {
        }

        public sealed class AnOperation<T>
            where T : Something
        {
        }
    }

If there are many kinds of operations (which seems likely), then the problem is that your class can't know about how to make them when it doesn't know about them. You need to give your class a function that can produce an U instance to return.

    // With a factory for operations
    namespace ConsoleApp1
    {    
        class MyClass<T, U>
            where T : Something
            where U : AnOperation<Something>
        {
            private readonly Func<T, U> operationMaker;

            public MyClass(Func<T, U> operationMaker)
            {
                this.operationMaker = operationMaker;           
            }

            public U GetAnOperationOfSomething(T something)
            {           
                U anOperation = operationMaker(something);
                return anOperation; 
            }
        }

        public class Something
        {
        }

        public class AnOperation<T>
            where T : Something
        {
        }

    }

Alternatively you can constrain U to new new() so that your class can create them without further knowledge.

    // With a "new()" contraint on U
    namespace ConsoleApp3
    {    
        class MyClass<T, U>
            where T : Something
            where U : AnOperation<Something>, new()
        {
            public U GetAnOperationOfSomething()
            {           
                U anOperation = new U();
                return anOperation; 
            }
        }

        public class Something
        {
        }

        public class AnOperation<T>
            where T : Something
        {
        }

    }

It surprisingly compiles if you switch from AnOperation class to IAnOperation interface:

class MyClass<T, U>
    where T : Something
    where U : IAnOperation<Something>
{
    public U GetAnOperationOfSomething()
    {
        IAnOperation<T> anOperation = GenAnOperation();
        return (U)anOperation;
    }

    private IAnOperation<T> GenAnOperation()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

public class Something
{ }

public interface IAnOperation<T>
    where T : Something
{ }
  • 1
    While it compiles - it's not type safe, becase your (U)anOperation cast can fail at runtime. Also you did not use any type parameters variance here (though it won't help anyway). – Evk Oct 23 '17 at 7:51
  • 1
    @Evk Agree. Can you explain, why it compiles for interface but not class? Feel free to edit my answer, it would be helpful not only for OP – astef Oct 23 '17 at 8:01
  • 1
    Hard to provide exact explanation, but in general compiler cannot be so sure about whether cast is possible when interface is involved, because actual type behind that interface can be anything, and that type can be castable to target type. With concrete types like in OP example compiler has much more information and so in many cases might figure out types are unrelated to each other and refuse the cast at compile time. – Evk Oct 23 '17 at 8:34

Well the following works for me (EDIT: I am in framework v4.5.2):

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyClass<Something, AnOperation<Something>> obj = new MyClass<Something, AnOperation<Something>>();
        }
    }

    class MyClass<T, U>
        where T : Something
        where U : AnOperation<Something>
    {
        public U GetAnOperationOfSomething()
        {
            AnOperation<T> anOperation = new AnOperation<T>();

            return anOperation as U;

        }
    }

    public class Something
    {
    }

    public class AnOperation<T>
        where T : Something
    {
    }
  • 2
    did you run it? the as operator will return null if the cast is unsuccessful – Mong Zhu Oct 23 '17 at 7:40
  • Yes it might - but then there is slim possibility for it as the constraint on U forces the type compatibility. so you really cant replace anything which is not a subtype of Something/ – Prateek Shrivastava Oct 23 '17 at 7:45
  • If there are no subtypes of AnOperation<T> then the U parameter was unnecessary to begin with, and if there are subtypes of AnOperation (So the caller does new Myclass<Something, SubOperation<Something>> then the class will always return null. – Anders Forsgren Oct 23 '17 at 7:54

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