72

I have a data set asking a customer how many pets they have for example. Is there a way with one query I can count the distinct values (1,2,3, etc)? Thanks!

+----------+------+
| Customer | Pets |
+----------+------+
|       20 |    2 |
|       21 |    3 |
|       22 |    3 |
|       23 |    2 |
|       24 |    4 |
+----------+------+

What I want is a list saying:

  • 2 had 2 Pets
  • 2 had 3 Pets
  • 1 had 4 Pets
107

You can do a distinct count as follows:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT column_name) FROM table_name;

EDIT:

Following your clarification and update to the question, I see now that it's quite a different question than we'd originally thought. "DISTINCT" has special meaning in SQL. If I understand correctly, you want something like this:

  • 2 customers had 1 pets
  • 3 customers had 2 pets
  • 1 customers had 3 pets

Now you're probably going to want to use a subquery:

select COUNT(*) column_name FROM (SELECT DISTINCT column_name);

Let me know if this isn't quite what you're looking for.

  • I had tried that previous with zero luck. Here is an example of my data; Customer | Pets 20 | 2 21 | 3 22 | 3 23 | 2 24 | 4 What I want is a list saying: 2 had 2 Pets 2 had 3 Pets 1 had 4 Pets – willlangford Jan 14 '11 at 22:32
  • 1
    making a subquery? I think its too much overhead for such a simple task... – maid450 Jan 18 '11 at 19:31
  • I actually was looking for the original version, and the first part of this solution worked for me. Thanks for not deleting it! – D. Strout Apr 23 '13 at 22:31
  • 5
    The edited query doesn't work for me as it doesn't contain the table name? Or am I missing something? – Evan Hobbs Jul 2 '15 at 14:08
41

Ok, I deleted my previous answer because finally it was not what willlangford was looking for, but I made my point that maybe we were all misunderstanding the question.

I also thought of the SELECT DISTINCT... thing at first, but it seemed too weird to me that someone needed to know how many people had a different number of pets than the rest... thats why I thought that maybe the question was not clear enough.

So, now that the real question meaning is clarified, making a subquery for this its quite an overhead, I would preferably use a GROUP BY clause.

Imagine you have the table customer_pets like this:

+-----------------------+
|  customer  |   pets   |
+------------+----------+
| customer1  |    2     |
| customer2  |    3     |
| customer3  |    2     |
| customer4  |    2     |
| customer5  |    3     |
| customer6  |    4     |
+------------+----------+

then

SELECT count(customer) AS num_customers, pets FROM customer_pets GROUP BY pets

would return:

+----------------------------+
|  num_customers  |   pets   |
+-----------------+----------+
|        3        |    2     |
|        2        |    3     |
|        1        |    4     |
+-----------------+----------+

as you need.

  • The column name in count(customer) is superfluous. You can just use: SELECT COUNT(*) AS num_customers, pets FROM customer_pets GROUP BY pets – sgussman Jul 28 '15 at 17:19
  • 6
    @sgussman Not excactly, if you allow NULL values for customer then COUNT(customer) will not count them, while COUNT(*) or COUNT(pets) will. In that case it depends on what behaviour you prefer. In any case even if it does not make a difference most of the time I like to specify the column I want to count for readability. – maid450 Jul 29 '15 at 6:49
1

I think this link is pretty good.

Sample output from that link:

mysql> SELECT cate_id,COUNT(DISTINCT(pub_lang)), ROUND(AVG(no_page),2)
    -> FROM book_mast
    -> GROUP BY cate_id;
+---------+---------------------------+-----------------------+
| cate_id | COUNT(DISTINCT(pub_lang)) | ROUND(AVG(no_page),2) |
+---------+---------------------------+-----------------------+
| CA001   |                         2 |                264.33 | 
| CA002   |                         1 |                433.33 | 
| CA003   |                         2 |                256.67 | 
| CA004   |                         3 |                246.67 | 
| CA005   |                         3 |                245.75 | 
+---------+---------------------------+-----------------------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)
-1

You can use this:

select count(customer) as count, pets
from table
group by pets

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