I have 2 variables, say x and y, and I need to check which of them is None

if x is None and y is None:
    # code here
else:
    if x is not None and y is not None:
        # code here
    else:
        if x is None:
            # code here
        if y is None:
            # code here

Is there a better approach to do this?
I am looking for a shorter IF ELSE structure.

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Keeping the order you used:

if x is None and y is None:
    # code here for x = None = y
elif x is not None and y is not None:
    # code here for x != None != y
elif x is None:
    # code here for x = None != y
else:
    # code here for x != None = y

Modifying the order to reduce boolean evaluations:

if x is None and y is None:
    # code here for x = None = y
elif x is None:
    # code here for x = None != y
elif y is None:
    # code here for x != None = y
else:
    # code here for x != None != y

In a 4 case scenario, you should consider which of the options has a higher probability and which has the second higher and keep them the first two options, as this will reduce the amount of conditions checked during execution. The last two options will both execute the 3 conditions so the order of these two doesn't matter. For example the first code above considers that prob(x=None & y=None) > prob(x!=None & y!=None) > prob(x=None & y!=None) ~ prob(x!=None & y=None) while the second one considers that prob(x=None & y=None) > prob(x=None & y!=None) > prob(x!=None & y=None) ~ prob(x!=None & y!=None)

  def func1(a):
    print a
  def func2(a):
    print a
  def func3(a):
    print a
  def func4(a):
    print a

  options = {(1, 1): func1,
                (1, 0): func2,
                (0, 1): func3,
                (0, 0): func4,}

  options[(True, True)](100)

output:

100
  • That requires signatures to be equal for all functions inside – Adirio Oct 23 '17 at 14:23
  • @Adirio no it is not. it can be changed to *args – galaxyan Oct 23 '17 at 14:24
  • The problem is not while defining the function, the problem is when you call it. You passed 100 before knowing which function would be called, so all of them require to handle 1 argument (even if they are not doing anything with it. Basically you would need to take the argument sets of each function and take the union of all of them to get the calling signature. Same for the output. – Adirio Oct 23 '17 at 14:30
  • @Adirio it is just an example. you can pass any args to function as you want by changing function definition. Python does not limit you on that side – galaxyan Oct 23 '17 at 14:34
  • @galaxyan But what if func1 requires parameters "foo", 1 and func2 requires parameter False? How would you write the options[(x, y)](...) line? You could use lambda or partial but that won't make the code any simpler. – tobias_k Oct 23 '17 at 15:12

If you need 4 different paths for each of the possible combination of x and y, you can't really simplify it that much. That said, I would group the checks for one of the variables (i.e. check if x is None first, then inside, check if y is None.)

Something like this:

if x is None:
    if y is None:
        # x is None, y is None
    else:
        # x is None, y is not None
else:
    if y is None:
        # x is not None, y is None
    else:
        # x is not None, y is not None

you can start by using the elif statement, it will be a little bit shorter just like this:

if x is None and y is None:
    # code here
elif x is not None and y is not None:
    # code here
elif x is None:
    # code here
if y is None:
    # code here`

If you have two booleans, there are four distinct possibilities: 00 01 10 and 11. If in each case something distinctly different is supposed to happen, there is not really something that could reduce the number of tests. The only thing would be to introduce three if-statements (like 1&1, 0&1, 1&0) and one default (which would catch 00), saving you one comparison. Which is probably irrelevant in the overwhelming majority of cases and might even be something a compiler or interpreter does anyways. At least I was baffled by some displays of gcc-magic I saw lately.

Assuming you need to have all 4 cases covered seperately:

if not x and not y:
    # code here (both are none or 0)
elif not x
    # code here (x is none or 0)
elif not y
    # code here (y is none or 0)
else
    #code here (both x and y have values)

This would be the shortest way to handle it, but doesn't only check for None/Null values. not x returns true for anything falsey, such as empty strings, False, or 0.

  • 1
    Note that not (False) is True. – tyteen4a03 Oct 23 '17 at 13:36
  • This is true, see stackoverflow.com/questions/20420934/… for details on how if x: stuff gets handled in Python. – ividito Oct 23 '17 at 13:38
  • 1
    No, what I am saying is that the original code only asks for None checking, whereas your code will let anything falsey pass. – tyteen4a03 Oct 23 '17 at 13:40

The below logic should run for all the combination. Write in your language

 if (x is not null and y is not null){
        //code here
    }
 else if(x is null and y is not null){
        //code here
    }
 else if(x is not null and y is null){
        //code here
    }
 else
    {
    //Code here
    }

The C Code for the same:

int main()
{
    int x,y;
    printf("Enetr Two Number");
    scanf("%d%d",&x,&y);

        if(x!=NULL && y!=NULL)

            printf("X and Y are not null");
            else if(x==NULL && y!=NULL)
            printf("X is null and Y is not null");
            else if(x!=NULL && y==NULL)
            printf("X is not null and Y is null");

    else
    {
        printf("The value of x and y are null");
    }
}
  • @Adirio Thank you so much for the correction. you are right about it. I have updated my answer. – Neeraj Kumar Oct 24 '17 at 8:37
  • Downvoted: he asked for Python, not pseudocode nor C. – Adirio Oct 24 '17 at 8:43
  • @Adirio I want to help understand logic not providing exact code. – Neeraj Kumar Oct 24 '17 at 8:47

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