30

Based on http://www.mredkj.com/javascript/nfbasic2.html, following code will result in 5.6e+2.

num = 555.55;
result = num.toPrecision(2); // result will equal 5.6e+2

How can I let the output of the result variable be displayed without scientific notation (i.e., e)?

20

To get a float with reduced precision, you could use toPrecision() like you do, and then parse the scientific notation with parseFloat(), like so:

result = parseFloat(num.toPrecision(2));

If you do not wish to reduce precision, you could use toFixed() to get the number with a certain number of decimals.

4
  • 3
    That yields 2 decimals. Precision doesn't start counting from the decimal point, but from the first digit. toPrecision(2) for "555.55" would mean something like toFixed(-1) (which doesn't exist as it doesn't really make sense). – David Hedlund Jan 14 '11 at 8:31
  • This is awesome. This nicely formats big numbers (24823492.293849 --> 25000000) as well as numbers with decimal dust (e.g. 1/5 + 1/20 - 1/200 + 1/400 + 1/10 = 0.34750000000000003 --> 0.35`) – prototype Jun 10 '13 at 16:29
  • 1
    A nice feature of toPrecision() is that it retains trailing zeros, indicating the precision of the result (eg (0.5).toPrecision(2) gives "0.50"). If you want to keep this behaviour, you could use result = num.toPrecision(2).includes('e') ? parseFloat(num.toPrecision(2)) : num.toPrecision(2). – ChrisV Nov 19 '16 at 10:50
  • If you want to also remove very small numbers like 3.1e-31 : parseFloat((Math.round(value * 100000) /100000).toPrecision(2)) – stallingOne Nov 21 '17 at 13:57
16
Number((555.55).toPrecision(2))

http://jsfiddle.net/K5GRb/

2
  • 1
    +1, and deleted my own answer. This is completely the way to go. – David Hedlund Jan 14 '11 at 8:36
  • This is preferable over parseFloat((555.55).toPrecision(2)) – asmmahmud Jul 20 '17 at 17:36
0

Try

result = Math.ceil(555.55);
1
  • 5
    This yields 556, not 560 which 5.6e+2 represents. – David Hedlund Jan 14 '11 at 8:32
0

I had a similar desire to preserve a certain amount of precision, not have trailing zeros, and not have scientific notation. I think the following function works:

function toDecimalPrecision(val, digits) {
  val = (+val).toPrecision(digits);
  if (val.indexOf('e') >= 0) {
    val = (+val).toString();
  } else if (val.indexOf('.') >= 0) {
    val = val.replace(/(\.|)0+$/, '');
  }
  return val;
-3

eval is evil.

Do

var result = num.toPrecision(2).toString(10);

instead.

1
  • 1
    toPrecision returns a string, so calling toString on that wouldn't make a difference. – Sebastian Paaske Tørholm Jan 14 '11 at 8:46

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