4

I am trying to implement the concept of invoking base class constructor and inheritance.I have written the following code but it is giving error when I don't declare the default constructor for class A, I wonder why am I getting the error.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
    int a;
    public:
    A() {} //Default Constructor
    A(int x)
    {
        a=x;cout<<a;
        cout<<"A Constructor\n";
    }
};
class B: virtual public A
{
    int b;
    public:
    B(int x)
    {
        b=x;cout<<b;
        cout<<"B Constructor\n";
    }
};
class C: virtual public A
{
    int c;
    public:
    C(int x)
    {
        c=x;cout<<c;
        cout<<"C Constructor\n";
    }
};
class D: public B,public C
{
    int d;
    public:
    D(int p,int q,int r,int s):A(p),B(q),C(r)
    {
        d=s;cout<<d;
        cout<<"D Constructor\n";
    }
};
int main()
{
    D d(1,2,3,4);
    return 0;
}
  • 2
    Which error specifically? – user0042 Oct 23 '17 at 17:15
  • 1
    The A default constructor is used implicitly in classes B and C. I'm not sure of the formal because I remember this question popping up years ago, and possibly the answer was that in a case like this the implicit initializations in B and C should be regarded as non-existent. Anyway these initializations are effectively ignored in your use case, because a virtual base class is initialized from the most derived class, in your case D. Yes, the concept of virtual inheritance in C++ is a bit unclean. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 23 '17 at 17:16
1

For the moment, let's simplify things and forget about existence of classes C an D.

If you construct an object of type B as

B b(10);

it will use B::B(int). In the implementation of B::B(int), the A part of B has to be initialized somehow. You have:

B(int x)
{
    b=x;cout<<b;
    cout<<"B Constructor\n";
}

which is equivalent to:

B(int x) : A()
{
    b=x;cout<<b;
    cout<<"B Constructor\n";
}

Since A does not have a default constructor, the compiler correctly reports that as an error.

You could fix that by using:

B(int x) : A(0)
{
    b=x;cout<<b;
    cout<<"B Constructor\n";
}

If would like to be able to pass another value to A(int) from B's constructor, you need to allow the user to construct a B using two arguments.

B(int x, int y = 0) : A(y)
{
    b=x;cout<<b;
    cout<<"B Constructor\n";
}
  • However, class B is not used as a most derived class in the OP's code. One could argue that support for separate compilation practically requires that that case does not have special rules. But I'm not so sure. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 23 '17 at 17:36
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf, B(int) needs to be handled correctly regardless of whether B is instantiated or D is instantiated. – R Sahu Oct 23 '17 at 17:57
  • @R.Sahu: Note that it does different things in the case of B as most derived class, and the case of B as a base class. In the latter case it does not necessarily call the A constructor. That's called from the most derived class. One way to effect the different behaviors is to generate code for the B constructor that performs a dynamic check of whether to call A(). Another way is to emit the call to A() at the place of instantion of B as most derived class. In the latter case the linker error can be avoided. The question about what the standard allows/guarantees is therefore open. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 23 '17 at 18:12
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf, True. It's not clear to me whether the OP understands that. However, when B(int) is processed by the compiler, it has no way of knowing whether a B will be instantiated or not. It has to process B(int) with the possibility that B will be instantiated. – R Sahu Oct 23 '17 at 18:17
  • The possibility that B may be instantiated does not mean that B's constructor must have code that calls A(). It's trivial to avoid that, if the standard requires avoiding it. So this is not a question of technical necessity: it's a question of what the standard says, or not. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 23 '17 at 18:18
2

If you dont call the constructor of the superclass in the subclass, the superclass must have a default constructor, because if you want to create an instance of B, there will be automatically created an instance of the superclass, which is not possible if there is no default constructor.

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