I want grammar to do something like this:

> "abc" ~~ m:ex/^ (\w ** 1..2) (\w ** 1..2) $ {say $0, $1}/
「ab」「c」
「a」「bc」

Or like this:

> my regex left { \S ** 1..2  }
> my regex right { \S ** 1..2  }
> "abc" ~~ m:ex/^ <left><right> $ {say $<left>, $<right>}/
「ab」「c」
「a」「bc」

Here is my grammar:

grammar LR {
  regex TOP {
    <left> 
    <right>
  }
  regex left {
    \w ** 1..2 
  }
  regex right {
    \w ** 1..2 
  }
}

my $string = "abc";
my $match = LR.parse($string);
say "input: $string";
printf "split: %s|%s\n", ~$match<left>, ~$match<right>;

Its output is:

$ input: abc
$ split: ab|c

So, <left> can be only greedy leaving nothing to <right>. How should I modify the code to match both possible variants?

$ input: abc
$ split: a|bc, ab|c
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Grammars are designed to give zero or one answers, not more than that, so you have to use some tricks to make them do what you want.

Since Grammar.parse returns just one Match object, you have to use a different approach to get all matches:

sub callback($match) {
    say $match;
}
grammar LR {
    regex TOP {
        <left> 
        <right>
        $
        { callback($/) }
        # make the match fail, thus forcing backtracking:
        <!>
    }
    regex left {
        \w ** 1..2 
    }
    regex right {
        \w ** 1..2 
    }
}

LR.parse('abc');

Making the match fail by calling the <!> assertion (which always fails) forces the previous atoms to backtrack, and thus finding different solutions. Of course this makes the grammar less reusable, because it works outside the regular calling conventions for grammars.

Note that, for the caller, the LR.parse seems to always fail; you get all the matches as calls to the callback function.

A slightly nicer API (but the same approach underneath) is to use gather/take to get a sequence of all matches:

grammar LR {
    regex TOP {
        <left> 
        <right>
        $
        { take $/ }
        # make the match fail, thus forcing backtracking:
        <!>
    }
    regex left {
        \w ** 1..2 
    }
    regex right {
        \w ** 1..2 
    }
}

.say for gather LR.parse('abc');
  • 1
    I never thought about using gather and take with code inside regexes, what a wonderful method! And thanks for the whole answer, it's very useful for me in many ways! – Eugene Barsky Oct 25 '17 at 12:20

I think Moritz Lenz, nickname moritz, author of the upcoming book "Parsing with Perl 6 Regexes and Grammars", is the person to ask about this. I probably should have just asked him to answer this SO...

Notes

In case anyone considers attempting to modify grammar.parse so that it supports :exhaustive, or otherwise hacking things to do what @evb wants, the following documents potentially useful inspiration/guidance that I gleaned from spelunking the relevant speculations document (S05) and searching the #perl6 and #perl6-dev irc logs.

7 years ago Moritz added an edit of S05:

A [regex] modifier that affects only the calling behaviour, and not the regex itself [eg :exhaustive] may only appear on constructs that involve a call (like m// [or grammar.parse]), and not on rx// [or regex { ... }].

(The [eg :exhaustive], [or grammar.parse], and [or regex { ... }] bits are extrapolations/interpretations/speculations I've added in this SO answer. They're not in the linked source.)

5 years ago Moritz expressed interest in implementing :exhaustive for matching (not parsing) features. Less than 2 minutes later jnthn showed a one liner that demo'd how he guessed he'd approach it. Less than 30 minutes later Moritz posted a working prototype. The final version landed 7 days later.

1 year ago Moritz said on #perl6 (emphasis added by me): "regexes and grammars aren't a good tool to find all possible ways to parse a string".

Hth.

  • 1
    Thanks for you answer, it's :ex! I wonder, if regexes and grammars aren't a good tool... to parse, then what is? – Eugene Barsky Oct 24 '17 at 21:25
  • 1
    And do you know, is it possible to get access / buy the part of Moritz's book, which has already been completed? – Eugene Barsky Oct 24 '17 at 21:26
  • 1
    @EugeneBarsky "then what is?" -- right?!? I'll let Moritz explain what he meant. First, the quote now links back to the source of the quote to make it one click to read it in its original context. Maybe that'll help. Second, I'm going to go ask Moritz to drop in here. Hth. – raiph Oct 24 '17 at 23:39
  • 2
    You have to read my quote in context; somebody asked about input that leads to ambiguous parse trees; something that is common in natural language processing, for example. In this case, trying to use regexes/grammars to get all combinations leads to an exponential explosion of parse trees, so the whole approach is flawed. Use regexes/grammars for tokenization in this case, and build some kind of statistical model or so on top. Don't expect regexes to be magic :-) – moritz Oct 25 '17 at 6:22
  • 2
    Re my book, a preview isn't available, but it's scheduled to be published in November or December 2017, so you don't have to wait terribly long. It's available for preorder: amzn.to/2y4EQWG and if you want to be notified when it's published, sign up for the mailing list at perl6book.com or follow @perl6org on twitter. – moritz Oct 25 '17 at 6:25

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