142

The code below comes from jQuery UI Autocomplete:

var projects = [
    {
        value: "jquery",
        label: "jQuery",
        desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
        icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
    },
    {
        value: "jquery-ui",
        label: "jQuery UI",
        desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
        icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
    },
    {
        value: "sizzlejs",
        label: "Sizzle JS",
        desc: "a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine",
        icon: "sizzlejs_32x32.png"
    }
];

For example, I want to change the desc value of jquery-ui. How can I do that?

Additionally, is there a faster way to get the data? I mean give the object a name to fetch its data, just like the object inside an array? So it would be something like jquery-ui.jquery-ui.desc = ....

  • You would have to transform the array into a Javascript object in order to use the syntax projects["jquery-ui"].desc. Would that be worth the effort only to get nicer syntax? – Frédéric Hamidi Jan 14 '11 at 10:26
  • I've updated my solution with your latest question. And you can use the "projects.jquery-ui.desc" notation. – Aston Jan 14 '11 at 10:28

19 Answers 19

100

You have to search in the array like:

function changeDesc( value, desc ) {
   for (var i in projects) {
     if (projects[i].value == value) {
        projects[i].desc = desc;
        break; //Stop this loop, we found it!
     }
   }
}

and use it like

var projects = [ ... ];
changeDesc ( 'jquery-ui', 'new description' );

UPDATE:

To get it faster:

var projects = {
   jqueryUi : {
      value:  'lol1',
      desc:   'lol2'
   }
};

projects.jqueryUi.desc = 'new string';

(In according to Frédéric's comment you shouldn't use hyphen in the object key, or you should use "jquery-ui" and projects["jquery-ui"] notation.)

  • Is there much faster way to get the data? I mean give the object a name to fetch its data.Just like the object inside array.So,can I used in that way : jquery-ui.jquery-ui.desc = .... – qinHaiXiang Jan 14 '11 at 10:09
  • yes, create an object instead of a array – Aston Jan 14 '11 at 10:24
  • 1
    your update won't work because of the hyphen - in the object name. You would have to write "jquery-ui": {} and projects["jquery-ui"].desc respectively. – Frédéric Hamidi Jan 14 '11 at 10:30
  • Thank you, I didn't know that. – Aston Jan 14 '11 at 10:35
  • look at the abe kur's answer, that is the right, this and anothers are long – stackdave Aug 14 '18 at 15:42
169

It is quite simple

  • Find the index of the object using findIndex method.
  • Store the index in variable.
  • Do a simple update like this: yourArray[indexThatyouFind]

//Initailize array of objects.
let myArray = [
  {id: 0, name: "Jhon"},
  {id: 1, name: "Sara"},
  {id: 2, name: "Domnic"},
  {id: 3, name: "Bravo"}
],
    
//Find index of specific object using findIndex method.    
objIndex = myArray.findIndex((obj => obj.id == 1));

//Log object to Console.
console.log("Before update: ", myArray[objIndex])

//Update object's name property.
myArray[objIndex].name = "Laila"

//Log object to console again.
console.log("After update: ", myArray[objIndex])

  • 1
    Any reason for the double () on the findIndex method ? – Terkhos Oct 3 '17 at 13:38
  • 2
    just for readability :D – Umair Ahmed Oct 3 '17 at 14:20
  • 2
    it will mutate myArray. – Bimal Grg May 24 '18 at 7:36
  • 1
    Yes, But if you do not want to mutate. [...myArray.slice(0, objIndex), Object.assign({}, myArray[objIndex], myArray.slice(objIndex + 1))] – Umair Ahmed May 24 '18 at 18:26
  • 1
    @UmairAhmed Shouldnt the above code be [...myArray.slice(0, objIndex), Object.assign({}, myArray[objIndex], ...myArray.slice(objIndex + 1))] ? I think ur missing the second ellipses. – Craig Oct 25 '18 at 7:16
34

You can use $.each() to iterate over the array and locate the object you're interested in:

$.each(projects, function() {
    if (this.value == "jquery-ui") {
        this.desc = "Your new description";
    }
});
33

ES6 way, without mutating original data.

var projects = [
{
    value: "jquery",
    label: "jQuery",
    desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
    icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
},
{
    value: "jquery-ui",
    label: "jQuery UI",
    desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
    icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
}];

//find the index of object from array that you want to update
const objIndex = projects.findIndex(obj => obj.value === 'jquery-ui');

// make new object of updated object.   
const updatedObj = { ...projects[objIndex], desc: 'updated desc value'};

// make final new array of objects by combining updated object.
const updatedProjects = [
  ...projects.slice(0, objIndex),
  updatedObj,
  ...projects.slice(objIndex + 1),
];

console.log("original data=", projects);
console.log("updated data=", updatedProjects);
  • awesome, thanks – Son Dang Feb 23 at 11:17
24

The best solution, thanks to ES6.

This returns a new array with a replaced description for the object that contains a value equal to "jquery-ui".

const newProjects = projects.map(p =>
  p.value === 'jquery-ui'
    ? { ...p, desc: 'new description' }
    : p
);
  • 1
    Indeed the best actual solution! Thanks. – Frederiko Cesar Oct 6 at 4:10
17

It's easily can be accomplished with underscore/lodash library:

  _.chain(projects)
   .find({value:"jquery-ui"})
   .merge({desc: "new desc"});

Docs:
https://lodash.com/docs#find
https://lodash.com/docs#merge

  • What if 'jquery-ui' is not found by the find function? – Mika Sep 4 '17 at 12:29
  • Property 'find' does not exist on type 'LoDashExplicitArrayWrapper' – AndrewBenjamin Oct 5 '17 at 16:44
  • The result of such sequences must be unwrapped with _#value. lodash.com/docs/4.17.4#chain .value() – p0k8_ Feb 1 '18 at 4:48
12

you can use .find so in your example

   var projects = [
            {
                value: "jquery",
                label: "jQuery",
                desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
                icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "jquery-ui",
                label: "jQuery UI",
                desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
                icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "sizzlejs",
                label: "Sizzle JS",
                desc: "a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine",
                icon: "sizzlejs_32x32.png"
            }
        ];

let project = projects.find((p) => {
    return p.value === 'jquery-ui';
});

project.desc = 'your value'
  • this is the right answer – stackdave Aug 14 '18 at 15:41
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer in 2019 – James Bailey Jul 22 at 18:25
  • Amazing! +1 – Mike Musni Sep 11 at 14:52
11

you need to know the index of the object you are changing. then its pretty simple

projects[1].desc= "new string";
3

// using higher-order functions to avoiding mutation
var projects = [
            {
                value: "jquery",
                label: "jQuery",
                desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
                icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "jquery-ui",
                label: "jQuery UI",
                desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
                icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "sizzlejs",
                label: "Sizzle JS",
                desc: "a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine",
                icon: "sizzlejs_32x32.png"
            }
        ];

// using higher-order functions to avoiding mutation
index = projects.findIndex(x => x.value === 'jquery-ui');
[... projects.slice(0,index), {'x': 'xxxx'}, ...projects.slice(index + 1, projects.length)];

  • this ... before projects are necessary? – lazzy_ms Aug 29 at 11:46
  • @lazzy_ms the ... is known as the spread operator. google it :) – rmcsharry Sep 15 at 12:36
3

Using map is the best solution without using extra libraries.(using ES6)

const state = [
{
    userId: 1,
    id: 100,
    title: "delectus aut autem",
    completed: false
},
{
    userId: 1,
    id: 101,
    title: "quis ut nam facilis et officia qui",
    completed: false
},
{
    userId: 1,
    id: 102,
    title: "fugiat veniam minus",
    completed: false
},
{
    userId: 1,
    id: 103,
    title: "et porro tempora",
    completed: true
}]

const newState = state.map(obj =>
    obj.id === "101" ? { ...obj, completed: true } : obj
);
2

I think this way is better

const index = projects.findIndex(project => project.value==='jquery-ui');
projects[index].desc = "updated desc";
  • in your findIndex you're assigning a value instead of comparing – avalanche1 Mar 24 at 21:46
  • @avalanche1 yeah u right, edited. – tsadkan yitbarek Mar 25 at 7:17
2

You can use map function --

const answers = this.state.answers.map(answer => {
  if(answer.id === id) return { id: id, value: e.target.value }
  return answer
})

this.setState({ answers: answers })
0

Try this code. it uses jQuery grep function

array = $.grep(array, function (a) {
    if (a.Id == id) {
        a.Value= newValue;
    }
    return a;
});
0

We can also use Array's map function to modify object of an array using Javascript.

function changeDesc(value, desc){
   projects.map((project) => project.value == value ? project.desc = desc : null)
}

changeDesc('jquery', 'new description')
  • this will return [null, object with the updated value, null] – Fernando Caride May 26 '18 at 18:07
0

Find the index first:

function getIndex(array, key, value) {
        var found = false;
        var i = 0;
        while (i<array.length && !found) {
          if (array[i][key]==value) {
            found = true;
            return i;
          }
          i++;
        }
      }

Then:

console.log(getIndex($scope.rides, "_id", id));

Then do what you want with this index, like:

$scope[returnedindex].someKey = "someValue";

Note: please do not use for, since for will check all the array documents, use while with a stopper, so it will stop once it is found, thus faster code.

0

Here i am using angular js. In javascript you can use for loop to find.

    if($scope.bechval>0 &&$scope.bechval!=undefined)
    {

                angular.forEach($scope.model.benhmarkghamlest, function (val, key) {
                $scope.model.benhmarkghamlest[key].bechval = $scope.bechval;

            });
    }
    else {
        alert("Please sepecify Bechmark value");
    }
0

given the following data, we want to replace berries in the summer fruits list with watermelon.

const summerFruits = [
{id:1,name:'apple'}, 
{id:2, name:'orange'}, 
{id:3, name: 'berries'}];

const fruit = {id:3, name: 'watermelon'};

Two ways you can do this.

First approach:

//create a copy of summer fruits.
const summerFruitsCopy = [...summerFruits];

//find index of item to be replaced
const targetIndex = summerFruits.findIndex(f=>f.id===3); 

//replace the object with a new one.
summerFruitsCopy[targetIndex] = fruit;

Second approach: using map, and spread 
const summerFruitsCopy = summerFruits.map(fruitItem => 
fruitItem .id === fruit.id ? 
    {...summerFruits, ...fruit} : fruitItem );

summerFruitsCopy list will now return an array with updated object.

-1

to update multiple items with the matches use:

_.chain(projects).map(item => {
      item.desc = item.value === "jquery-ui" ? "new desc" : item.desc;
      return item;
    })
-1

This is my response to the problem. My underscore version was 1.7 hence I could not use .findIndex.

So I manually got the index of item and replaced it. Here is the code for the same.

 var students = [ 
{id:1,fName:"Ajay", lName:"Singh", age:20, sex:"M" },
{id:2,fName:"Raj", lName:"Sharma", age:21, sex:"M" },
{id:3,fName:"Amar", lName:"Verma", age:22, sex:"M" },
{id:4,fName:"Shiv", lName:"Singh", age:22, sex:"M" }
               ]

Below method will replace the student with id:4 with more attributes in the object

function updateStudent(id) {
 var indexOfRequiredStudent = -1;
    _.each(students,function(student,index) {                    
      if(student.id === id) {                        
           indexOfRequiredStudent = index; return;      
      }});
 students[indexOfRequiredStudent] = _.extend(students[indexOfRequiredStudent],{class:"First Year",branch:"CSE"});           

}

With underscore 1.8 it will be simplified as we have methods _.findIndexOf.

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