281

The code below comes from jQuery UI Autocomplete:

var projects = [
    {
        value: "jquery",
        label: "jQuery",
        desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
        icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
    },
    {
        value: "jquery-ui",
        label: "jQuery UI",
        desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
        icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
    },
    {
        value: "sizzlejs",
        label: "Sizzle JS",
        desc: "a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine",
        icon: "sizzlejs_32x32.png"
    }
];

For example, I want to change the desc value of jquery-ui. How can I do that?

Additionally, is there a faster way to get the data? I mean give the object a name to fetch its data, just like the object inside an array? So it would be something like jquery-ui.jquery-ui.desc = ....

4
  • You would have to transform the array into a Javascript object in order to use the syntax projects["jquery-ui"].desc. Would that be worth the effort only to get nicer syntax? – Frédéric Hamidi Jan 14 '11 at 10:26
  • I've updated my solution with your latest question. And you can use the "projects.jquery-ui.desc" notation. – Aston Jan 14 '11 at 10:28
  • ** ↑ aston means you can use that notation if the object structure is changed as per his answer below. (Not with the OP's existing example structure.) – ashleedawg Oct 27 '20 at 22:04
  • For new people, just use .find() it's a method for the array and is very useful in this case. See abe kur's answer on this. – Tigerrrrr Mar 2 at 3:22

29 Answers 29

179

You have to search in the array like:

function changeDesc( value, desc ) {
   for (var i in projects) {
     if (projects[i].value == value) {
        projects[i].desc = desc;
        break; //Stop this loop, we found it!
     }
   }
}

and use it like

var projects = [ ... ];
changeDesc ( 'jquery-ui', 'new description' );

UPDATE:

To get it faster:

var projects = {
   jqueryUi : {
      value:  'lol1',
      desc:   'lol2'
   }
};

projects.jqueryUi.desc = 'new string';

(In according to Frédéric's comment you shouldn't use hyphen in the object key, or you should use "jquery-ui" and projects["jquery-ui"] notation.)

5
  • Is there much faster way to get the data? I mean give the object a name to fetch its data.Just like the object inside array.So,can I used in that way : jquery-ui.jquery-ui.desc = .... – qinHaiXiang Jan 14 '11 at 10:09
  • 2
    your update won't work because of the hyphen - in the object name. You would have to write "jquery-ui": {} and projects["jquery-ui"].desc respectively. – Frédéric Hamidi Jan 14 '11 at 10:30
  • Thank you, I didn't know that. – Aston Jan 14 '11 at 10:35
  • look at the abe kur's answer, that is the right, this and anothers are long – stackdave Aug 14 '18 at 15:42
  • For new people, just use .find() it's a method for the array and is very useful in this case. See abe kur's answer on this. – Tigerrrrr Mar 2 at 3:22
341

It is quite simple

  • Find the index of the object using findIndex method.
  • Store the index in variable.
  • Do a simple update like this: yourArray[indexThatyouFind]

//Initailize array of objects.
let myArray = [
  {id: 0, name: "Jhon"},
  {id: 1, name: "Sara"},
  {id: 2, name: "Domnic"},
  {id: 3, name: "Bravo"}
],
    
//Find index of specific object using findIndex method.    
objIndex = myArray.findIndex((obj => obj.id == 1));

//Log object to Console.
console.log("Before update: ", myArray[objIndex])

//Update object's name property.
myArray[objIndex].name = "Laila"

//Log object to console again.
console.log("After update: ", myArray[objIndex])

7
  • 4
    Any reason for the double () on the findIndex method ? – Ariel Oct 3 '17 at 13:38
  • 4
    it will mutate myArray. – Bimal Grg May 24 '18 at 7:36
  • 3
    Yes, But if you do not want to mutate. [...myArray.slice(0, objIndex), Object.assign({}, myArray[objIndex], myArray.slice(objIndex + 1))] – Umair Ahmed May 24 '18 at 18:26
  • 1
    @UmairAhmed Shouldnt the above code be [...myArray.slice(0, objIndex), Object.assign({}, myArray[objIndex], ...myArray.slice(objIndex + 1))] ? I think ur missing the second ellipses. – Craig Oct 25 '18 at 7:16
  • 4
    love how clean this is! – tdelam May 10 '19 at 15:36
112

The best solution, thanks to ES6.

This returns a new array with a replaced description for the object that contains a value equal to "jquery-ui".

const newProjects = projects.map(p =>
  p.value === 'jquery-ui'
    ? { ...p, desc: 'new description' }
    : p
);
6
  • 1
    Indeed the best actual solution! Thanks. – Frederiko Cesar Oct 6 '19 at 4:10
  • 4
    @FrederikoCesar not in all cases, iterating over each object costs more than slicing the array and inject the new object using spread operator – Maged Mohamed Feb 29 '20 at 21:33
  • what if you want to change the value on the fly? Without creating another var? Best way is the index method: const targetIndex = summerFruits.findIndex(f=>f.id===3); – Thanasis Apr 18 '20 at 14:16
  • this is great and short. could you write out how you would update two values at the same time from the? the shorthand notation is sure hard to understand for me. ? : are if else whats "..." – SgtPepperAut Aug 27 '20 at 3:07
  • @SgtPepperAut maybe this way: proj.map(p => ['jquery-ui', 'other-value'].includes(p.value) ? { ...p, desc: 'new-description' } : p ) – kintaro Aug 28 '20 at 22:14
68

ES6 way, without mutating original data.

var projects = [
{
    value: "jquery",
    label: "jQuery",
    desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
    icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
},
{
    value: "jquery-ui",
    label: "jQuery UI",
    desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
    icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
}];

//find the index of object from array that you want to update
const objIndex = projects.findIndex(obj => obj.value === 'jquery-ui');

// make new object of updated object.   
const updatedObj = { ...projects[objIndex], desc: 'updated desc value'};

// make final new array of objects by combining updated object.
const updatedProjects = [
  ...projects.slice(0, objIndex),
  updatedObj,
  ...projects.slice(objIndex + 1),
];

console.log("original data=", projects);
console.log("updated data=", updatedProjects);
0
67

Using map is the best solution without using extra libraries.(using ES6)

const state = [
{
    userId: 1,
    id: 100,
    title: "delectus aut autem",
    completed: false
},
{
    userId: 1,
    id: 101,
    title: "quis ut nam facilis et officia qui",
    completed: false
},
{
    userId: 1,
    id: 102,
    title: "fugiat veniam minus",
    completed: false
},
{
    userId: 1,
    id: 103,
    title: "et porro tempora",
    completed: true
}]

const newState = state.map(obj =>
    obj.id === "101" ? { ...obj, completed: true } : obj
);
1
38

You can use $.each() to iterate over the array and locate the object you're interested in:

$.each(projects, function() {
    if (this.value == "jquery-ui") {
        this.desc = "Your new description";
    }
});
20

It's easily can be accomplished with underscore/lodash library:

  _.chain(projects)
   .find({value:"jquery-ui"})
   .merge({desc: "new desc"});

Docs:
https://lodash.com/docs#find
https://lodash.com/docs#merge

3
  • What if 'jquery-ui' is not found by the find function? – Mika Sep 4 '17 at 12:29
  • Property 'find' does not exist on type 'LoDashExplicitArrayWrapper' – AndrewBenjamin Oct 5 '17 at 16:44
  • The result of such sequences must be unwrapped with _#value. lodash.com/docs/4.17.4#chain .value() – p0k8h Feb 1 '18 at 4:48
20

you can use .find so in your example

   var projects = [
            {
                value: "jquery",
                label: "jQuery",
                desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
                icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "jquery-ui",
                label: "jQuery UI",
                desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
                icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "sizzlejs",
                label: "Sizzle JS",
                desc: "a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine",
                icon: "sizzlejs_32x32.png"
            }
        ];

let project = projects.find((p) => {
    return p.value === 'jquery-ui';
});

project.desc = 'your value'
1
17

given the following data, we want to replace berries in the summerFruits list with watermelon.

const summerFruits = [
{id:1,name:'apple'}, 
{id:2, name:'orange'}, 
{id:3, name: 'berries'}];

const fruit = {id:3, name: 'watermelon'};

Two ways you can do this.

First approach:

//create a copy of summer fruits.
const summerFruitsCopy = [...summerFruits];

//find index of item to be replaced
const targetIndex = summerFruits.findIndex(f=>f.id===3); 

//replace the object with a new one.
summerFruitsCopy[targetIndex] = fruit;

Second approach: using map, and spread:

const summerFruitsCopy = summerFruits.map(fruitItem => 
fruitItem .id === fruit.id ? 
    {...summerFruits, ...fruit} : fruitItem );

summerFruitsCopy list will now return an array with updated object.

1
  • The first method is best. No need to move to another var and then back. On the fly method. I up voted your solution. – Thanasis Apr 18 '20 at 14:18
14

you need to know the index of the object you are changing. then its pretty simple

projects[1].desc= "new string";
11

I think this way is better

const index = projects.findIndex(project => project.value==='jquery-ui');
projects[index].desc = "updated desc";
1
  • in your findIndex you're assigning a value instead of comparing – avalanche1 Mar 24 '19 at 21:46
9

This is another answer involving find. This relies on the fact that find:

  • iterates through every object in the array UNTIL a match is found
  • each object is provided to you and is MODIFIABLE

Here's the critical Javascript snippet:

projects.find( function (p) {
    if (p.value !== 'jquery-ui') return false;
    p.desc = 'your value';
    return true;
} );

Here's an alternate version of the same Javascript:

projects.find( function (p) {
    if (p.value === 'jquery-ui') {
        p.desc = 'your value';
        return true;
    }
    return false;
} );

Here's an even shorter (and somewhat more evil version):

projects.find( p => p.value === 'jquery-ui' && ( p.desc = 'your value', true ) );

Here's a full working version:

  var projects = [
            {
                value: "jquery",
                label: "jQuery",
                desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
                icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "jquery-ui",
                label: "jQuery UI",
                desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
                icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "sizzlejs",
                label: "Sizzle JS",
                desc: "a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine",
                icon: "sizzlejs_32x32.png"
            }
        ];

projects.find( p => p.value === 'jquery-ui' && ( p.desc = 'your value', true ) );

console.log( JSON.stringify( projects, undefined, 2 ) );

1
  • 1
    Wow, this is some piece of magic you just did there! – Noam Gal Aug 25 '20 at 6:15
4

// using higher-order functions to avoiding mutation
var projects = [
            {
                value: "jquery",
                label: "jQuery",
                desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
                icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "jquery-ui",
                label: "jQuery UI",
                desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
                icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
            },
            {
                value: "sizzlejs",
                label: "Sizzle JS",
                desc: "a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine",
                icon: "sizzlejs_32x32.png"
            }
        ];

// using higher-order functions to avoiding mutation
index = projects.findIndex(x => x.value === 'jquery-ui');
[... projects.slice(0,index), {'x': 'xxxx'}, ...projects.slice(index + 1, projects.length)];

2
  • this ... before projects are necessary? – lazzy_ms Aug 29 '19 at 11:46
  • @lazzy_ms the ... is known as the spread operator. google it :) – rmcsharry Sep 15 '19 at 12:36
3

You can use map function --

const answers = this.state.answers.map(answer => {
  if(answer.id === id) return { id: id, value: e.target.value }
  return answer
})

this.setState({ answers: answers })
3

try using forEach(item,index) helper

var projects = [
    {
        value: "jquery",
        label: "jQuery",
        desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
        icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
    },
    {
        value: "jquery-ui",
        label: "jQuery UI",
        desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
        icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
    },
    {
        value: "sizzlejs",
        label: "Sizzle JS",
        desc: "a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine",
        icon: "sizzlejs_32x32.png"
    }
];

let search_to_change = 'jquery'

projects.forEach((item,index)=>{
   if(item.value == search_to_change )
      projects[index].desc = 'your description ' 
})

1

We can also use Array's map function to modify object of an array using Javascript.

function changeDesc(value, desc){
   projects.map((project) => project.value == value ? project.desc = desc : null)
}

changeDesc('jquery', 'new description')
1
  • this will return [null, object with the updated value, null] – Fernando Caride May 26 '18 at 18:07
1

Here is a nice neat clear answer. I wasn't 100% sure this would work but it seems to be fine. Please let me know if a lib is required for this, but I don't think one is. Also if this doesn't work in x browser please let me know. I tried this in Chrome IE11 and Edge they all seemed to work fine.

    var Students = [
        { ID: 1, FName: "Ajay", LName: "Test1", Age: 20},
        { ID: 2, FName: "Jack", LName: "Test2", Age: 21},
        { ID: 3, FName: "John", LName: "Test3", age: 22},
        { ID: 4, FName: "Steve", LName: "Test4", Age: 22}
    ]

    Students.forEach(function (Student) {
        if (Student.LName == 'Test1') {
            Student.LName = 'Smith'
        }
        if (Student.LName == 'Test2') {
            Student.LName = 'Black'
        }
    });

    Students.forEach(function (Student) {
        document.write(Student.FName + " " + Student.LName + "<BR>");
    });

Output should be as follows

Ajay Smith

Jack Black

John Test3

Steve Test4

0

Try this code. it uses jQuery grep function

array = $.grep(array, function (a) {
    if (a.Id == id) {
        a.Value= newValue;
    }
    return a;
});
0
0

Find the index first:

function getIndex(array, key, value) {
        var found = false;
        var i = 0;
        while (i<array.length && !found) {
          if (array[i][key]==value) {
            found = true;
            return i;
          }
          i++;
        }
      }

Then:

console.log(getIndex($scope.rides, "_id", id));

Then do what you want with this index, like:

$scope[returnedindex].someKey = "someValue";

Note: please do not use for, since for will check all the array documents, use while with a stopper, so it will stop once it is found, thus faster code.

0

Here i am using angular js. In javascript you can use for loop to find.

    if($scope.bechval>0 &&$scope.bechval!=undefined)
    {

                angular.forEach($scope.model.benhmarkghamlest, function (val, key) {
                $scope.model.benhmarkghamlest[key].bechval = $scope.bechval;

            });
    }
    else {
        alert("Please sepecify Bechmark value");
    }
0

You can create your specific function like the below, then use that everywhere you need.

var each    = (arr, func) => 
                Array.from(
                    (function* (){
                        var i = 0;
                        for(var item of arr)
                            yield func(item, i++);
                    })()
                );

Enjoy..

1
  • Welcome to the community, if you explain what is going on and how it is working, then obviously everyone can Enjoy.. – Danish Jan 31 at 11:46
0
upsert(array, item) { 
        const i = array.findIndex(_item => _item.id === item.id);
        if (i > -1) {
            let result = array.filter(obj => obj.id !== item.id);
            return [...result, item]
        }
        else {
            return [...array, item]
        };
    }
0

The power of javascript destructuring

const projects = [
  {
    value: 'jquery',
    label: 'jQuery',
    desc: 'the write less, do more, JavaScript library',
    icon: 'jquery_32x32.png',
    anotherObj: {
      value: 'jquery',
      label: 'jQuery',
      desc: 'the write less, do more, JavaScript library',
      icon: 'jquery_32x32.png',
    },
  },
  {
    value: 'jquery-ui',
    label: 'jQuery UI',
    desc: 'the official user interface library for jQuery',
    icon: 'jqueryui_32x32.png',
  },
  {
    value: 'sizzlejs',
    label: 'Sizzle JS',
    desc: 'a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine',
    icon: 'sizzlejs_32x32.png',
  },
];

function createNewDate(date) {
  const newDate = [];
  date.map((obj, index) => {
    if (index === 0) {
      newDate.push({
        ...obj,
        value: 'Jquery??',
        label: 'Jquery is not that good',
        anotherObj: {
          ...obj.anotherObj,
          value: 'Javascript',
          label: 'Javascript',
          desc: 'Write more!!! do more!! with JavaScript',
          icon: 'javascript_4kx4k.4kimage',
        },
      });
    } else {
      newDate.push({
        ...obj,
      });
    }
  });

  return newDate;
}

console.log(createNewDate(projects));

0

Assuming you wanted to run a bit more complicated codes during the modification, you might reach for an if-else statement over the ternary operator approach

// original 'projects' array;
var projects = [
    {
        value: "jquery",
        label: "jQuery",
        desc: "the write less, do more, JavaScript library",
        icon: "jquery_32x32.png"
    },
    {
        value: "jquery-ui",
        label: "jQuery UI",
        desc: "the official user interface library for jQuery",
        icon: "jqueryui_32x32.png"
    },
    {
        value: "sizzlejs",
        label: "Sizzle JS",
        desc: "a pure-JavaScript CSS selector engine",
        icon: "sizzlejs_32x32.png"
    }
];
// modify original 'projects' array, and save modified array into 'projects' variable
projects = projects.map(project => {
// When there's an object where key 'value' has value 'jquery-ui'
    if (project.value == 'jquery-ui') {

// do stuff and set a new value for where object's key is 'value'
        project.value = 'updated value';

// do more stuff and also set a new value for where the object's key is 'label', etc.
        project.label = 'updated label';

// now return modified object
        return project;
    } else {
// just return object as is
        return project;
    }
});

// log modified 'projects' array
console.log(projects);
0

const users = [
  { name: "Alex", age: 25 },
  { name: "John", age: 32 },
];

const newUsers = users.map((user) => ({
  ...user,
  age: user.age + 5, // just for example
}));

// newUsers = [
// {name:"Alex" , age:30},
// {name:"John , age:37}
// ]

-1

to update multiple items with the matches use:

_.chain(projects).map(item => {
      item.desc = item.value === "jquery-ui" ? "new desc" : item.desc;
      return item;
    })
-1

Let you want to update value of array[2] = "data"

    for(i=0;i<array.length;i++){
      if(i == 2){
         array[i] = "data";
        }
    }
2
  • Is this an answer or a question? – tabdiukov Jan 13 '20 at 12:46
  • 2
    You successfully updated the 2nd item in that array in the most complicated way possible. – BlueWater86 Jan 13 '20 at 12:56
-1
let thismoth = moment(new Date()).format('MMMM');
months.sort(function (x, y) { return x == thismoth ? -1 : y == thismoth ? 1 : 0; });
1
  • 1
    Please provide a description to your answer. – Lajos Arpad Feb 5 '20 at 14:58
-2

This is my response to the problem. My underscore version was 1.7 hence I could not use .findIndex.

So I manually got the index of item and replaced it. Here is the code for the same.

 var students = [ 
{id:1,fName:"Ajay", lName:"Singh", age:20, sex:"M" },
{id:2,fName:"Raj", lName:"Sharma", age:21, sex:"M" },
{id:3,fName:"Amar", lName:"Verma", age:22, sex:"M" },
{id:4,fName:"Shiv", lName:"Singh", age:22, sex:"M" }
               ]

Below method will replace the student with id:4 with more attributes in the object

function updateStudent(id) {
 var indexOfRequiredStudent = -1;
    _.each(students,function(student,index) {                    
      if(student.id === id) {                        
           indexOfRequiredStudent = index; return;      
      }});
 students[indexOfRequiredStudent] = _.extend(students[indexOfRequiredStudent],{class:"First Year",branch:"CSE"});           

}

With underscore 1.8 it will be simplified as we have methods _.findIndexOf.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.