import ftplib
import urllib2
import os
import logging
logger = logging.getLogger('ftpuploader')
hdlr = logging.FileHandler('ftplog.log')
formatter = logging.Formatter('%(asctime)s %(levelname)s %(message)s')
hdlr.setFormatter(formatter)
logger.addHandler(hdlr)
logger.setLevel(logging.INFO)
FTPADDR = "some ftp address"

def upload_to_ftp(con, filepath):
    try:
        f = open(filepath,'rb')                # file to send
        con.storbinary('STOR '+ filepath, f)         # Send the file
        f.close()                                # Close file and FTP
        logger.info('File successfully uploaded to '+ FTPADDR)
    except, e:
        logger.error('Failed to upload to ftp: '+ str(e))

This doesn't seem to work, I get syntax error, what is the proper way of doing this for logging all kind of exceptions to a file

  • 2
    Your indentation is broken. And omit the , after except. – Sven Marnach Jan 14 '11 at 11:35
  • 3
    @SvenMarnach, if you omit the , after except, you'll get global name 'e' is not defined, which is not much better than wrong syntax. – Val Nov 18 '13 at 11:11
  • 7
    @Val: Should be except Exception as e or except Exception, e, depending on Python version. – Sven Marnach Nov 19 '13 at 13:03
up vote 319 down vote accepted

You have to define which type of exception you want to catch. So write except Exception, e: instead of except, e: for a general exception (that will be logged anyway).

Other possibility is to write your whole try/except code this way:

try:
    with open(filepath,'rb') as f:
        con.storbinary('STOR '+ filepath, f)
    logger.info('File successfully uploaded to '+ FTPADDR)
except Exception, e:
    logger.error('Failed to upload to ftp: '+ str(e))

in Python 3.x and modern versions of Python 2.x use except Exception as e instead of except Exception, e:

try:
    with open(filepath,'rb') as f:
        con.storbinary('STOR '+ filepath, f)
    logger.info('File successfully uploaded to '+ FTPADDR)
except Exception as e:
    logger.error('Failed to upload to ftp: '+ str(e))
  • 27
    repr(e) gives you the exception(and the message string); str(e) only gives the message string. – whitebeard Jul 30 '16 at 11:28
  • 3
    As an alternative for logging exception you could use logger.exception(e) instead. It will log the exception with traceback at the same logging.ERROR level. – mbdevpl Aug 31 '16 at 9:50
  • 1
    @mbdevpl this doesn't seem to be true. It appears to call str() on the exception: ideone.com/OaCOpO – KevinOrr Oct 4 '16 at 20:08
  • 2
    except Exception, e: throws a Syntax error to me in python 3. Is this expected? – Charlie Parker Nov 1 '17 at 4:12
  • 13
    @CharlieParker in Python3 write except Exception as e: – eumiro Nov 1 '17 at 5:38

The syntax is no longer supported in python 3. Use the following instead.

try:
    do_something()
except BaseException as e:
    logger.error('Failed to do something: ' + str(e))
  • 3
    Thank you for having what seems like the only explanation of this for Python 3. Two years later. – user9993 Nov 28 '15 at 20:17
  • 1
    Actually, you should use logger.error('Failed to do something: %s', str(e)) That way, if your logger level is above error it doesn't do the string interpolation. – avyfain Feb 24 '16 at 23:19
  • 4
    @avyfain - You are incorrect. The statement logging.error('foo %s', str(e)) will always convert e to a string. To achieve what you are afterm you would use logging.error('foo %s', e) - thereby allowing the logging framework to do (or not do) the conversion. – Ron Dahlgren Jul 11 '16 at 23:29
  • Are you sure about that @RonDahlgren? I was under the impression that logging.error('message %s', expression) was lazily evaluated regardless of the expression, and only interpolates the string if the log is actually going to be output anywhere. – avyfain Jul 12 '16 at 3:56
  • 1
    You can verify in a python REPL (here with Python 3.5.2 and ipython): see my gist here – Ron Dahlgren Jul 12 '16 at 15:27

Updating this to something simpler for logger (works for both python 2 and 3). You do not need traceback module.

import logging

logger = logging.Logger('catch_all')

def catchEverythingInLog():
    try:
        ... do something ...
    except Exception as e:
        logger.error(e, exc_info=True)
        ... exception handling ...

This is now the old way (though still works):

import sys, traceback

def catchEverything():
    try:
        ... some operation(s) ...
    except:
        exc_type, exc_value, exc_traceback = sys.exc_info()
        ... exception handling ...

exc_value is the error message.

  • This would be my preferred method. Just printing the string is useful for logging I suppose, but if I need to do anything with that information I need more than just a string. – skeletalbassman Mar 30 '16 at 18:31

There are some cases where you can use the e.message or e.messages.. But it does not work in all cases. Anyway the more safe is to use the str(e)

try:
  ...
except Exception as e:
  print(e.message)
  • 28
    The problem with this is, for example, if you except Exception as e, and e is an IOError, you get e.errno, e.filename, and e.strerror, but apparently no e.message (at least in Python 2.7.12). If you want to capture the error message, use str(e), as in the other answers. – epalm Apr 19 '17 at 18:28

You can use logger.exception("msg") for logging exception with traceback:

try:
    #your code
except Exception as e:
    logger.exception('Failed: ' + str(e))
  • Coincidently, e.msg is the string representation of Exception class. – MarkHu Mar 3 '16 at 20:54
  • 2
    Or simply logger.exception(e). – mbdevpl Aug 31 '16 at 9:52

You can try specifying the BaseException type explicitly. However, this will only catch derivatives of BaseException. While this includes all implementation-provided exceptions, it is also possibly to raise arbitrary old-style classes.

try:
  do_something()
except BaseException, e:
  logger.error('Failed to do something: ' + str(e))

If you want error class, error message and stack trace (or either of them), use sys.exec_info().

Minimal working code with some formatting,

import sys
import traceback

try:
    ans = 1/0
except BaseException as ex:
    # Get current system exception
    ex_type, ex_value, ex_traceback = sys.exc_info()

    # Extract unformatter stack traces as tuples
    trace_back = traceback.extract_tb(ex_traceback)

    # Format stacktrace
    stack_trace = list()

    for trace in trace_back:
        stack_trace.append("File : %s , Line : %d, Func.Name : %s, Message : %s" % (trace[0], trace[1], trace[2], trace[3]))

    print("Exception type : %s " % ex_type.__name__)
    print("Exception message : %s" %ex_value)
    print("Stack trace : %s" %stack_trace)

Which will give out following output,

Exception type : ZeroDivisionError
Exception message : division by zero
Stack trace : ['File : .\\test.py , Line : 5, Func.Name : <module>, Message : ans = 1/0']

sys.exec_info()

This gives you the exception details about most recent exception. It return a tuple. Following are the tuple values (type, value, traceback).

traceback is an instance of traceback object. You can format the trace with provided methods. More can be found from traceback documentation

  • Using e.__class__.__name__ can return the exception class as well. – kenorb Jun 14 at 20:13

Use str(ex) to print execption

try:
   #your code
except ex:
   print(str(ex))

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