I wanted to design something as like below image, but not sure how to do!

Title with three dots

enter image description here

So I wanted to display only 3 dots on center below my title. But when I try with dotted border-bottom it takes entire <h1> tag.

h1{
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 50px;
  color: red;
  border-bottom: 10px dotted red;
}
<h1>My Title</h1>

  • 4
    It has to be said. The HTML entity &hellip; generates the glyph called a horizontal ellipsis. This is what typographers use … to represent three dots ( when they mean something is omitted ). – O. Jones Oct 24 '17 at 15:58
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try something as like below snippet. Use spans to create dots and align them center.

h1 {
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 50px;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
  color: red;
}

.three-dots {
  text-align: center;
}

.three-dots span {
  width: 15px;
  height: 15px;
  border-radius: 50%;
  background: red;
  display: inline-block;
  margin: 0 5px;
}
<h1>My Title</h1>
<div class="three-dots">
  <span></span>
  <span></span>
  <span></span>
</div>

Update: Yes of course, i accept that this is not the perfect solution. But same time am sure this will be one of the best solution where you can customize each dots with different color and size in easy way as below snippet. Otherwise i would agree Manish Patel answer is the best one.

h1 {
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 50px;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
  color: red;
}

.three-dots {
  text-align: center;
}

.three-dots span {
  width: 15px;
  height: 15px;
  border-radius: 50%;
  background: red;
  display: inline-block;
  margin: 0 5px;
}

span.first {
  background-color: green;
  width: 10px;
  height: 10px;
}

span.third {
  background-color: blue;
  width: 20px;
  height: 20px;
}
<h1>My Title</h1>
<div class="three-dots">
  <span class="first"></span>
  <span class="second"></span>
  <span class="third"></span>
</div>

  • 2
    Although works but not an efficient solution. – Mohammad Usman Oct 24 '17 at 10:25
  • 10
    Each element that you add consumes browser's memory. You have used one div and three span elements. While this can be achieved with only one div element. See @Manish's answer which is the best so far. – Mohammad Usman Oct 24 '17 at 10:37
  • 17
    Maybe more important: You have to add those divs and spans below every h1 heading on the site, and if you ever want to change the style, you have to replace them, or change the number of spans. Kind of defeats the purpose of using CSS in the first place. – tobias_k Oct 24 '17 at 13:11
  • 7
    @MohammadUsman: three extra spans are completely unlikely to make any difference in the memory consumption, and even if you have thousands of them, well I'd say you have bigger issues in your design. However tobias_k gave the real reason why this answer is not a good one. – Sébastien Deprez Oct 24 '17 at 15:52
  • 1
    @SébastienDeprez Idea is the same but expressed in 2 different ways. My point was to use only signle element whether it is h1 or div (not both). If you will have thoughts while designing a page that adding 2 or 3 extra elements won't make any difference, you will end up with a page that will have much more extra elements. May be not very obvious but its bad practice in my opinion. – Mohammad Usman Oct 25 '17 at 5:38

Used ::after pseudo element for that

h1{
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 50px;
  color: red;
  line-height: 30px;
}
h1::after{
  content:"...";
  font-size: 50px;
  color: gold;
  display: block;
  text-align: center;
  letter-spacing: 5px;
}
<h1>My Title</h1>

  • 2
    This won't work as soon as you adopt the same font-family that the question's author used. Arial uses squared dots. That is why in my example i switched the font to another font-family. – Alessandro Incarnati Oct 24 '17 at 12:58
  • 4
    You could try with &#8226; (•, &#9679;: "●" or &#11044;: "⬤"), instead of playing with font size! – F. Hauri Oct 24 '17 at 15:13
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer – Gerard Simpson Oct 25 '17 at 1:42

One pseudo-element and a multiple drop shadows. (drop or box)

Note: with this method you can control the color of each dot.

Drop Shadow

  h1 {
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 50px;
  color: red;
  position: relative;
}

h1::after {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  width: .25em;
  height: .25em;
  border-radius: 50%;
  background: orange;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 50%;
  margin-bottom: -.5em;
  transform: translateX(-50%);
  filter: drop-shadow(.5em 0px 0px blue) 
          drop-shadow(-.5em 0px 0px green);
}
<h1>My Title</h1>

Box Shadow (thanks to Ilmari Karonen)

  h1 {
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 50px;
  color: red;
  position: relative;
}

h1::after {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  width: .25em;
  height: .25em;
  border-radius: 50%;
  background: orange;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 50%;
  margin-bottom: -.5em;
  transform: translateX(-50%);
  box-shadow: .5em 0px 0px blue, 
              -.5em 0px 0px green;
}
<h1>My Title</h1>

  • 4
    Now the one with perfectly right process.. +1 from me :) – codesayan Oct 24 '17 at 10:37
  • For me (Chromium 61 on Ubuntu Linux) the middle orange dot has a funny greenish ring around it. Changing the background color from orange to white makes it really obvious. I don't know why it's there, but it seems like the color of the ring matches the color of the last drop shadow. – Ilmari Karonen Oct 24 '17 at 21:03
  • Ps. It seems that replacing the filter property with the (supposedly) equivalent box-shadow: .5em 0px 0px blue, -.5em 0px 0px green gets rid of the weird ring around the middle dot. – Ilmari Karonen Oct 24 '17 at 21:11
  • Thanks for that....added second solution with box-shadow. – Paulie_D Oct 24 '17 at 21:18
  • 1
    This is the most interesting solution of all. – AlbertSamuel Oct 30 '17 at 2:39

Use ::after pseudo element.

h1{
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 50px;
}
h1:after{
  content: "";
  display: block;
  width: 50px;
  margin: 10px auto;
  border-bottom: 10px dotted red
}
<h1>My title</h1>

  • These don't look much like circles… – Cody Gray Oct 24 '17 at 11:23
  • 3
    Interesting, I didn't know that border-style: dotted produces squares in any browser. Which one do you use? – wscourge Oct 24 '17 at 12:57
  • 2
    I believe Firefox uses square dots. – Paulie_D Oct 24 '17 at 13:11
  • 4
    I was looking at it in Safari on macOS. Firefox on Linux seems to use round dots. I did not realize this was paltform-dependent, either. – Cody Gray Oct 24 '17 at 13:39
  • 1
    Don't just calculate the dimension, you're begging for problems. For me (Firefox 56, Linux, default fonts) it displays just two dots. Round, though :-) – The Vee Oct 24 '17 at 15:46

Just use the ::after pseudo-selector and define a line-height for your h1 element to vertically space the dots from the title. Use Georgia as web font for the dots as Arial has squared dots.

Remember you can use both syntax but is preferably use the ::afterto distinguish pseudo-classes from pseudo-elements.

/* CSS3 syntax */
::after

/* CSS2 syntax */
:after

CSS3 introduced the ::after notation (with two colons) to distinguish pseudo-classes from pseudo-elements. Browsers also accept :after, introduced in CSS2. Caveats

h1{
  text-align: center;
  font-family: Arial;
  font-size: 40px;
  color: black;
  line-height: 20px;
}

h1::after {
   content: '...';
   display: block;
   font-family: Georgia, sans-serif;
   font-size: 100px;
   color: #FEC832;
}
<h1>My Heading</h1>

Same manish-patel's answer, but...

As I prefer to

  • not force font size
  • use adaptive em size unit instead of fixed pt or px.
  • Keep It Short and Simple

This will use UTF-8, one of black circle:

&#10625;   U+2981    Z NOTATION SPOT          ⦁
&#8226;    U+2022    BULLET                   •
&#9679;    U+25CF    BLACK CIRCLE             ●
&#9899;    U+26AB    MEDIUM BLACK CIRCLE      ⚫
&#11044;   U+2B24    BLACK LARGE CIRCLE       ⬤

h1{
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 1.3em;
}
h1::after{
  content:"⚫ ⚫ ⚫";
  color: gold;
  display: block;
}
<h1>My Title</h1>

With a little enhancement: adding blur border to dots

h1        { text-align: center; line-height: 1.3em; }
h1::after { content:"⚫ ⚫ ⚫"; color: gold; display: block;
            text-shadow: 0em 0em .12em #530; }
<h1>My Title</h1>

A solution with flexbox:

h1 {
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 48px;
  color: black;
  line-height: 24px;
}
h1::after {
    content: "...";
    font-size: 72px;
    color: gold;
    display: flex;
    justify-content: center;
    letter-spacing: 5px
}
<h1>
  My Heading
</h1>

Here is another solution in the same way as the solution of Paulie_D but instead of drop-shadow/box-shadow, I am going to rely on multiple radial-gradient to create each circle. Then you can easily control the number of circles, their position, colors, and size.

3 Circles as needed

h1 {
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 50px;
  color: red;
  position: relative;
}

h1::after {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  width: 1.5em;
  height: .25em;
  background: radial-gradient(circle at center, blue 50%,transparent 51%) 0 -4px/11px 21px no-repeat, 
              radial-gradient(circle at center, orange 50%,transparent 51%) .6em -4px/11px 21px no-repeat,
              radial-gradient(circle at center, green 50%,transparent 51%) 1.2em -4px/11px 21px no-repeat;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 50%;
  margin-bottom: -.5em;
  transform: translateX(-50%);
}
<h1>My Title</h1>

5 Circles (and we go to any numbers)

h1 {
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 50px;
  color: red;
  position: relative;
}

h1::after {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  width: 1.5em;
  height: .25em;
  background: radial-gradient(circle at center, blue 50%,transparent 51%) 0 -4px/11px 21px no-repeat, 
              radial-gradient(circle at center, orange 50%,transparent 51%) .3em -4px/11px 21px no-repeat,
              radial-gradient(circle at center, brown 50%,transparent 51%) .6em -4px/11px 21px no-repeat,
              radial-gradient(circle at center, pink 50%,transparent 51%) .9em -4px/11px 21px no-repeat,
              radial-gradient(circle at center, green 50%,transparent 51%) 1.2em -4px/11px 21px no-repeat;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 50%;
  margin-bottom: -.5em;
  transform: translateX(-50%);
}
<h1>My Title</h1>

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.