4

I am trying to calculate the sum of this sequence in R.

The sequence will have two Inputs (1 and 11) in the below case,

1 + (1 * 2/3 ) + (1 * 2/3 * 4/5) + ( 1 * 2/3 * 4/5 * 6/7) + ....................(1 *......10/11)

I think, defining my own is the way to go here.

  • Does this sequence have any mathematical name? – amrrs Oct 24 '17 at 10:51
  • 1
    Is this term (1 * 2/3) missing? – Jimbou Oct 24 '17 at 10:51
  • @Jimbou Yes Sorry, just updated the question. Thanks – Siddharth Oct 24 '17 at 10:52
  • @amrrs No, I am afraid - It doesn't follow an AP or GP Series to my knowledge. – Siddharth Oct 24 '17 at 10:53
  • So the increment is always one right? – amrrs Oct 24 '17 at 10:56
4

You could try just using old-fashioned loops here:

sum <- 0
num_terms <- 6
for (i in 1:num_terms) {
    y <- 1
    if (i > 1) {
        for (j in 1:(i-1)) {
            y <- y * (j*2 / (j*2 + 1))
        }
    }
    sum <- sum + y
}

You can set num_terms to any value you want, from 1 to a higher value. In this case, I use 6 terms because this is the requested number of terms in your question.

Someone will probably come along and reduce the entire code snippet above to one line, but in my mind an explicit loop is justified here.

Here is a link to a demo which prints out the values being used in each of the terms, for verification purposes:

Demo

  • Great. Thank you so much :) – Siddharth Oct 24 '17 at 11:18
2

My approach:

# input
start <- 1
n <- 5 # number of terms

end <- start + n*2

result <- start
to_add <- start

for (i in (start + 1):(end-1)) {
  to_add <- to_add * (i / (i + 1))
  result <- result + to_add
}

which gives:

> result
[1] 4.039755
  • This may not give the results you intend. For example, if start=1 and end=2, the bounds of your for loop would be for (i in 2:1). – Tim Biegeleisen Oct 25 '17 at 1:50
  • Hmm true. I've modified the code so that the input is the starting number and the number of terms following – brettljausn Oct 25 '17 at 6:02
1

Another base R alternative using cumprod to generate the inner terms is

sum(cumprod(c(1, seq(2, 10, 2)) / c(1, seq(3, 11, 2))))
[1] 3.4329

Here, c(1, seq(2, 10, 2)) / c(1, seq(3, 11, 2)) generates the sequence 1, 2/3, 4/5, 6/7, 8/9, 10/11 and cumprod takes the cumulative product. This result is summed with sum. The returned result is identical to the one in the accepted answer.

  • This is quite similar to identical to my comment a <- seq(1, 11, 2); sum(c(1,cumprod((a-1)[-1]))/cumprod(a)) – Jimbou Oct 24 '17 at 14:41
  • @Jimbou Yes. I saw that comment after I worked out this answer and posted it. If you want to add it to your answer, let me know and I'll delete it. – lmo Oct 24 '17 at 18:10
1

you can try:

library(tidyverse)
Result <- tibble(a=seq(1, 11, 2)) %>%
  mutate(b=lag(a, default = 0)+1) %>% 
  mutate(Prod=cumprod(b)/cumprod(a)) %>%  
  mutate(Sum=cumsum(Prod)) 
Result 
  # A tibble: 6 x 4
      a     b      Prod      Sum
  <dbl> <dbl>     <dbl>    <dbl>
1     1     1 1.0000000 1.000000
2     3     2 0.6666667 1.666667
3     5     4 0.5333333 2.200000
4     7     6 0.4571429 2.657143
5     9     8 0.4063492 3.063492
6    11    10 0.3694084 3.432900

# and some graphical analysis
Result %>% 
  ggplot(aes(as.factor(a), Prod, group=1)) + 
    geom_col(aes(as.factor(a), Sum), alpha=0.4)+ 
    geom_point() + 
    geom_line() 

enter image description here

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