I have an object and I want to iterate over some specific keys of that object. How to achieve this?

Consider the snippet below:

How can I iterate over table1,table2 and table3 keys and not all of them?

var table_object = {
  table1: "hello world",
  table1_name: "greetings_english.html",
  table2: "hola",
  table2_name: "greetings_spanish.html",
  table3: "Bonjour",
  table3_name: "greetings_french.html"
};

  • Instead of for (var key in table_object) just use for (var key of ["table1", …])? – Bergi Oct 25 '17 at 12:34
  • It can be, but the keys will be dynamically created on an event's occurrence and named considering the number of files. – Karan Dhir Oct 25 '17 at 12:37
  • Then maybe you want to store the number of files, and use for (var i=1; i<=fileCount; i++) { var key = "table"+i; … } – Bergi Oct 25 '17 at 12:40
  • Or maybe it would be much easier if you stored the tables and tablenames as two separate arrays. – Bergi Oct 25 '17 at 12:41
  • Why did you tag this jquery if you want vanilla js? – Jared Smith Oct 25 '17 at 13:04
up vote 15 down vote accepted

You could filter the keys and then iterate the rest.

var table_object = { table1: "hello world", table1_name: "greetings_english.html", table2: "hola", table2_name: "greetings_spanish.html", table3: "Bonjour", table3_name: "greetings_french.html" };

Object
    .keys(table_object)
    .filter(function (k) { return !/_/.test(k); })
    .forEach(function (k) { console.log(table_object[k]); });

  • /^table(\d+)$/ will explicitly match table followed by some digits. – E730 Oct 25 '17 at 13:27
  • @E730, right, but that limits to table prefix. – Nina Scholz Oct 25 '17 at 13:31
  • @NinaScholz not a prefix, it's wrapped in ^$. – kamoroso94 Oct 25 '17 at 13:48
  • yes, but you are limited to table. – Nina Scholz Oct 25 '17 at 13:49
  • /^([a-zA-Z0-9$]+)$/, or /^([a-zA-Z$]+)(\d+)$/. Or you can change the regex, or the whole filter function. – E730 Oct 26 '17 at 12:34

You have to specify which keys you have to iterate through:

var table_object = {
  table1: "hello world",
  table1_name: "greetings_english.html",
  table2: "hola",
  table2_name: "greetings_spanish.html",
  table3: "Bonjour",
  table3_name: "greetings_french.html"
};

var keysToIterateThrough = ["table1", "table2", "table3"];
keysToIterateThrough.forEach(key => {
    var value = table_object[key];
    console.log(`key: ${key} => value: ${value}`);
})

  • Is an option, but filtering by regex is also an option. – E730 Oct 25 '17 at 13:26

You have to use Object.keys in order to find out all the object keys then apply a filter method in order to filter them.

var table_object = {
  table1: "hello world",
  table1_name: "greetings_english.html",
  table2: "hola",
  table2_name: "greetings_spanish.html",
  table3: "Bonjour",
  table3_name: "greetings_french.html"
};
var keysToIterate = ["table1", "table2", "table3_name"];
let values=Object.keys(table_object)
                .filter(a=>keysToIterate.includes(a))
                .map(a=> table_object[a]);
console.log(values);

  • 2
    Wouldn't it be simpler (and probably more efficient) to do keysToIterate.filter(a => a in table_object) instead of Object.keys(table_object).filter(a => keysToIterate.includes(a))? – Ilmari Karonen Oct 25 '17 at 11:26
  • @IlmariKaronen, no, because keysToIterate is the array with keys we needed. He have to filter the keys of object. – Mihai Alexandru-Ionut Oct 25 '17 at 12:03
  • @IlmariKaronen Yes, that would work. Whether it's more efficient depends on how large the object usually is and how often the keysToIterate are not part of the object. – Bergi Oct 25 '17 at 12:33

Could try something like

var keys = ['table1', 'table2', 'table3']
Object.keys(table_object).forEach(function(key) {
    if (keys.indexOf(key) != -1) {
        var table_value = table_object[key]
    }
})
  • You can speed it up by iterating over keys. – E730 Oct 25 '17 at 13:21

It may not be possible to iterate over limited keys, but you can have an array of keys which you want to iterate. Then loop over that array to get the corresponding value from the object

var objKeys = ['table1', 'table2', 'table3']

var table_object = {
  table1: "hello world",
  table1_name: "greetings_english.html",
  table2: "hola",
  table2_name: "greetings_spanish.html",
  table3: "Bonjour",
  table3_name: "greetings_french.html"
};

objKeys.forEach(function(item) {
  console.log(table_object[item])

})

  • for ( var i = 0; i < objKeys.length; i ++ ) {} is supported in almost every browser and every version of that. – E730 Oct 25 '17 at 13:24

I think a better way to do it in this case is making your object like this:

var table = {
    "hello world": "greetings_english.html",
    "hola": "greetings_spanish.html",
    "bonjour": "greetings_french.html"
};

for( var i in table ) {
    console.log( i );
    console.log( table[ i ] );
}

Or you could create two arrays:

var greetings = [
    "hello world",
    "hola",
    "bonjour"
];
var names = [
    "greetings_english.html",
    "greetings_spanish.html",
    "greetings_french.html"
];

for( var i = 0; i < greetings.length; i ++ ) {
    console.log( greetings[ i ] );
    console.log( names[ i ] );
}

You can make a table using this method

But in any case of your question:

var table = {
    table1: "hello world",
    table1_name: "greetings_english.html",
    table2: "hola",
    table2_name: "greetings_spanish.html",
    table3: "bonjour",
    table3_name: "greetings_french.html"
};

// Now there are three methods

console.log( "--- Method 1 ---" );
Object.keys( table )
      .filter( function( key ) {
          return /^table(\d+)$/.test( key );
      } )
      .forEach( function( key ) {
          console.log( key );
          console.log( table[ key ] );
          console.log( table[ key + "_name" ] );
      } );
      
console.log( "--- Method 2 ---" );
for ( var i in table ) {
    if ( /^table(\d+)$/.test( i ) ) {
        console.log( i );
        console.log( table[ i ] );
        console.log( table[ i + "_name" ] );
    }
}
      
console.log( "--- Method 3 ---" );
var keys = [
    "table1",
    "table2",
    "table3"
];
for ( var i = 0; i < keys.length; i ++ ) {
    console.log( keys[ i ] );
    console.log( table[ keys[ i ] ] );
    console.log( table[ keys[ i ] + "_name" ] );
}

Method 2 would be the best.

You don't need fancy filters or regular expression to accomplish such a simple task! Ignore those misleading answers and start using the full power of JavaScript!
You should use the Object.defineProperty() method on your object and set to enumerable: false all the properties you don't want to iterate through. In this way you also decouple your naming convention from your logic. Let me show you:

// Defining iterable properties. This ones will be returned
// by Object.keys()

var table_object = {
  table1: "hello world",
  table2: "hola",
  table3: "Bonjour",
  // It works even if you declare them in advance
  // table1_name: "greetings_english.html",
  // table2_name: "greetings_spanish.html",
  // table3_name: "greetings_french.html",
};

// Declaring the not iterable properties. They can still be
// accessed, but they will not be iterated through

Object.defineProperty(table_object, "table1_name", {
  // delete the next line if you have already declared it
  value: "greetings_english.html", 
  enumerable: false
});

Object.defineProperty(table_object, "table2_name", {
  // delete the next line if you have already declared it
  value: "greetings_spanish.html",
  enumerable: false
});

Object.defineProperty(table_object, "table3_name", {
  // delete the next line if you have already declared it
  value: "greetings_french.html",
  enumerable: false
});

// Iterating through the object using for ... in, which iterates
// over the keys

for (var key in table_object) {
  console.log(table_object[key]);
}

The not enumerable properties can still be retrieved along with all the enumerable ones using Object.getOwnPropertyNames().
However, if you are planning to actually use this second method to iterate through all the properties when filtering is not needed anymore I've to give you some advice:

  • enumerable can be set back to true, so if it a one-time change I'd highly suggest to revert it.

  • If filtering is toogled back and forth more often than not, then you should check twice the structure of your object, since there may be more suitable options for your needs (such as arrays into the object).

  • I thought about that but it's much slower than filtering the keys. – E730 Oct 26 '17 at 8:18
  • Have you got any benchmark? – DoNotDownvote_JustUpvote Oct 26 '17 at 8:50
  • Also, if you really care about performance, why not using loops over filter function?. I'm not saying this is the fastest solution, of course, but I think that's the most semantically correct one and, most important thing, it's not that slow to freeze your browser ;P – DoNotDownvote_JustUpvote Oct 26 '17 at 9:31

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