6

I am making a script for choices about a product (colors etc), which works in every browser except for Internet Explorer (11) & Edge.

I put the choices of each parameter in a array and apply a function to them with the array.forEach() method.

Example for the color parameter:

var color_btns = document.querySelectorAll('#color > p');
color_btns.forEach(function(color) {
    color.onclick = function () {
        color_btns.forEach(function(element) {
            if (element.classList.contains('selected')) {
                element.classList.remove('selected');
            }
        });
        color.classList.add('selected');
        document.querySelector('#f_color').value = color.dataset.id;
    };
});

I get the following output in the console of both IE & Edge:

Object doesn't support property or method 'forEach'

After searching about the issue, I learnt that this function should be supported by IE 9 and newer. I tried to define the function by myself without success. When I log the function it is defined as a function (with "[native code]" inside).

I replaced every .forEach by a for and it's working pretty well,

  • but how can I make it work ?
  • Is there a specific usage of the forEach() for Internet Explorer & Edge ?

I thought it was Array.prototype.forEach and that recent versions of IE (and all versions of Edge) had it...?

  • 1
    color_btns is not an array but a NodeList - ".querySelectorAll(): Returns a list of the elements within the document (using depth-first pre-order traversal of the document's nodes) that match the specified group of selectors. The object returned is a NodeList." – Andreas Oct 25 '17 at 9:47
  • Oh right, it explains why it doesn't work, NodeList.foreach isn't supported in Internet Explorer ! Thanks @Andreas – AymDev Oct 25 '17 at 9:51
15

The return value of querySelectorAll isn't an array, it's a NodeList. That only recently got forEach (and compatibility with JavaScript's iteration protocol, letting you use them as the targets of for-of and spread notation).

You can polyfill forEach easily:

if (typeof NodeList !== "undefined" && NodeList.prototype && !NodeList.prototype.forEach) {
    // Yes, there's really no need for `Object.defineProperty` here
    NodeList.prototype.forEach = Array.prototype.forEach;
}

Direct assignment is fine in this case, because enumerable, configurable, and writable should all be true and it's a value property. (enumerable being true surprised me, but that's how it's defined natively on Chrome, Firefox, Edge, and Safari).


When NodeList got forEach, it also became iterable, meaning you could loop through the contents of a NodeList via for-of loops, and use a NodeList in other places where an iterable is expected (for instance, in spread notation in an array initializer).

In practice, a browser that has features that use iterability (like for-of loops) is also likely to already provide these features of NodeList, but to ensure that (perhaps you're transpiling and including a polyfill for Symbol), we'd need to do a second thing: Add a function to its Symbol.iterator property that creates an iterator:

if (typeof Symbol !== "undefined" && Symbol.iterator && typeof NodeList !== "undefined" && NodeList.prototype && !NodeList.prototype[Symbol.iterator]) {
    Object.defineProperty(NodeList.prototype, Symbol.iterator, {
        value: Array.prototype[Symbol.itereator],
        writable: true,
        configurable: true
    });
}

Doing both together:

if (typeof NodeList !== "undefined" && NodeList.prototype && !NodeList.prototype.forEach) {
    // Yes, there's really no need for `Object.defineProperty` here
    NodeList.prototype.forEach = Array.prototype.forEach;
    if (typeof Symbol !== "undefined" && Symbol.iterator && !NodeList.prototype[Symbol.iterator]) {
        Object.defineProperty(NodeList.prototype, Symbol.iterator, {
            value: Array.prototype[Symbol.itereator],
            writable: true,
            configurable: true
        });
    }
}

Here's a live example using both, try this on (for instance) IE11 (although it will only demonstrate forEach), on which NodeList doesn't have these features natively:

// Using only ES5 features so this runs on IE11
function log() {
    if (typeof console !== "undefined" && console.log) {
        console.log.apply(console, arguments);
    }
}
if (typeof NodeList !== "undefined" && NodeList.prototype) {
    // forEach
    if (!NodeList.prototype.forEach) {
        // Yes, there's really no need for `Object.defineProperty` here
        console.log("Added forEach");
        NodeList.prototype.forEach = Array.prototype.forEach;
    }
    // Iterability
    if (typeof Symbol !== "undefined" && Symbol.iterator && !NodeList.prototype[Symbol.iterator]) {
        console.log("Added Symbol.iterator");
        Object.defineProperty(NodeList.prototype, Symbol.iterator, {
            value: Array.prototype[Symbol.itereator],
            writable: true,
            configurable: true
        });
    }
}

log("Testing forEach");
document.querySelectorAll(".container div").forEach(function(div) {
    var html = div.innerHTML;
    div.innerHTML = html[0].toUpperCase() + html.substring(1).toLowerCase();
});

// Iterable
if (typeof Symbol !== "undefined" && Symbol.iterator) {
    // Using eval here to avoid causing syntax errors on IE11
    log("Testing iterability");
    eval(
        'for (const div of document.querySelectorAll(".container div")) { ' +
        '    div.style.color = "blue"; ' +
        '}'
    );
}
<div class="container">
  <div>one</div>
  <div>two</div>
  <div>three</div>
  <div>four</div>
</div>

The HTMLCollection returned by getElementsByTagName (and various other older APIs) isn't defined as iterable, but if you like, you can also do this for HTMLCollection as well. Here's a loop doing boty NodeList (if necessary) and HTMLCollection (if necessary):

for (const ctor of [typeof NodeList !== "undefined" && NodeList, typeof HTMLCollection !== "undefined" && HTMLCollection]) {
    if (ctor && ctor.prototype && !ctor.prototype.forEach) {
        // (Yes, there's really no need for `Object.defineProperty` here)
        ctor.prototype.forEach = Array.prototype.forEach;
        if (typeof Symbol !== "undefined" && Symbol.iterator && !ctor.prototype[Symbol.iterator]) {
            Object.defineProperty(ctor.prototype, Symbol.iterator, {
                value: Array.prototype[Symbol.itereator],
                writable: true,
                configurable: true
            });
        }
    }
}

Just beware that HTMLCollection is live, so changes you make to the DOM which affect what's in the collection get reflected in the collection immediately, which could result in surprising behavior. (NodeList is a disconnected collection, so that behavior doesn't happen.)

  • @wOxxOm - True. This was focussed on forEach, and in practice an environment that supports features that use iterability (like for-of) is likely to already provide iterability on NodeList, but I've added it above. Note that direct assignment doesn't replicate the native property descriptor, you need to use Object.defineProperty. – T.J. Crowder Sep 8 '18 at 9:11
5

OK, let's start from here, in JavaScript, we have some cases which we call it Array-like, means even it looks like an array, it's not a real array...

For example arguments in function or in your case Nodelist...

Even All modern browsers understand which you'de like to change it to Array and work well, in IE and some other browsers it's not supported using array functions on Nodelist for example...

So if you supporting broad range of browsers, it's better to convert them to an array before doing any activity on them...

There are few ways to convert Array-like values to real Array...

One widely used in ES5 is this structure:

Array.prototype.slice.call(YourNodeList);

So you can do:

var allDivs = document.querySelectorAll("div");
var allRealDivsArray = Array.prototype.slice.call(allDivs);

But if you using ES6, there are even neater ways to do it, just make sure you convert them to ES5 using babel for example as those old browsers which not supporting looping over array-like, won't support ES6 as well for sure...

Two very common ways to do them are:

1) Using Array.from

const allDivs = document.querySelectorAll("div");
const allRealDivsArray = Array.from(allDivs);

2) Using [...Array]

const allDivs = document.querySelectorAll("div");
const allRealDivsArray = [...allDivs];
1

While it may look like an array, it's actually a NodeList which doesn't have the same features as an array. Use a for loop instead

color_btns = document.querySelectorAll('#color > p'); 

for (var i = 0; i < color_btns.length; i++) {
    color_btns[i].onclick = function () { 
        for (var j = 0; j < color_btns.length; j++) {
            if(color_btns[j].classList.contains('selected')) { 
                color_btns[j].classList.remove('selected');
            }
        }
    color_btns[i].classList.add('selected'); 
    document.querySelector('#f_color').value = color_btns[i].dataset.id;
    };
}
  • I already use a for loop instead and yes it is still a good classic alternative. Thanks ! – AymDev Oct 25 '17 at 9:53
  • Pain, I know haha. Have a look at the answer from TJ Crowder for a polyfill to get it working anyway :) – jERCle Oct 25 '17 at 9:55
  • I did, thanks @jERCle :) By the way as @T.J.Crowder wrote you forgot to convert the 1st forEach hehe – AymDev Oct 25 '17 at 9:58
  • 1
    Yeap, I missed that one. Sorry! Was in the middle of getting the kids too bed – jERCle Oct 25 '17 at 10:21
  • I am, however, having a similar pain with IE11 at work regardless of the fact it should be available from IE9 up. Even as per Microsoft's docs docs.microsoft.com/en-us/scripting/javascript/reference/… – jERCle Oct 25 '17 at 10:28

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