3
int firstDuplicate(int[] a) {
    Set<Integer> result = new HashSet();
    for(int i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
        if(result.contains(a[i])) {
            return a[i];
        } else {
            result.add(a[i]);
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

The complexity of the above code is O(n2) because of contains check inside the for loop.

How to achieve this with a complexity of O(n) in java.

Implementation of .contains for ArrayList

public int indexOf(Object o) {
        if (o == null) {
            for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
                if (elementData[i]==null)
                    return i;
        } else {
            for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
                if (o.equals(elementData[i]))
                    return i;
        }
        return -1;
    }
  • 1
    are you sure the contains-check is O(n)? – luk2302 Oct 25 '17 at 13:59
  • 9
    contains() method for HashSet runs in O(1) . So your code is already O(n). – acnn Oct 25 '17 at 14:02
  • 1
    You have already been corrected by @acnn . Not every loop is O(n): for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) { return; } – luk2302 Oct 25 '17 at 14:04
  • 6
    You are checking the contains of ArrayList which is completely irrelevant here since the object you call contains on is a HashSet. – luk2302 Oct 25 '17 at 14:06
  • 1
    @acnn contains() for HashSet doesn't always run in O(1). It depends on the hash function and the data. In the worst case, it can run in O(n). – Malt Oct 25 '17 at 14:07
3

The implementation you're providing corresponds to the contains(Object) method in the ArrayList class. The method you're using is actually HashSet.contains(Object).

The complexity of HashSet.contains(Object) is O(1). To achieve this, it uses a hash of the value stored to find the element searched for.

In the unlikely event that two objects share the same hash, both elements will be stored under the same hash in a list. This might be the reason that is misleading you to believe that the cost for HashSet.contains(Object) is O(n). Although there is a list, elements are nearly evenly distributed, and thus the list size tends to 1, transforming O(n) to O(1).

2

As already explained in this answer your algorithm has already O(n) time complexity as HashSet’s lookup methods (includes both contains and add) have O(1) time complexity.

Still, you can improve your method, as there as no reason to perform two lookups for each element:

static int firstDuplicate(int[] a) {
    Set<Integer> result = new HashSet<>();
    for(int i: a) if(!result.add(i)) return i;
    return -1;
}

The contract of Set.add is to only add a value (and return true) if the value is not already contained in the set and return false if it is already contained in the set.

Using this you may end up with half the execution time (it’s still the same time complexity) and have simpler code…

-5
void printRepeating(int a[], int asize){
        int i;  
        System.out.println("The repeating elements are : ");    
        for (i = 0; i < asize; i++)
        {
            if (a[Math.abs(a[i])] >= 0){
                a[Math.abs(a[i])] = -a[Math.abs(a[i])];
            }
            else{
                System.out.print(Math.abs(a[i]) + " ");
                break;
            }
        }         
} 
  • How does it work? – Ole V.V. Oct 25 '17 at 14:51
  • this is a java function you have to make a call in your main function for example firstDuplicate({1,2,2,3,4}, 5) – Mike Oct 25 '17 at 15:04
  • 1
    I think he rather wanted to know how the method itself solves the issue. What is the trick? Can you explain or comment it? Just posting some lines of codes often isn't that helpful, especially for beginners. Instead post an explanation together with it. – Zabuza Oct 25 '17 at 15:18
  • 2
    This doesn’t look like Java code, but rather like C code, e.g. Java doesn’t need the array length as parameter and there’s no top level printf function. In C, it may also happen to work with buffer overflows staying unnoticed, e.g. if you call firstDuplicate({10, 1, 10 }, 3). Further, you forgot to place curly braces around the else block, indentation alone is not enough. Your code does break after the first element unconditionally (if not the first element already cause an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException)… – Holger Oct 25 '17 at 15:23
  • 3
    I’m far from convinced it works correctly. If the array contains 1 and -1, will it be reported a duplicate since your are taking abs()? If the array has length 5 and contains a 7, will it crash with an exception? – Ole V.V. Oct 25 '17 at 17:16

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