860

Is there a quick way to set an HTML text input (<input type=text />) to only allow numeric keystrokes (plus '.')?

  • 81
    Many solutions here only work when keys are pressed. These will fail if people paste text using the menu, or if they drag and drop text into the text input. I've been bitten by that before. Be careful! – Bennett McElwee Jan 24 '11 at 21:09
  • 83
    @JuliusA - you always always need server-side validation anyway. – Stephen P Nov 23 '11 at 1:57
  • 49
    <input type="text" onkeypress='return event.charCode >= 48 && event.charCode <= 57'></input> – Droogans Jan 20 '13 at 20:13
  • 14
    @Droogans notice that also disables any other key, like TAB to go to the next input or any other shortcut not directly involved with input like cmd+R for refreshing the website if the input is focused. – Alejandro Pérez Nov 5 '13 at 9:54
  • 1
    If you are okay with Plugin, use NumericInput. Demo: jsfiddle.net/152sumxu/2 More details here stackoverflow.com/a/27561763/82961 – Faiz Dec 19 '14 at 7:53

62 Answers 62

1142
1

Note: This is an updated answer. Comments below refer to an old version which messed around with keycodes.

JavaScript

Try it yourself on JSFiddle.

You can filter the input values of a text <input> with the following setInputFilter function (supports Copy+Paste, Drag+Drop, keyboard shortcuts, context menu operations, non-typeable keys, the caret position, different keyboard layouts, and all browsers since IE 9):

// Restricts input for the given textbox to the given inputFilter function.
function setInputFilter(textbox, inputFilter) {
  ["input", "keydown", "keyup", "mousedown", "mouseup", "select", "contextmenu", "drop"].forEach(function(event) {
    textbox.addEventListener(event, function() {
      if (inputFilter(this.value)) {
        this.oldValue = this.value;
        this.oldSelectionStart = this.selectionStart;
        this.oldSelectionEnd = this.selectionEnd;
      } else if (this.hasOwnProperty("oldValue")) {
        this.value = this.oldValue;
        this.setSelectionRange(this.oldSelectionStart, this.oldSelectionEnd);
      } else {
        this.value = "";
      }
    });
  });
}

You can now use the setInputFilter function to install an input filter:

setInputFilter(document.getElementById("myTextBox"), function(value) {
  return /^\d*\.?\d*$/.test(value); // Allow digits and '.' only, using a RegExp
});

See the JSFiddle demo for more input filter examples. Also note that you still must do server side validation!

TypeScript

Here is a TypeScript version of this.

function setInputFilter(textbox: Element, inputFilter: (value: string) => boolean): void {
    ["input", "keydown", "keyup", "mousedown", "mouseup", "select", "contextmenu", "drop"].forEach(function(event) {
        textbox.addEventListener(event, function(this: (HTMLInputElement | HTMLTextAreaElement) & {oldValue: string; oldSelectionStart: number | null, oldSelectionEnd: number | null}) {
            if (inputFilter(this.value)) {
                this.oldValue = this.value;
                this.oldSelectionStart = this.selectionStart;
                this.oldSelectionEnd = this.selectionEnd;
            } else if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(this, 'oldValue')) {
                this.value = this.oldValue;
                if (this.oldSelectionStart !== null &&
                    this.oldSelectionEnd !== null) {
                    this.setSelectionRange(this.oldSelectionStart, this.oldSelectionEnd);
                }
            } else {
                this.value = "";
            }
        });
    });
}

jQuery

There is also a jQuery version of this. See this answer.

HTML 5

HTML 5 has a native solution with <input type="number"> (see the specification), but note that browser support varies:

  • Most browsers will only validate the input when submitting the form, and not when typing.
  • Most mobile browsers don't support the step, min and max attributes.
  • Chrome (version 71.0.3578.98) still allows the user to enter the characters e and E into the field. Also see this question.
  • Firefox (version 64.0) and Edge (EdgeHTML version 17.17134) still allow the user to enter any text into the field.

Try it yourself on w3schools.com.

  • 4
    Although this would be a good choice, this still allows to enter characters like /, multiple dots, other operators etc. – Mahendra Liya Mar 12 '13 at 19:36
  • 6
    Still not supported by Firefox 21 (I don't even talk about IE9 or earlier version ...) – JBE May 24 '13 at 17:40
  • 70
    The input type number is not meant to be used to make your input only accept numbers. It's meant for inputs which specify a 'number of items'. Chrome for example adds two small arrows to increase of decrease the number by one. A proper numberic-only input is a kind of ridiculous omission to HTML. – Erwin Jun 28 '13 at 8:45
  • 10
    The type="number" does not actually prevent entering invalid text into the field; appears that you can even cut and paste garbage data into the field, even in chrome. – perfectionist Jun 13 '14 at 11:15
  • 6
    The only thing I would add to this is to change the Ctrl+A line to include MacOSX users: (e.keyCode == 65 && (e.ctrlKey === true || e.metaKey === true)) – MForMarlon Mar 17 '15 at 23:06
285
0

Use this DOM

<input type='text' onkeypress='validate(event)' />

And this script

function validate(evt) {
  var theEvent = evt || window.event;

  // Handle paste
  if (theEvent.type === 'paste') {
      key = event.clipboardData.getData('text/plain');
  } else {
  // Handle key press
      var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;
      key = String.fromCharCode(key);
  }
  var regex = /[0-9]|\./;
  if( !regex.test(key) ) {
    theEvent.returnValue = false;
    if(theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault();
  }
}
  • 12
    german-settings on an eeepc 900. some key's for good usabiliy do not work: - backspace (keyCode: 8) - navigation key left and right (keyCode: 37, 38) copy and paste is also possible... – Michael Piendl Sep 10 '09 at 18:24
  • 11
    Most people do care, having a script error show up reflects poorly on your site. – Robert Jeppesen Apr 26 '10 at 21:37
  • 14
    few problems with this code. You can enter . more than one time, second it does not allow delete key, any solution? – coure2011 May 16 '11 at 11:09
  • 4
    I cared about backspace, delete and arrows not working. If you remove "theEvent.keycode ||", and add: "if( /[ -~]/ && !regex.test(key) ) {" then it does work better (for ASCII/UTF anyway). But then it won't reject chinese characters! :) – Sam Watkins Jun 3 '11 at 7:44
  • 4
    this allow someone paste random stuff to the input – Vitim.us May 4 '12 at 16:39
137
0

I've searched long and hard for a good answer to this, and we desperately need <input type="number", but short of that, these 2 are the most concise ways I could come up with:

<input type="text" 
       onkeyup="this.value=this.value.replace(/[^\d]/,'')">

If you dislike the non-accepted character showing for a split-second before being erased, the method below is my solution. Note the numerous additional conditions, this is to avoid disabling all sorts of navigation and hotkeys. If anyone knows how to compactify this, let us know!

<input type="text" 
onkeydown="return ( event.ctrlKey || event.altKey 
                    || (47<event.keyCode && event.keyCode<58 && event.shiftKey==false) 
                    || (95<event.keyCode && event.keyCode<106)
                    || (event.keyCode==8) || (event.keyCode==9) 
                    || (event.keyCode>34 && event.keyCode<40) 
                    || (event.keyCode==46) )">
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    input type="number" is coming in HTML 5 - and you could use JavaScript as a fall-back polyfill... stevefenton.co.uk/Content/Blog/Date/201105/Blog/… – Fenton May 23 '11 at 23:06
  • 5
    Good method but can be broken by pressing and holding a non-acceptable key – Scott Brown Nov 16 '11 at 16:24
  • 8
    Change the regex to /[^\d+]/ and it works with holding down – boecko Apr 24 '12 at 17:01
  • 11
    @boecko thanks for this, but note that it should be /[^\d]+/ instead. Good solution though. Also @user235859 – Mosselman Jun 11 '12 at 21:49
  • 11
    He wanted to allow . too. You should actually make it /[^0-9.]/g – Qsario Aug 1 '12 at 7:20
100
2

Here is a simple one which allows for exactly one decimal, but no more:

<input type="text" oninput="this.value = this.value.replace(/[^0-9.]/g, '').replace(/(\..*)\./g, '$1');" />

| improve this answer | |
  • 14
    Handles: copy+paste, drag 'n drop, only allows 1 decimal, tab, delete, backspace - use this one – Mathemats Jan 16 '18 at 3:36
  • Can this logic inside oninput be extracted so that can be used globally? – ema Jan 29 '19 at 12:34
  • @ema - yes, see my other answer here which shows how you can apply the rule using class. – billynoah Jan 29 '19 at 14:33
  • if you use this on angular form the value wont update in form control value. – Ale_info Jul 16 '19 at 15:39
  • Awesome. I change the event to this.value = this.value.replace(/[^0-9.-]/g, '').replace(/(\..*)\./g, '$1').replace(/^0+/g, '').replace(/(?<!^)-/g, ''); This way it handles only a - at the beginning and doesn't allow 0's at the beginning of the number. – brenth Jul 17 '19 at 15:41
54
0

And one more example, which works great for me:

function validateNumber(event) {
    var key = window.event ? event.keyCode : event.which;
    if (event.keyCode === 8 || event.keyCode === 46) {
        return true;
    } else if ( key < 48 || key > 57 ) {
        return false;
    } else {
        return true;
    }
};

Also attach to keypress event

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('[id^=edit]').keypress(validateNumber);
});

And HTML:

<input type="input" id="edit1" value="0" size="5" maxlength="5" />

Here is a jsFiddle example

  • What about pasted text? – Jason Ebersey Jun 6 '13 at 12:34
  • Why do I get "event is undefined" when I call this function? – Vincent Mar 6 '14 at 19:25
  • 1
    this doesn't work on Firefox when the event.keyCode is always returned 0. I fixed with new code: function validateNumber(event) { var key = event.which || event.charCode || event.keyCode || 0; if (key == 8 || key == 46 || key == 37 || key == 39) { return true; } else if ( key < 48 || key > 57 ) { return false; } return true; }; – Luan Nguyen Nov 24 '15 at 22:41
  • 1
    As @Jessica said, you cam add apostrophe and even percentage sign. – Alejandro Nava Dec 13 '16 at 20:35
  • 1
    Very close! but does allow more than one decimal. – kross Aug 15 '17 at 22:30
52
0

HTML5 has <input type=number>, which sounds right for you. Currently, only Opera supports it natively, but there is a project that has a JavaScript implementation.

| improve this answer | |
  • Here's a document defining which browsers support this attribute: caniuse.com/input-number. As of the writing of this, Chrome and Safari both fully support this type field. IE 10 has partial support, and Firefox has no support. – Nathan Wallace Jul 25 '13 at 14:05
  • The only problem with type=number is that is not supported by IE9 – J Rod Jun 6 '16 at 2:32
  • @JRod There's a polyfill for old IE. More info here. – jkdev Jul 7 '16 at 8:40
  • 7
    First problem is type=number is allowing the e char because it consider e+10 as number. Second problem is that you can not limit the maximum number of chars in the input. – Hakan Fıstık Oct 26 '17 at 15:30
  • Another problem is that if the type is number then I can't get the benefits of setting the type to, for example: "tel". – ScottyBlades Feb 15 at 17:07
51
0

Most answers here all have the weakness of using key- events.

Many of the answers would limit your ability to do text selection with keyboard macros, copy+paste and more unwanted behavior, others seem to depend on specific jQuery plugins, which is killing flies with machineguns.

This simple solution seems to work best for me cross platform, regardless of input mechanism (keystroke, copy+paste, rightclick copy+paste, speech-to-text etc.). All text selection keyboard macros would still work, and it would even limit ones ability to set a non-numeric value by script.

function forceNumeric(){
    var $input = $(this);
    $input.val($input.val().replace(/[^\d]+/g,''));
}
$('body').on('propertychange input', 'input[type="number"]', forceNumeric);
  • jQuery 1.7+ needed. This is a more complete answer since it takes in account inputs via "copy". And it is also simpler! – Memochipan Jun 29 '15 at 15:30
  • An alternative regex: replace(/[^\d]+/g,'') Replace all non-digits with empty string. The "i" (case insensitive) modifier is not needed. – Memochipan Jun 29 '15 at 16:20
  • This should be on top, since "onkey" event handlers in a tag should not be propagated any more... – gpinkas Oct 13 '15 at 12:12
  • This one is definitely the best answer here but it doesn't allow digits with decimal numbers. Any idea how that could work? – Atirag Sep 4 '16 at 13:05
  • 7
    @Atirag If you want decimals you can change the regex /[^\d,.]+/ – EJTH Sep 5 '16 at 9:12
41
0

I opted to use a combination of the two answers mentioned here i.e.

<input type="number" />

and

function isNumberKey(evt){
    var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode
    return !(charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57));
}

<input type="text" onkeypress="return isNumberKey(event);">

  • Excellent answer... +1. You can also reduce the if statement to: return !(charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57)); – schadeck Apr 2 '13 at 21:12
  • 7
    How about deleting though? You want numbers but you probably want people to be able to correct them without refreshing the page... – Martin Erlic Feb 3 '16 at 1:27
39
0

HTML5 supports regexes, so you could use this:

<input id="numbersOnly" pattern="[0-9.]+" type="text">

Warning: Some browsers don't support this yet.

| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    HTML5 also has <input type=number>. – Mathias Bynens Oct 18 '11 at 9:30
  • True. You should make this an answer. Ooops, @Ms2ger already has. – james.garriss Dec 1 '11 at 15:59
  • The <input type=number> adds arrows for increasing and decreasing in certain browsers so this seems like a good solution when we want to avoid the spinner – Ayrad May 7 '13 at 17:06
  • 38
    Pattern only gets checked on submit. You can still enter letters. – Erwin Jun 28 '13 at 9:01
  • What does the + means in pattern attribute? – PlanetHackers Nov 20 '15 at 7:29
18
0

JavaScript

function validateNumber(evt) {
    var e = evt || window.event;
    var key = e.keyCode || e.which;

    if (!e.shiftKey && !e.altKey && !e.ctrlKey &&
    // numbers   
    key >= 48 && key <= 57 ||
    // Numeric keypad
    key >= 96 && key <= 105 ||
    // Backspace and Tab and Enter
    key == 8 || key == 9 || key == 13 ||
    // Home and End
    key == 35 || key == 36 ||
    // left and right arrows
    key == 37 || key == 39 ||
    // Del and Ins
    key == 46 || key == 45) {
        // input is VALID
    }
    else {
        // input is INVALID
        e.returnValue = false;
        if (e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault();
    }
}

additional you could add comma, period and minus (,.-)

  // comma, period and minus, . on keypad
  key == 190 || key == 188 || key == 109 || key == 110 ||

HTML

<input type="text" onkeydown="validateNumber(event);"/ >
  • Does not function correctly on keyboards where one has to use the shift key to enter a number (e.g. European AZERTY keyboard). – Captain Sensible May 17 '13 at 7:43
  • thanks man, you really understand a question! Nice example and off course handling . or , (which most people do want if they work with numbers) – real_yggdrasil Jan 12 '15 at 9:15
  • This is the only one that works that prevent pasting non numeric values. – DEREK LEE Jan 11 '16 at 15:18
16
0

So simple....

// In a JavaScript function (can use HTML or PHP).

function isNumberKey(evt){
    var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode;
    if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57))
        return false;
    return true;
}

In your form input:

<input type=text name=form_number size=20 maxlength=12 onkeypress='return isNumberKey(event)'>

With input max. (These above allows for a 12-digit number)

  • Don't do that ! This blocks everything, numpad, arrow keys, Delete key, shortcuts (CTRL + A, CTRL + R for example), even the TAB key it's REALY anoying ! – Korri Feb 22 '13 at 21:56
  • @Korri I dont follow, what seems to be the problme? It did work fine in my case. – uneakharsh Mar 28 '13 at 12:21
  • first line must changed to : var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode; – peiman F. Jul 17 '14 at 22:35
15
0

2 solutions:

Use a form validator (for example with jQuery validation plugin)

Do a check during the onblur (i.e. when the user leaves the field) event of the input field, with the regular expression:

<script type="text/javascript">
function testField(field) {
    var regExpr = new RegExp("^\d*\.?\d*$");
    if (!regExpr.test(field.value)) {
      // Case of error
      field.value = "";
    }
}

</script>

<input type="text" ... onblur="testField(this);"/>
  • Interestingly, I had to give the regex is "^\\d\\.?\\d*$", but that might be because the page is run through an XSLT transform. – Paul Tomblin Apr 22 '10 at 15:04
  • I think the regular expression is incorrect. I used this line: var regExpr = /^\d+(\.\d*)?$/; – costa Jan 10 '17 at 23:07
  • @costa not sure, if the user wants to input .123 (instead of 0.123) for example? – Romain Linsolas Jan 16 '17 at 8:20
  • @romaintaz. You are right, but then you'd have to change the regular expression to make sure that in case there is no digit in front of the dot there are digits after the dot. Something like this: var regExpr = /^\d+(\.\d*)?$|^\.\d+$/;. – costa Jan 16 '17 at 19:09
14
0

A safer approach is checking the value of the input, instead of hijacking keypresses and trying to filter keyCodes.

This way the user is free to use keyboard arrows, modifier keys, backspace, delete, use non standard keyboars, use mouse to paste, use drag and drop text, even use accessibility inputs.

The below script allows positive and negative numbers

1
10
100.0
100.01
-1
-1.0
-10.00
1.0.0 //not allowed

var input = document.getElementById('number');
input.onkeyup = input.onchange = enforceFloat;

//enforce that only a float can be inputed
function enforceFloat() {
  var valid = /^\-?\d+\.\d*$|^\-?[\d]*$/;
  var number = /\-\d+\.\d*|\-[\d]*|[\d]+\.[\d]*|[\d]+/;
  if (!valid.test(this.value)) {
    var n = this.value.match(number);
    this.value = n ? n[0] : '';
  }
}
<input id="number" value="-3.1415" placeholder="Type a number" autofocus>

EDIT: I removed my old answer because I think it is antiquated now.

13
0

You can use pattern for this:

<input id="numbers" pattern="[0-9.]+" type="number">

Here you can see the complete mobile website interface tips.

13
0

Please find below mentioned solution. In this user can be able to enter only numeric value, Also user can not be able to copy, paste, drag and drop in input.

Allowed Characters

0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9

Not allowed Characters and Characters through events

  • Alphabetic value
  • Special characters
  • Copy
  • Paste
  • Drag
  • Drop

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('#number').bind("cut copy paste drag drop", function(e) {
      e.preventDefault();
  });     
});
function isNumberKey(evt) {
    var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode;
    if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57))
        return false;
    return true;
}
<link href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet"/>
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<input type="text" class="form-control" name="number" id="number" onkeypress="return isNumberKey(event)" placeholder="Enter Numeric value only">

Let me know if it not works.

| improve this answer | |
11
0

If you want to suggest to the device (maybe a mobile phone) between alpha or numeric you can use <input type="number">.

11
0

One more example where you can add only numbers in the input field, can not letters

<input type="text" class="form-control" id="phone" name="phone" placeholder="PHONE" spellcheck="false" oninput="this.value = this.value.replace(/[^0-9.]/g, '').replace(/(\..*)\./g, '$1');">
| improve this answer | |
10
0

A short and sweet implementation using jQuery and replace() instead of looking at event.keyCode or event.which:

$('input.numeric').live('keyup', function(e) {
  $(this).val($(this).val().replace(/[^0-9]/g, ''));
});

Only small side effect that the typed letter appears momentarily and CTRL/CMD + A seems to behave a bit strange.

| improve this answer | |
9
0

input type="number" is an HTML5 attribute.

In the other case this will help you:

function isNumberKey(evt){
    var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode
    if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57))
        return false;
    return true;
}

<input type="number" name="somecode" onkeypress="return isNumberKey(event)"/>
  • first line must changed to : var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode; – peiman F. Jul 17 '14 at 22:35
9
0

JavaScript code:

function validate(evt)
{
    if(evt.keyCode!=8)
    {
        var theEvent = evt || window.event;
        var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;
        key = String.fromCharCode(key);
        var regex = /[0-9]|\./;
        if (!regex.test(key))
        {
            theEvent.returnValue = false;

            if (theEvent.preventDefault)
                theEvent.preventDefault();
            }
        }
    }

HTML code:

<input type='text' name='price' value='0' onkeypress='validate(event)'/>

works perfectly because the backspace keycode is 8 and a regex expression doesn't let it, so it's an easy way to bypass the bug :)

9
0

A easy way to resolve this problem is implementing a jQuery function to validate with regex the charaters typed in the textbox for example:

Your html code:

<input class="integerInput" type="text">

And the js function using jQuery

$(function() {
    $('.integerInput').on('input', function() {
      this.value = this.value
        .replace(/[^\d]/g, '');// numbers and decimals only

    });
});

$(function() {
        $('.integerInput').on('input', function() {
          this.value = this.value
            .replace(/[^\d]/g, '');// numbers and decimals only
            
        });
    });
<script
			  src="https://code.jquery.com/jquery-2.2.4.min.js"
			  integrity="sha256-BbhdlvQf/xTY9gja0Dq3HiwQF8LaCRTXxZKRutelT44="
			  crossorigin="anonymous">
</script>

<input type="text" class="integerInput"/>


		

8
0

Just an other variant with jQuery using

$(".numeric").keypress(function() {
    return (/\d/.test(String.fromCharCode(event.which) ))
});
8
0

just use type="number" now this attribute supporting in most of the browsers

<input type="number" maxlength="3" ng-bind="first">
| improve this answer | |
  • I haven't check data is --1 (2 minus characters before 1). – Ngoc Nam Oct 31 '18 at 11:20
6
0

You can also compare input value (which is treated as string by default) to itself forced as numeric, like:

if(event.target.value == event.target.value * 1) {
    // returns true if input value is numeric string
}

However, you need to bind that to event like keyup etc.

| improve this answer | |
6
0
<input name="amount" type="text" value="Only number in here"/> 

<script>
    $('input[name=amount]').keyup(function(){
        $(this).val($(this).val().replace(/[^\d]/,''));
    });
</script>
| improve this answer | |
6
0

I saw some great answers however I like them as small and as simple as possible, so maybe someone will benefit from it. I would use javascript Number() and isNaN functionality like this:

if(isNaN(Number(str))) {
   // ... Exception it is NOT a number
} else {
   // ... Do something you have a number
}

Hope this helps.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I love this! Such an elegant solution, no regex involved. – Levi Roberts Jun 26 '19 at 2:22
  • This is not an answer to the question, OP asked to only allow text on a input, not verify afterwards. – Timberman Jan 20 at 15:03
  • Yes, that is truth! But there is already an accepted answer which I think is good, but I thought this might help somebody, plus it's nice and clean. – Sicha Jan 24 at 9:25
5
0

Use this DOM:

<input type = "text" onkeydown = "validate(event)"/>

And this script:

validate = function(evt)
{
    if ([8, 46, 37, 39, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 35, 36].indexOf(evt.keyCode || evt.which) == -1)
    {
        evt.returnValue = false;
        if(evt.preventDefault){evt.preventDefault();}
    }
}

...OR this script, without indexOf, using two for's...

validate = function(evt)
{
    var CharValidate = new Array("08", "046", "039", "948", "235");
    var number_pressed = false;
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        for (Ncount = 0; Ncount < parseInt(CharValidate[i].substring(0, 1)) + 1; Ncount++)
        {
            if ((evt.keyCode || evt.which) == parseInt(CharValidate[i].substring(1, CharValidate[i].lenght)) + Ncount)
            {
                number_pressed = true;
            }
        }
    }
    if (number_pressed == false)
    {
        evt.returnValue = false;
        if(evt.preventDefault){evt.preventDefault();}
    }
}

I used the onkeydown attribute instead of onkeypress, because the onkeydown attribute is checked before onkeypress attribute. The problem would be in the Google Chrome browser.

With the attribute "onkeypress", TAB would be uncontrollable with "preventDefault" on google chrome, however, with the attribute "onkeydown", TAB becomes controllable!

ASCII Code for TAB => 9

The first script have less code than the second, however, the array of ASCII characters must have all the keys.

The second script is much bigger than the first, but the array does not need all keys. The first digit in each position of the array is the number of times each position will be read. For each reading, will be incremented 1 to the next one. For example:




NCount = 0

48 + NCount = 48

NCount + +

48 + NCount = 49

NCount + +

...

48 + NCount = 57




In the case of numerical keys are only 10 (0 - 9), but if they were 1 million it would not make sense to create an array with all these keys.

ASCII codes:

  • 8 ==> (Backspace);
  • 46 => (Delete);
  • 37 => (left arrow);
  • 39 => (right arrow);
  • 48 - 57 => (numbers);
  • 36 => (home);
  • 35 => (end);
5
0

This is an improved function:

function validateNumber(evt) {
  var theEvent = evt || window.event;
  var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;
  if ((key < 48 || key > 57) && !(key == 8 || key == 9 || key == 13 || key == 37 || key == 39 || key == 46) ){
    theEvent.returnValue = false;
    if (theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault();
  }
}
4
0

The best way (allow ALL type of numbers - real negative, real positive, iinteger negative, integer positive) is:

$(input).keypress(function (evt){
    var theEvent = evt || window.event;
    var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;
    key = String.fromCharCode( key );
    var regex = /[-\d\.]/; // dowolna liczba (+- ,.) :)
    var objRegex = /^-?\d*[\.]?\d*$/;
    var val = $(evt.target).val();
    if(!regex.test(key) || !objRegex.test(val+key) || 
            !theEvent.keyCode == 46 || !theEvent.keyCode == 8) {
        theEvent.returnValue = false;
        if(theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault();
    };
}); 
| improve this answer | |
4
0

This is the extended version of geowa4's solution. Supports min and max attributes. If the number is out of range, the previous value will be shown.

You can test it here.

Usage: <input type=text class='number' maxlength=3 min=1 max=500>

function number(e) {
var theEvent = e || window.event;
var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;
if(key!=13&&key!=9){//allow enter and tab
  key = String.fromCharCode( key );
  var regex = /[0-9]|\./;
  if( !regex.test(key)) {
    theEvent.returnValue = false;
    if(theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault();
    }   
  }
}

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("input[type=text]").filter(".number,.NUMBER").on({
        "focus":function(e){
         $(e.target).data('oldValue',$(e.target).val());
            },
        "keypress":function(e){
                e.target.oldvalue = e.target.value;
                number(e);
            },
        "change":function(e){
            var t = e.target;
            var min = $(t).attr("min");
            var max = $(t).attr("max");
            var val = parseInt($(t).val(),10);          
            if( val<min || max<val)
                {
                    alert("Error!");
                    $(t).val($(t).data('oldValue'));
                }

            }       
    });     
});

If the inputs are dynamic use this:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("body").on("focus","input[type=text].number,.NUMBER",function(e){
        $(e.target).data('oldValue',$(e.target).val());
    }); 
    $("body").on("keypress","input[type=text].number,.NUMBER",function(e){
        e.target.oldvalue = e.target.value;
        number(e);
    }); 
    $("body").on("change","input[type=text].number,.NUMBER",function(e){
        var t = e.target
        var min = $(t).attr("min");
        var max = $(t).attr("max");
        var val = parseInt($(t).val());         
        if( val<min || max<val)
            {
                alert("Error!");
                $(t).val($(t).data('oldValue'));
            }
    }); 
});
  • @UserB this should not delete anything. – user669677 Jul 19 '12 at 11:14

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