Can someone explain a "tracking branch" as it applies to git?

Here's the definition from git-scm.com:

A 'tracking branch' in Git is a local branch that is connected to a remote branch. When you push and pull on that branch, it automatically pushes and pulls to the remote branch that it is connected with.

Use this if you always pull from the same upstream branch into the new branch, and if you don't want to use "git pull" explicitly.

Unfortunately, being new to git and coming from SVN, that definition makes absolutely no sense to me.

I'm reading through "The Pragmatic Guide to Git" (great book, by the way), and they seem to suggest that tracking branches are a good thing and that after creating your first remote (origin, in this case), you should set up your master branch to be a tracking branch, but it unfortunately doesn't cover why a tracking branch is a good thing or what benefits you get by setting up your master branch to be a tracking branch of your origin repository.

Can someone please enlighten me (in English)?

up vote 74 down vote accepted

The ProGit book has a very good explanation:

Tracking Branches

Checking out a local branch from a remote branch automatically creates what is called a tracking branch. Tracking branches are local branches that have a direct relationship to a remote branch. If you’re on a tracking branch and type git push, Git automatically knows which server and branch to push to. Also, running git pull while on one of these branches fetches all the remote references and then automatically merges in the corresponding remote branch.

When you clone a repository, it generally automatically creates a master branch that tracks origin/master. That’s why git push and git pull work out of the box with no other arguments. However, you can set up other tracking branches if you wish — ones that don’t track branches on origin and don’t track the master branch. The simple case is the example you just saw, running git checkout -b [branch] [remotename]/[branch]. If you have Git version 1.6.2 or later, you can also use the --track shorthand:

$ git checkout --track origin/serverfix
Branch serverfix set up to track remote branch refs/remotes/origin/serverfix.
Switched to a new branch "serverfix"

To set up a local branch with a different name than the remote branch, you can easily use the first version with a different local branch name:

$ git checkout -b sf origin/serverfix
Branch sf set up to track remote branch refs/remotes/origin/serverfix.
Switched to a new branch "sf"

Now, your local branch sf will automatically push to and pull from origin/serverfix.

  • 13
    Just wanted to clear up this: "Checking out a local branch from a remote branch automatically creates what is called a tracking branch." That is misleading. Without the --track option any branch you create will not be tracking. – JohnO Jan 14 '11 at 18:04
  • @JohnO, might want to take that up with the Pro Git guy. The whole book is a result of massive editing collaboration IIRC. – Assaf Lavie Jan 14 '11 at 20:03

The Progit book mentions:

Tracking branches are local branches that have a direct relationship to a remote branch

Not exactly. the SO question "Having a hard time understanding git-fetch" includes:

There's no such concept of local tracking branches, only remote tracking branches.
So origin/master is a remote tracking branch for master in the origin repo.

But actually, once you establish an upstream branch relationship between:

  • a local branch like master
  • and a remote tracking branch like origin/master

Then you can consider master as a local tracking branch: it tracks the remote tracking branch origin/master which, in turns track the master branch of the upstream repo origin.

alt text

  • Image clarification: My Computer is 2 commits ahead of origin. That's where those two commits off of master come from. Image: progit.org/book/ch3-5.html – idbrii Mar 1 '11 at 18:59
  • Am I interpreting correctly: If I locally have remotes set for origin and upstream , then my local master branch will track origin directly, and upstream indirectly? eg: when I git status I'll receive a commit tracking message with respect both origin and upstream repos? (Settup: I cloned someone's repo locally, pushed my clone to a new repo on my GitHub account, and locally set origin and upstream remotes to my github repo and the cloned cloned repo respectively). – SherylHohman May 30 '17 at 17:29
  • 3
    @SherylHohman No: a local branch won't track anything "directly" or "indirectly". It will track the remote tracking branch you will assign to it. In case of a fork, the best practice is to track upstream (the original repo) for common branches (like master), and track origin (your remote fork) for new branches (your PR or feature branches): see stackoverflow.com/a/21847690/6309 – VonC May 30 '17 at 18:06
  • 1
    @VonC - The statement "There's no such concept of local tracking branches, only remote tracking branches." is interesting b/c there's such conflicting terminology around branches. This often referenced link web.archive.org/web/20130419172453/http://www.gitguys.com/… distinguishes between "tracking branches" & "remote tracking branches". They call origin/master a "remote tracking branch" - I agree - but then they call "master" a "tracking branch" too. What is master tracking? Are they wrong or is it a terminology problem? – Howiecamp Dec 4 '17 at 22:24
  • 2
    @Howiecamp what they call a "tracking branch called master" is simply a local branch master with an associated remote tracking branch origin/master, here to memorized the last SHA1 fetched from origin regarding its remote master branch. So it is a "shortcut" for designating "a local branch with an upstream branch" – VonC Dec 4 '17 at 22:43

Below are my personal learning notes on GIT tracking branches, hopefully it will be helpful for future visitors:

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Tracking branches and "git fetch":

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  • Interesting notes. +1 – VonC Apr 10 at 15:52
  • @VonC Thank you for your words of motivation. – hagrawal Apr 10 at 16:01

This was how I added a tracking branch so I can pull from it into my new branch:

git branch --set-upstream-to origin/Development new-branch

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