I've been through itertools inside and out and I cannot figure out how to do the following. I want to take a list.

x = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] and I want to get a new list:

y = [[1],[1,2],[1,2,3],.......[2],[2,3],[2,3,4].....[8]]

I need a list of all slices, but not combinations or permutations.

x = list(zip(x[::2], x[1::2])) is close, but doesn't do exactly what I'm hoping

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Use combinations not of x, but of the range of possible slice indices (including one past the end, thus len(x)+1, since slices are exclusive on the end) to make the slice end points, then use them to slice x:

from itertools import combinations

y = [x[s:e] for s, e in combinations(range(len(x)+1), 2)]

That gets exactly what you're going for as straightforwardly as possible. If you want (possibly) faster map based code, you can rephrase it as (list wrapper unnecessary on Python 2):

from itertools import combinations, starmap

y = list(map(x.__getitem__, starmap(slice, combinations(range(len(x)+1), 2))))

which gets the same result, but without any Python bytecode execution per-item, which might run faster (implementation dependent).

  • 1
    BTW, at least on my CPython 3.5 install, the listcomp is faster (only 2%ish) for the example input (length 8 list), but scales slightly worse as the input grows (for a length 100 list, it's ~5% slower than the "push to C" map based solution). That said, the listcomp is much more readable to my mind, so I'd prefer it in general. I leave the other one there just as an alternate example for fun. – ShadowRanger Oct 25 '17 at 21:11
  • Does this include slices where the start is greater than or equal to the end? – jpmc26 Oct 26 '17 at 2:16
  • @jpmc26: No, because that would produce a bunch of empty lists in the output. combinations returns lexicographically ordered combinations (without replacement) of the input, so it produces 0 with 1 through len(x) (inclusive, thanks to +1), then 1 with 2 through len(x), etc. Unlike nested loops over ranges, it doesn't have to create a bunch of range objects (in the inner loop) with varying bounds to do it either, which saves more Python level work and avoids temporaries (the two-tuples it's returning are cached and reused, so they effectively cost nothing). – ShadowRanger Oct 26 '17 at 2:32
  • Okay. I understand. Was confusing permutations and combinations. ;) But your explanation isn't quite on target, I don't think. The only reason they're sorted is because range's output is. Try, for example, using combinations(sorted(range(8+1), reverse=True), 2). Then all the tuples will start with the larger value. combinations seems to go by the input's order, so this depends on that detail of range. – jpmc26 Oct 26 '17 at 3:03
  • @jpmc26: The terminology is confusing (two orderings are involved, order of tuples and order within tuples), but to be clear: The tuples are emitted in lexicographic ordering, but they themselves are only internally in sorted order if the input was as well. Per the docs: "Combinations are emitted in lexicographic sort order. So, if the input iterable is sorted, the combination tuples will be produced in sorted order." So yes, range being in order is important, but that's a property of standard ranges I didn't feel required explanation. – ShadowRanger Oct 26 '17 at 3:13

You can utilize list comprehension if you insist on a one-liner:

> x=[1,2,3,4]
> [x[a:b+1] for a in range(len(x)) for b in range(len(x)) if a<=b]

[[1], [1, 2], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3, 4], [2], [2, 3], [2, 3, 4], [3], [3, 4], [4]]

Or you can even get rid of that if:

> [x[a:b+1] for a in range(len(x)) for b in range(a, len(x))]

You can try this:

x = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
y = [x[b:i+1] for b in range(len(x)) for i in range(len(x))]
final_list = list(filter(lambda x:x, y))

Output:

[[1], [1, 2], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3, 4], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [2], [2, 3], [2, 3, 4], [2, 3, 4, 5], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [3], [3, 4], [3, 4, 5], [3, 4, 5, 6], [3, 4, 5, 6, 7], [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [4], [4, 5], [4, 5, 6], [4, 5, 6, 7], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [5], [5, 6], [5, 6, 7], [5, 6, 7, 8], [6], [6, 7], [6, 7, 8], [7], [7, 8], [8]]
  • That's not valid code; your fors are backwards (you use i before it exists). Even flipping them, it doesn't produce the output you claim. – ShadowRanger Oct 25 '17 at 20:37
  • Try it again, but run del i before you do. Trust me, it's wrong. You can't use i to make a range before you've defined i, and you're accidentally relying on a previous definition of i here. Also, side-note: filter(lambda x: x, ...) is a (much) slower way to write filter(None, ...); filter is documented to use the identity test when the predicate is None. – ShadowRanger Oct 25 '17 at 20:39
  • @ShadowRanger my apologies, there was an i variable defined 100 lines above in my terminal! Please see my recent edit. It works now. – Ajax1234 Oct 25 '17 at 20:42
  • @Ajax1234. Your output does not match what the OP is looking for. – ekhumoro Oct 25 '17 at 20:46
  • 1
    @ShadowRanger. I don't think that's completely fair, given that itertools.combinations was only added in python-2.6. Anyway, I think his answer is worth an upvote, even if it doesn't give the most efficient solution possible. It certainly seems to offer the most readable solution. – ekhumoro Oct 25 '17 at 21:30

I think this is a good aproach, an iterative way, I could understand it well:

lst = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]

res = []
ln= len(lst)


for n in range(ln):
  for ind in range(n+1, ln+1):
    res.append(lst[n:ind])
  • 1
    You can limit the loops and avoid the empty test by changing the ranges to range(len(lst)) (outer range) since the start index should always be between 0 and len(lst) - 1, and range(n+1, len(lst)+1) (inner range) since the end must always be at least one larger than the start and must stop just past the end of the list to slice to the end. Then you don't need the if test at all. – ShadowRanger Oct 25 '17 at 20:56
  • @ShadowRanger aaaaaah, I see now! thanks, I was just editing when you finish the edit, thanks so much, I tryed here repl.it/NO6k/0 – Damian Lattenero Oct 25 '17 at 21:04

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