2

I have a array of bytes.

bytes[] = [43, 0, 0, -13, 114, -75, -2, 2, 20, 0, 0]

I want to convert it to unsigned bytes in Java. this is what I did: created a new array and copy the values with & 0xFF:

    this.bytes = new byte[bytes.length];
    for (int i=0;i<bytes.length;i++)
        this.bytes[i] = (byte) (bytes[i] & 0xFF);

but the values stay negative in the new array as well. what am I doing wrong?

  • 7
    There is no unsigned bytes in Java. – Sweeper Oct 26 '17 at 8:53
  • What do you expect an operation like byteValue & 0xFF to do? – f1sh Oct 26 '17 at 8:56
  • 2
    @f1sh It does the right thing in terms of converting a signed byte into an unsiged int. If you just cast a byte with a negative value e.g. into an int you end up with an int with that negative number. So that part of the code wasn't the problem, just the one where it's put back (i.e. casted again) into a byte ending up with the same negative value you started with. – Lothar Oct 26 '17 at 9:09
4

bytes in Java are always signed.

If you want to obtained the unsigned value of these bytes, you can store them in an int array:

byte[] signed = {43, 0, 0, -13, 114, -75, -2, 2, 20, 0, 0};
int[] unsigned = new int[signed.length];
for (int i = 0; i < signed.length; i++) {
    unsigned[i] = signed[i] & 0xFF;
}

You'll get the following values:

[43, 0, 0, 243, 114, 181, 254, 2, 20, 0, 0]
  • I understand. thanks! in python there is, that's why got mistaken.. – Ohad Oct 26 '17 at 8:55
1

Java has no thing called an unsigned byte. You have to use other types like short or int to be able to hold values > 127.

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