4

i am currently trying to end a while loop with something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() 
{
    while(getchar() != EOF)
    {
        if( getchar() == EOF )
            break;
    }
    return 0;

}

When i press CTRL+D on my Ubuntu, it ends the loop immediately. But on Windows i have to press CTRL+Z and then press ENTER to close the loop. Can i get rid of the ENTER on Windows?

  • Did you press CTRL+Z directly after starting a new line with ENTER? – Ctx Oct 26 '17 at 9:31
  • yes i did it directly after starting a new line – Michael Hübler Oct 26 '17 at 9:33
  • Your loop has 1 too many calls to getchar() - you just want one and assign the value it returns to a variable so you can use it inside the loop – Chris Turner Oct 26 '17 at 9:33
7

The getchar behavior

For linux the EOF char is written with ctrl + d, while on Windows it is written by the console when you press enter after changing an internal status of the CRT library through ctrl + z (this behaviour is kept for retrocompatibility with very old systems). If I'm not wrong it is called soft end of file. I don't think you can bypass it, since the EOF char is actually consumed by your getchar when you press enter, not when you press ctrl + z.

As reported here:

In Microsoft's DOS and Windows (and in CP/M and many DEC operating systems), reading from the terminal will never produce an EOF. Instead, programs recognize that the source is a terminal (or other "character device") and interpret a given reserved character or sequence as an end-of-file indicator; most commonly this is an ASCII Control-Z, code 26. Some MS-DOS programs, including parts of the Microsoft MS-DOS shell (COMMAND.COM) and operating-system utility programs (such as EDLIN), treat a Control-Z in a text file as marking the end of meaningful data, and/or append a Control-Z to the end when writing a text file. This was done for two reasons:

  • Backward compatibility with CP/M. The CP/M file system only recorded the lengths of files in multiples of 128-byte "records", so by convention a Control-Z character was used to mark the end of meaningful data if it ended in the middle of a record. The MS-DOS filesystem has always recorded the exact byte-length of files, so this was never necessary on MS-DOS.

  • It allows programs to use the same code to read input from both a terminal and a text file.

Other information are also reported here:

Some modern text file formats (e.g. CSV-1203[6]) still recommend a trailing EOF character to be appended as the last character in the file. However, typing Control+Z does not embed an EOF character into a file in either MS-DOS or Microsoft Windows, nor do the APIs of those systems use the character to denote the actual end of a file.

Some programming languages (e.g. Visual Basic) will not read past a "soft" EOF when using the built-in text file reading primitives (INPUT, LINE INPUT etc.), and alternate methods must be adopted, e.g. opening the file in binary mode or using the File System Object to progress beyond it.

Character 26 was used to mark "End of file" even if the ASCII calls it Substitute, and has other characters for this.

If you modify your code like that:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  while(1) {
    char c = getchar();
    printf("%d\n", c); 
    if (c == EOF)      // tried with also -1 and 26
      break;
  }
  return 0;
}

and you test it, on Windows you will see that the EOF (-1) it is not written in console until you press enter. Beore of that a ^Z is printed by the terminal emulator (I suspect). From my test, this behavior is repeated if:

  • you compile using the Microsoft Compiler
  • you compile using GCC
  • you run the compiled code in CMD window
  • you run the compiled code in bash emulator in windows

Update using Windows Console API

Following the suggestion of @eryksun, I successfully written a (ridiculously complex for what it can do) code for Windows that changes the behavior of conhost to actually get the "exit when pressing ctrl + d". It does not handle everything, it is only an example. IMHO, this is something to avoid as much as possible, since the portability is less than 0. Also, to actually handle correctly other input cases a lot more code should be written, since this stuff detaches the stdin from the console and you have to handle it by yourself.

The methods works more or less as follows:

  • get the current handler for the standard input
  • create an array of input records, a structure that contains information about what happens in the conhost window (keyboard, mouse, resize, etc.)
  • read what happens in the window (it can handle the number of events)
  • iterate over the event vector to handle the keyboard event and intercept the required EOF (that is a 4, from what I've tested) for exiting, or prints any other ascii character.

This is the code:

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define Kev input_buffer[i].Event.KeyEvent // a shortcut

int main(void) {
  HANDLE h_std_in;                // Handler for the stdin
  DWORD read_count,               // number of events intercepted by ReadConsoleInput
        i;                        // iterator
  INPUT_RECORD input_buffer[128]; // Vector of events

  h_std_in = GetStdHandle( // Get the stdin handler
    STD_INPUT_HANDLE       // enumerator for stdin. Others exist for stdout and stderr
  ); 

  while(1) {
    ReadConsoleInput( // Read the input from the handler
      h_std_in,       // our handler 
      input_buffer,   // the vector in which events will be saved
      128,            // the dimension of the vector
      &read_count);   // the number of events captured and saved (always < 128 in this case)

    for (i = 0; i < read_count; i++) {    // and here we iterate from 0 to read_count
      switch(input_buffer[i].EventType) { // let's check the type of event 
        case KEY_EVENT:                   // to intercept the keyboard ones
          if (Kev.bKeyDown) {             // and refine only on key pressed (avoid a second event for key released)
            // Intercepts CTRL + D
            if (Kev.uChar.AsciiChar != 4)
              printf("%c", Kev.uChar.AsciiChar);
            else
              return 0;
          }
          break;
        default:
          break;
      }
    }
  }

  return 0;
}
  • thank you, so it will only work on linnux.. – Michael Hübler Oct 26 '17 at 11:09
  • At its core the console has no predetermined control character to indicated a normal return without pressing enter. It's the implementation for ReadFile that returns 0 characters read if a line starts with Ctrl+Z ("\x1a"), and that behavior is also common in the C runtime. The console itself (conhost.exe) has no such behavior, and if you call ReadConsoleW (for Unicode support), you have to manually implement this. That said ReadConsoleW has a better behavior that is exactly what the OP wants -- its pInputControl parameter can implement a Unix-like Ctrl+D. – Eryk Sun Oct 29 '17 at 5:54
  • FYI, there's no CMD window. CMD is a standard I/O application that can use a console (conhost.exe instance), like any other console application. It has the standard handles for the console input and screen buffer and access to the same console API functions (e.g. GetConsoleMode, SetConsoleTitle, etc) as any other Windows application. – Eryk Sun Oct 29 '17 at 6:02
  • Thank you I've updated the answer following your advises, and I got a "exit on EOF"... It is awful (mainly because I never cared about using winapi before, and I'm evidently not good at), but I don't want to spend too much time on that. Moreover, I understand what you are saying by "there is no cmd window". For me C:\Windows\system32\cmd.exe IS the command window. The fact that uses conhost and windows API does not change the fact that it is the CMD by default in a common windows installation. – Matteo Ragni Oct 29 '17 at 15:22
  • cmd.exe is not the console and never was in any version of Windows. cmd.exe is no more the console than powershell.exe or python.exe. CMD creates no windows. It doesn't even load user32.dll. It's a simple console client that uses its StandardInput, StandardOutput, and StandardError handles for the console input and screen buffer -- or redirected to pipes, files, NUL, etc. As a console application it also has a connection handle to its attached console, which is the ConsoleHandle in the PEB ProcessParamaters. This handle is used implicitly by many console functions. – Eryk Sun Oct 31 '17 at 2:40
0
    while(getchar() != EOF)
    {
        if( getchar() == EOF )
            break;
    }
    return 0;

Here it is inconsistent.

If getchar() != EOF it will enter the loop, otherwise (if getchar() == EOF) it will not enter the loop. So, there is no reason to check getchar() == EOF inside the loop.

On the other hand, you call getchar() 2 times, you wait to enter 2 characters instead of only 1.

What did you try to do ?

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