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I'm curious to see what everyone thinks.

The idea is to store the one-way encrypted username in one database secured by one connection then the coresponding one-way encrypted password in another database with a different . They could be seperate servers, but I don't think it would be neccessary. The result would be that if an attacker gained access to one database without the other the information would be useless. Then the application that uses the information would only check for matching hashed user credentials and that an indexing column matched.

I realize there might be some performance issues, but my thought is that they would be minimal. To me this would be the most secure the user information could be.

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    You hash your usernames? – Thomas Jan 14 '11 at 20:38
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    There is no point putting a safe door on a tent. make sure whatever you are doing is appropriate for the system you are attempting to secure! – time4tea Jan 14 '11 at 20:40
  • You should consider what methods of compromise would allow compromising one database but not the other. If the answer is "not many", then you aren't gaining any security. You may also want to consider having one very secure database that just handles authentication (e.g., connected only over a serial link with a simple protocol) – derobert Jan 14 '11 at 20:41
  • Lets just say we are talking about financial information that is required to be stored. Like the username and password to an online banking site. It's not but if the information what if the information were that important. – Andy J Jan 14 '11 at 20:46
  • If its that kind of thing i would forget about all that stuff and use cleartrust or something similar (it might have been renamed since i last used it) – time4tea Jan 14 '11 at 20:47
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I'd store passwords in a separate, restricted database. To add to your reasons, list of users, groups and some other settings could be public while passwords, even though encrypted, should be well protected. For example, UNIX-like systems usually store user-specific information (such as user ID, group ID, shell etc). in publicly available place. However, MD5 hashes of passwords are hidden from everyone. Before they used to be available, but that is a great security risk these times because decoding MD5 is now possible by using brute-force.

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  • This is why MD5 hashing should not be used anymore (and has been replaced by other methods such as bcrypt). See Enough With The Rainbow Tables: What You Need To Know About Secure Password Schemes. While I can't fault (and gave +1 for) using a separate (transparently-encrypted/restricted) database, perhaps on the same server, I think the following is a very good summary of handling passwords in general "No, really. Use someone else’s password system. Don’t build your own." – user166390 Jan 14 '11 at 21:04
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From my limited knowledge... I would guess anything after hashing both the username and password would be overkill and that you are pretty good from there.

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Interesting concept, although every system I have worked with has handled both in a single schema, same table even. Really it is possible, but not necessary like you mentioned.

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