1

The following code is very confusing to me.

public class Test<T> {
  public static <T> Test<T> ok(T result) {
  ..

I understand the generics in class name. I could understand if "ok" method would be like this

public static Test<T> ok(T result) {

or this

public static T ok(T result) {

But why there is the extra < T > before the Test < T > return type I don't understand.

3
  • So does it return Test<T> or <T> It has "two" return types.. If it returns Test<T> why it has extra <T> before it. If it returns just T why it isn't just T without <> and without Test<T>
    – luky
    Oct 26, 2017 at 14:17
  • It´s there because compiler now know it has a generic type. and other Ts are just for filling it for normal form.
    – LenglBoy
    Oct 26, 2017 at 14:18
  • The crucial thing is that the <T> in front of ok is a different T than the one in the class declaration (class Test<T>). You have two entirely different type parameters, though both have the same name. The one from the class declaration is only available in instance methods, and the one on ok is only available there. (T result uses the one declared for ok, not Test<T>).
    – yshavit
    Oct 26, 2017 at 14:21

2 Answers 2

5

The example is in fact equivalent to

public class Test<T> {
  public static <U> Test<U> ok(U result) {
  ..

The other <T> refers to a different generic type which applies only to the method. To avoid confusion, it's better to use different names for different things.

9
  • if it returns U why the method isnt just public static <U> ok(U result); or public static U ok(U result); (i guess first option makes more sense because the brackets probably highlights it is related to U as parameter of ok method, but anyway why there is also the Test<U> then if it returns U?
    – luky
    Oct 26, 2017 at 14:28
  • 1
    The first <U> introduces a new generic type variable, unrelated to <T>. From the perspective of compiler, you then have two and can use either <T> or <U> in the method. If you want to have just one, omit the extra <U> and use <T> from the class level.
    – jurez
    Oct 26, 2017 at 14:31
  • 1
    @jurez Maybe you made a mistake here: In the static method you cannot use the generic from the instance, as there is no instance present.
    – Vlasec
    Oct 26, 2017 at 14:33
  • 1
    @jurez Well, maybe I wasn't clear enough and you clearly didn't get what i wanted to say. The concrete type provided to the generic parameter is what is tied to the instance. Where you were wrong is, you told OP that he could use T in the static method which is wrong, as it is not visible there in a static method.
    – Vlasec
    Oct 26, 2017 at 15:10
  • 1
    @Vlasec Thanks for clarification, you are correct. You cannot use type parameter declared on class level on static methods, you can only use it on instance methods. So static Test<T> test(T ok) will not compile.
    – jurez
    Oct 26, 2017 at 15:30
2

It is a static method, so it is unaffected by the generic type parameter of an instance.

If you want the ok method to be bound by the generic parameter , you will have to make something like TestFactory<T> class as a factory that only makes tests of T type, like that:

public class TestFactory<T> {
    public Test<T> ok(T result) {
        // ...
    }
}

So in this case a TestFactory<String> only allows String results, anything else is a compiler error.

If you prefer the static method, you should do what @jurez posted to avoid confusion: The thing is, its type parameter of this static method only depends on type of given input parameter.

1
  • 1
    No problem, I updated it a bit, too. Originally I also wanted to point out what @jurez wrote, but he was faster and I don't like "stealing" :)
    – Vlasec
    Oct 26, 2017 at 14:45

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