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This question already has an answer here:

For map/lambda expression with array a = [1, 2, 3, 4]:

f = map(lambda x : x + 32, a)

Seems I can simplify write as:

f = [x + 32 for x in a]

I am wondering whether there is any difference.

marked as duplicate by cs95 python Oct 26 '17 at 17:02

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  • if the final goal is to obtain a list with modified values, then there would some speed difference (the 1st case would be list(map(lambda x : x + 32, a))) – RomanPerekhrest Oct 26 '17 at 16:53
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    Performance comparison – Miraj50 Oct 26 '17 at 16:54
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    BTW, this has nothing to do with mapreduce.... – juanpa.arrivillaga Oct 26 '17 at 17:32
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lambda tends to be slower cause of the function's overhead. Also lambdas tend to make code more difficult to read. You can also time it:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import time

a = [1, 2, 3, 4]

t1 = time.time()
f = map(lambda x : x + 32, a)
t2 = time.time()-t1
print t2

t3 = time.time()
g = [x + 32 for x in a]
t4 = time.time()-t3
print t4

This code returned:

7.86781311035e-06
2.14576721191e-06

Also I tried the same thing for larger lists and the time taken is almost double for lambda expression.

python -m timeit '[x + 32 for x in range(100000)]'

>> 100 loops, best of 3: 6.67 msec per loop

python -m timeit 'map(lambda x : x + 32, range(100000))'

>> 100 loops, best of 3: 12.5 msec per loop

which is huge difference in performance.

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    @KeerthanaPrabhakaran performance is always a big thing to consider. See the metrics above, I like lambdas too but they tend to be slow. – frank Oct 26 '17 at 16:57
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    @KeerthanaPrabhakaran What is more Pythonic than a list comprehension? And "Readability counts" - a lot! – schwobaseggl Oct 26 '17 at 17:01
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    @KeerthanaPrabhakaran but a lambda doesn't divide code into functions, it uses an anonymous function. – juanpa.arrivillaga Oct 26 '17 at 17:04
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    Is it slow ? My test showed otherwise [prateek@localhost pythonista]$ python -mtimeit -s'a=[1,2,3,4]' 'map(lambda x:x+2,a)' 1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.189 usec per loop [prateek@localhost pythonista]$ python -mtimeit -s'a=[1,2,3,4]' '[x + 32 for x in a]' 1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.291 usec per loop [prateek@localhost pythonista] – The_Lost_Avatar Oct 26 '17 at 17:09
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    @KeerthanaPrabhakaran One can ease one's life (and that of one's co-coders) living by simple rules. Not cluttering a codebase with lambda-contaminated map and filter expressions is one of them ;) – schwobaseggl Oct 26 '17 at 17:18

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