1

this is my small sample .. i have a language and on parsing i have something like

 foo()
 nextfoo()  <-- here an error appears because of the keyword "next" 

so the grammer

 typedef boost::proto::result_of::deep_copy<BOOST_TYPEOF(ascii::no_caseqi::lit(std::wstring())])>::type nocaselit_return_type;

   nocaselit_return_type nocaselit(const std::wstring& keyword)
   {
     return boost::proto::deep_copy(ascii::no_case[qi::lit(keyword)]);
   }


keywords = nocaselit(L"next")
    | nocaselit(L"else")
    | nocaselit(L"if")
    | nocaselit(L"then")
    | nocaselit(L"for")
    | nocaselit(L"to")
    | nocaselit(L"dim")
    | nocaselit(L"true")
    | nocaselit(L"false")
    | nocaselit(L"as")
    | nocaselit(L"class")
    | nocaselit(L"end")
    | nocaselit(L"function")
    | nocaselit(L"new")
    | nocaselit(L"sub");


  name_valid =   !keywords>> lexeme[+(boost::spirit::standard_wide::alpha | '_') >> *(boost::spirit::standard_wide::alnum | '_')];

i learned from docu and goolge that i have to write something like this one to make the parser work correct with keywords

 name_valid =   distinct(Keywords)[ lexeme[+(boost::spirit::standard_wide::alpha | '_') >> *(boost::spirit::standard_wide::alnum | '_')] ];

but this don´t work .. can sombody explain me why ?

Special question .. as Long as i use the Syntax above i get an template compiler error the work sample must be written as the following (the Keywords list is inline instead a rule). I assume that this has someting to do with the type spec of the rule .. but what is the correct one ?

 name_valid =   distinct(nocaselit(L"next")| nocaselit(L"else") | ... )
 [ lexeme[+(boost::spirit::standard_wide::alpha | '_') >> *(boost

thank you

  • 1
    how did you define nocaselit? This is not something I've see before. – sehe Oct 26 '17 at 17:48
  • put nocaselit in text .. – Markus Oct 26 '17 at 19:12
1

The distinct directive takes the subject parser inside the [] block instead of the(). Inside the () specify the exclusion to disallow at the boundary (most often a character set comprising identifier characters).

Also consider using qi::symbol which works well with qi::no_case but uses a Trie internally which removes the need for any backtracking.

When I'm close to computer I'll provide a working example. Meanwhile feel free to look here for existing examples: How to parse reserved words correctly in boost spirit

Demo

Live On Coliru

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/repository/include/qi_distinct.hpp>
namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;
namespace qr = boost::spirit::repository::qi;
namespace enc = boost::spirit::standard_wide;

template <typename It>
struct Grammar : qi::grammar<It> {

    Grammar() : Grammar::base_type(start) {
        using namespace qi;
        auto kw = qr::distinct(copy(enc::alnum | L'_'));

        start         = skip(enc::space) [function_call];
        function_call = identifier >> L'(' >> L')';
        identifier    = !keyword >> raw[(enc::alpha|L'_') >> *(enc::alnum|L'_')];

        keyword       = kw[ no_case[keywords] ];
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODES((start)(function_call)(identifier)(keyword));
    }
  private:
    qi::rule<It> start;
    qi::rule<It, enc::space_type> function_call;

    // implicit lexemes
    struct keywords_t : qi::symbols<wchar_t> {
        keywords_t() { 
            this->add
                (L"as")(L"class")(L"dim")(L"else")(L"end")(L"false")
                (L"for")(L"function")(L"if")(L"new")(L"next")(L"sub")
                (L"then")(L"to")(L"true");
        }
    } keywords;
    qi::rule<It, std::string()> identifier, keyword;
};

int main() {
    using It = std::wstring::const_iterator;
    Grammar<It> const g;

    for (std::wstring input : {
            L"foo()",
            L"nextfoo()",
        })
    {
        It f=input.begin(), l=input.end();
        if (parse(f, l, g)) {
            std::wcout << L"Parse success\n";
        } else {
            std::wcout << L"Parse failed\n";
        }

        if (f!=l) {
            std::wcout << L"Remaining unparsed input: '" << std::wstring(f,l) << L"\n";
        }
    }
}

Prints

Parse success
Parse success

As expected

  • Added a working sample Live On Coliru – sehe Oct 26 '17 at 21:33
  • your sample works .. anyway i don´t understand exact why my very first Version also with "!Keywords" does´t do the same job – Markus Oct 27 '17 at 5:19
  • You first version using !keywords doesn't use distinct, does (see kw()). To understand it, understand that PEG rules are greedy, always accepting the first match (and longest if applicable). intfoo does match int (leaving foo). – sehe Oct 27 '17 at 10:14

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