267

I am writing my first Razor page today, and can't figure out how to enter

#if debug
...
#else
...
#endif

How can I do that in Razor?

2
  • possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/378982/… Commented Jan 14, 2011 at 21:46
  • 11
    My point is that you want #if debug in razor but it will always be true. So the answer to your question is that there's no point in doing it as Razor will always compile in debug mode. Commented Jan 18, 2011 at 21:09

11 Answers 11

412

I just created an extension method:

public static bool IsDebug(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper)
{
#if DEBUG
      return true;
#else
      return false;
#endif
}

Then used it in my views like so:

<section id="sidebar">
     @Html.Partial("_Connect")
     @if (!Html.IsDebug())
     { 
         @Html.Partial("_Ads")
     }
     <hr />
     @RenderSection("Sidebar", required: false)
</section>

Since the helper is compiled with the DEBUG/RELEASE symbol, it works.

4
  • 36
    Of course this extension method has to go into the MVC project, not into a separate library that might be compiled with different options...
    – Eric J.
    Commented Jul 27, 2012 at 1:19
  • 3
    This didn't work for me at all- it produced "True" regardless of compilation mode. Jordan Gray's answer worked perfectly. Commented Feb 9, 2017 at 16:14
  • If it's DEBUG mode, the pre-processor will essentially read public static bool IsDebug(...){ return true; }, and vice versa for non DEBUG mode.
    – mekb
    Commented Aug 7, 2019 at 9:46
  • 1
    This worked for me with a slight tweak for .Net Core: Had to change HtmlHelper to IHtmlHelper. Hope that helps someone.
    – Rob
    Commented Dec 1, 2021 at 14:23
329

This is built in to HttpContext:

@if (HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled)
{
    // Means that debug="true" in Web.config
}

IMO, this makes more sense than conditional compilation for views and comes in handy for some testing scenarios. (See Tony Wall's comment below.)


Side note: NullReferenceException for HttpContext.Current

Alex Angas mentioned that they get a NullReferenceException with this solution, and a few people have upvoted indicating that this may not be an isolated event.

My best guess: HttpContext.Current is stored in CallContext, meaning it is only accessible by the thread that handles the incoming HTTP request. If your views are being rendered on a different thread (perhaps some solutions for precompiled views?) you would get a null value for HttpContext.Current.

If you get this error, please let me know in the comments and mention if you are using precompiled views or anything special set up that could result in your views being partially rendered/executed on another thread!

10
  • 2
    Has the advantage you can switch it on in integration test environments to diagnose deployment issues often not seen until installed on non-developer PCs.
    – Tony Wall
    Commented Jun 3, 2013 at 11:36
  • 2
    I get a null reference exception using this, probably because in Release mode the debug attribute is removed from web.config entirely.
    – Alex Angas
    Commented Feb 27, 2014 at 3:55
  • 1
    @AlexAngas Can't repro. :( I created a project in .NET 4.5.1 (ASP.NET MVC 5, System.Web version 4.0.0.0), and even with the debug attribute (or, indeed, the whole compilation element) removed I don't get an exception. My next best hypotheses are that this is a bug that was fixed in later versions of the System.Web assembly or that there is something different about your specific situation that I'm not aware of. Could you create a minimal test project and upload it somewhere? Commented Mar 11, 2014 at 14:06
  • 4
    @JordanGray Thanks for taking a look - I just tried a new project as well and can't repro either! Your solution is working. No time to look further at the moment unfortunately but if I come across the reason i'll update this post.
    – Alex Angas
    Commented Mar 13, 2014 at 1:07
  • 1
    This solution doesn't answer a qestion How can i enter preprocessor in razor? as it only handles Release/Debug but not any other conditional compilation symbol. For instance QA, Staging, Production, etc.
    – mdonatas
    Commented Sep 29, 2017 at 14:44
26

In .NET Core, you can use the environment tag helper instead of checking the preprocessor variables:

<environment include="Development">
    <!--Debug code here-->
</environment>
1
24

C# and ASP.NET MVC: Using #if directive in a view

Actually that answer has the right answer. You're going to have to pass whether or not you're in debug mode via the Model. (or ViewBag) since all views are compiled in debug mode.

2
  • 27
    Note that because Razor views are always compiled in Debug mode setting a preprocessor directive in this way will not actually have any effect. You will always execute // your debug stuff
    – marcind
    Commented Jan 14, 2011 at 23:07
  • 1
    Heh, yeah, I just realized that when I wrote it. Commented Jan 14, 2011 at 23:07
20

My solution is very stupid, but it works. Define a global constant somewhere in a static file:

public static class AppConstants
{
#if DEBUG
        public const bool IS_DEBUG = true;
#else
        public const bool IS_DEBUG = false;
#endif
}

Then use it with Razor in HTML:

@if (AppConstants.IS_DEBUG)
{
    <h3>Debug mode</h3>
}
else
{
    <h3>Release mode</h3>
}
7
  • imho, it's not that stupid. in debug I want to use the es6-javascript (so I see the es6-errors while developing) and in release I want to use the auto-converted non-es6-javascript (cuz IE11 doesn't know es6). this is a great solution for me. Commented Sep 13, 2019 at 7:52
  • nice one - simple direct, unambiguous
    – Serexx
    Commented Jan 10, 2020 at 17:49
  • Love it...I have a global static class for appSetting...this plugs in nicely. Commented Apr 27, 2021 at 21:11
  • I'm having a problem with this solution where it works in a Debug build, but get "AppConstants doesn't exist in this context" in a Release build. Any ideas?
    – Greg Barth
    Commented Sep 2, 2021 at 14:00
  • My guess is that you deleted the reference "@using ..." in the Razor page (relative to AppConstants namespace). Or you could have put under "#if DEBUG" the whole AppConstants declaration.
    – tedebus
    Commented Sep 2, 2021 at 15:03
15

I know this is not a direct answer to the question but as I'm pretty sure debug configuration is corollary to the fact that you are actually executing locally, you can always use the Request.IsLocal property as a debug like test. Thus :

@if (Request.IsLocal)
{
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="~/css/compiled/complete.css">
}
else
{
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="~/css/compiled/complete.min.css">
}
2
  • 1
    Not necessarily. You might run in Debug mode on a test/development server, for example, before compiling in Release mode on Staging/Production.
    – jonnybot
    Commented Apr 22, 2016 at 15:42
  • An html helper extension method to render the link tag will help in this case. Inside the extension method you can either use #if DEBUG or a config variable to decide the environment.
    – sree
    Commented Nov 24, 2016 at 3:15
14

This works for me in a .NET Core 3.0 white label project:

@{
#if CORPA
}
    <button type="button" class="btn btn-warning">A Button</button>
@{
#else
}
    <p>Nothing to see here</p>
@{
#endif
}
1
  • 1
    This works in Blazor components as well (at least in Blazor 7)
    – MikeT
    Commented Jan 22, 2023 at 6:53
5

By default MVC views are not compiled so #IF DEBUG can't work in a view. If you want to compile view in order to access IF DEBUG config, you need to :

  1. Right click on your project in Visual Studio
  2. Unload project
  3. Edit project

change the following attribute from false to true

<MvcBuildViews>true</MvcBuildViews>

reload your project and then views are going to be compiled.

The only other work around would be to have a function in your code behind

public static Boolean DEBUG(this System.Web.Mvc.WebViewPage page)
{
   var value = false;
   #if(DEBUG)
       value=true;
   #endif
   return value;
}

and then call it from view :

if(DEBUG())
{
  //debug code here
}
else
{
  //release code here
}
5

For me, the code below has worked very well.

When the application is Debugging my buttons appear, when is Release, they don't.

@if (this.Context.IsDebuggingEnabled)
{
    <button type="button" class="btn btn-warning">Fill file</button>
    <button type="button" class="btn btn-info">Export file</button>
} 
0
3

I needed something similar that works in the <script> tag as well, and found that the following works well for either conditional markup in the DOM, or a conditional script.

@{
#if NOEXTAUTH
{
    @:<!-- A single line of code -->

    <text>
        <!--
        A multi-line block    
        -->
    </text>
}
#endif
}
3
  • 2
    All other answers completely missed the point. In every other answer there is STILL an “if” which will go in release and will be executed. This one is the best answer.
    – Jurion
    Commented May 27, 2021 at 22:36
  • Where do you define NOEXTAUTH? I tried doing something similar. I tried to do something similar and I set the constant in the Build tab of the project properties but the constant is visible only in cs files or when using the RazorGenerator tool. I suppose it is because Razor compiles only at runtime and it has no way of knowing what was defined at build time? How do YOU use it? Thanks! (Note: I'm in .NET Framework 4.8)
    – bkqc
    Commented Aug 28, 2023 at 15:07
  • NOEXTAUTH is just a solution configuration we added alongside Debug and Release. This example could equally just be #if DEBUG for example.
    – Mr Moose
    Commented Sep 1, 2023 at 3:02
2

The simplest solution as far as I know is this:

@{
#if DEBUG
}
<div id="blazor-error-ui">
   <environment include="Staging,Production">
    An error has occurred. This application may no longer respond until reloaded.
   </environment>
   <environment include="Development">
    An unhandled exception has occurred. See browser dev tools for details.
   </environment>
   <a href="" class="reload">Reload</a>
   <a class="dismiss">🗙</a>
</div>
@{
#endif
}

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