What I'm trying to achieve is to add a TrimBox to a number of existing PDF documents. I'd like to use Perl for this task.

I already researched and tried a number of approaches, but without success. I'm happy about suggestions for driving any of these approaches further:

1) PDF::API2
This one looked very promising for the start, and I managed to add TrimBoxes programmatically with an approach like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use PDF::API2;

my $pdfsource = "test.pdf";
my $pdftarget = "output.pdf"
my $pdf = PDF::API2->open($pdfsource);
my $page = $pdf->openpage(1);
$page->trimbox(255, 9, 1042, 536);
$pdf->saveas($pdftarget);

This code works perfectly fine for quite some PDFs, but unfortunately corrupts approx. ~25% of the PDF files. When trying to open the output files in Acrobat reader, I get "An error exists on this page. Acrobat may not display the page correctly."

The very same problem occurs if I just open and save the PDF using PDF::API2 without any modification:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use PDF::API2;

my $pdfsource = "test.pdf";
my $pdftarget = "output.pdf"
my $pdf = PDF::API2->open($pdfsource);
$pdf->saveas($pdftarget);

Any hint how to avoid or further diagnose this behavior of PDF::API2, only affecting some PDFs, would be highly welcome, since this library is most convenient to use.

2) Directly changing the file on raw level
My next idea was: I want to change the values of only one existing object in the PDF. Probably PDF::API2 does too much and rewrites the entire file, this breaking it. So why not keep my access as minimal as possible, just read the file line by line in Perl and substitute the specific value I'd like to change?

This was the dirty piece of code I wrote for that (please don't laugh):

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $pdfsource = "test.pdf";
my $pdftarget = "output.pdf";
open my $fh, '<', $pdfsource or die;
binmode($fh);
open my $fho, '>', $pdftarget or die;
binmode($fho);
my $line = undef;

while(<$fh>) {
    if ($_ =~ /\/TrimBox/) {
        $line = $_;
        my $index = index($line, "/TrimBox");
        my @parts = split /\/TrimBox/, $line;
        $parts[0] = $parts[0] . "/Trimbox";
        $parts[1] =~ s/0 0 1296 864/255 9 1042 536/;
        $line = $parts[0] . $parts[1];
        print $fho $line;
    } else {
       print $fho $_;
}   
}
close $fh;
close $fho;

Unfortunately, this approach corrupts all output files - so either there's a mistake in the code, or PDFs are somehow checksum-protected against changes like this one.

3) CAM::PDF
I then researched CAM::PDF, because I was searching for an option to manipulate a specific object in the PDF without having to work on raw level. Unfortunately, this model isn't documented too deeply, why I only managed to read the existing TrimBox node from my PDF file, but found no way to update the node with the values I need.

If you believe this approach could work, I'd be grateful for an example showing how to effectively pull a specific node and to alter its values.

Of course, any other idea how the objective could be achieved, apart from any of these approaches, is also highly welcome. Thanks much!

  • Are you reasoably up-to-date with PDF::API2? (perl -MPDF::API2 -E'say $PDF::API2::VERSION'). Latest is 2.033 – dwarring Oct 26 '17 at 23:42
  • My version actually is 2.033. – Bastian Oct 27 '17 at 7:51
  • Can you show your code for option three, and provide an example PDF? I worked a lot with PDFs in Perl in the past, but don't remember a lot any more. I'd like to play around with your stuff. Maybe I'll get lucky. – simbabque Oct 27 '17 at 14:43

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