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So I've got a situation where several sprints ago we had a bad set of check-in's from another team. Why they have access to our code, is something else I'll be looking into BUT what I have to do now is remove their changes. They were at least named well so I know which ones they were. The approach I'm considering is to rewind back to just before and then merge everything going forward EXCEPT those changes. Is there a better approach? Is there a way I can specify a range of changes or is there a way to do an exclude?

  • No sure is your looking for stackoverflow.com/questions/6294355/… for exclude way add to ignore git file to no been staged or merged the next time. – user8556290 Oct 27 '17 at 15:40
  • Sounds like a good solution to me. Though I would suggest git rebase rather than git merge after you've rewound. There are variants of git rebase that will probably do all of what you want too without having to do the initial rewind, but just add extra complexity for no real benefit. – Mort Oct 27 '17 at 15:47
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The approach I'm considering is to rewind back to just before and then merge everything going forward EXCEPT those changes.

Except if I really don't understand what you plan to do, no that's not possible with git to do a partial merge.

Is there a better approach? Is there a way I can specify a range of changes or is there a way to do an exclude?

With git, there is often multiple possibilities:

  1. Directly on the branch containing the bad commits, use the command git revert on each commit starting from the more recent (creating a revert commit each time or one for all the commits reverted).

1bis. Better, You could, revert à range of commits:

https://stackoverflow.com/a/4992711/717372

It could work quite well if you don't have conflicts because files changed have not been changed since then.

If you have conflicts, you could try :

2.

  • create a branch called something like 'revert-bad-commits' on the last bad commit.
  • create one or more revert commits like described in the solution 1. (you won't have conflicts in this case!)
  • merge this new branch into your branch (you will surely have conflicts but their is a probability that they will be easier to solve, and in one time)
  • I still haven't be authorized to do the fix. :-( – user447607 Dec 28 '17 at 21:08

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