7

I have a list with millions of numbers which are always increasing to the end, I need to find and return numbers within a specified range e.g. numbers greater than X but less than Y, the numbers in the list can change and the values I'm searching for change as well

I have been using this method, please note this is a basic example the numbers are not uniform or the same as shown below in my program

l = [i for i in range(2000000)]
nums = []
for element in l:
    if element > 950004:
        break
    if element > 950000:
        nums.append(element)
#[950001, 950002, 950003, 950004]

Although fast, I kind of need it to be a bit faster for what my program is doing, the numbers change a lot so I'm wondering if there's a better way to do this with a pandas series or a numpy array? but so far all I've done is make an example in numpy:

a = numpy.array(l,dtype=numpy.int64)

Would a pandas series be more functional? Making use of query()? what would be the best way to approach this with an array as opposed to a python list of python objects

10
  • Are you trying to filter your list to numbers between a set of values?
    – James
    Oct 27, 2017 at 16:56
  • no, sorry, return values between x and y
    – ragardner
    Oct 27, 2017 at 16:57
  • it seems that you're just trying to extract a slice from 950000 to 950004. What is the point? Oct 27, 2017 at 17:01
  • 1
    Maybe, searching for the indices of the range-bounds with binary search would make it faster.
    – Calculator
    Oct 27, 2017 at 17:03
  • Could you update your example to be closer to your actual problem?
    – James
    Oct 27, 2017 at 17:04

3 Answers 3

12

Here is a solution using binary search. You are speaking of millions of numbers. Technically binary search will make the algorithm faster by decreasing the runtime complexity to O(log n) neglecting the final slicing step.

import bisect

l = [i for i in range(2000000)]
lower_bound = 950000
upper_bound = 950004

lower_bound_i = bisect.bisect_left(l, lower_bound)
upper_bound_i = bisect.bisect_right(l, upper_bound, lo=lower_bound_i)
nums = l[lower_bound_i:upper_bound_i]
4
  • somehow it's slightly quicker than the numpy boolean slice O_o;
    – ragardner
    Oct 27, 2017 at 17:25
  • thank you, I would probably not have found this solution browsing the docs
    – ragardner
    Oct 27, 2017 at 17:29
  • 4
    This can be made even more efficient by using a lo=lower_bound_i argument in bisect.bisect_right.
    – ekhumoro
    Oct 27, 2017 at 17:30
  • 1
    @new_to_coding this list-slice, you mean? Yeah, a boolean slice creates a whole boolean array the size of your current array. A Python list-slice is extremely fast and efficient, implemented in C. Oct 27, 2017 at 17:30
3

The following are two implementations for binary search (based on code from here) - one which searches for an upper limit and one which searches for a lower limit. Does this work better for you?

def binary_search_upper(seq, limit):
    min = 0
    max = len(seq) - 1
    while True:
        if max < min:
            return -1
        m = (min + max) / 2
        if m == (len(seq) -1) or (seq[m] <= limit and seq[m+1] > limit):
            return m
        elif seq[m] < limit:
            min = m+1
        else:
            max = m - 1

def binary_search_lower(seq, limit):
    min = 0
    max = len(seq) - 1
    while True:
        if max < min:
            return -1
        m = (min + max) / 2
        if m == 0 or (seq[m] >= limit and seq[m-1] < limit):
            return m
        elif seq[m] < limit:
            min = m+1
        else:
            max = m - 1


l = [i for i in range(2000000)]
print binary_search_upper(l, 950004)
print binary_search_lower(l, 950000)
5
  • Why would you use this recipe, which is over 14 years old, and not the standard-library implementation (which will have much, much better constant factors)? Oct 27, 2017 at 17:33
  • JFTR, this is about ten times slower than bisect.
    – ekhumoro
    Oct 27, 2017 at 17:44
  • @ekhumoro interesting, where can I learn more about how bisect is so fast? Oct 27, 2017 at 17:47
  • 3
    @MaorVeitsman. The source code for the module shows a pure python implementation, but the real implementation is written in C.
    – ekhumoro
    Oct 27, 2017 at 17:54
  • @MaorVeitsman. PS: the pure python bisect implementation is about twice as fast as yours :P
    – ekhumoro
    Oct 27, 2017 at 17:58
1

You could use numpy to get a subset of your list using a boolean slice.

import numpy as np
a = np.arange(2000000)
nums = a[(950000<a) & (a<=950004)]
nums
# returns
array([950001, 950002, 950003, 950004])
2
  • the numbers are not the same in my program, this is a basic example, sorry
    – ragardner
    Oct 27, 2017 at 16:54
  • 1
    This takes all the numbers in the entire array, and does not exit after hitting the stop condition. Oct 27, 2017 at 17:09

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