Is there a more elegant way of achieving this via CSS? The idea is to shape text like an Arc.

Thanks!

#p1 {
  text-indent: 0;
}
#p2 {
  text-indent: 10px;
}
#p3 {
  text-indent: 20px;
}
#p4 {
  text-indent: 30px;
}
#p5 {
  text-indent: 40px;
}
#p6 {
  text-indent: 30px;
}
#p7 {
  text-indent: 20px;
}
#p8 {
  text-indent: 10px;
}
#p9 {
  text-indent: 0px;
}
<p id="p1">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p2">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p3">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p4">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p5">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p6">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p7">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p8">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p9">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>

  • Your example shows more a triangular shape than an arc, so I would go with caramba's solution (nested margin) that should work across all browsers, Dale's solution is very nice if you want really achieve arc and you get much cleaner html, but you'll have to bother with FF not mentioning IE/Edge – bohuss Nov 6 '17 at 13:41
up vote 17 down vote accepted

If you want a perfect arc you can use shape-outside to create a circle or ellipse that the text will follow.

You can see how this works circle

However support is spotty to say the least.

div{
    shape-outside: circle(50%);
    width: 140px;
    height: 140px;
    float: left;
 }
  
<div></div>
<span>
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
</span>

  • 2
    That's awesome, however, it's not supported on EDGE, IE, Firefox and Opera. :/ caniuse.com/#search=shape-outside – odedta Oct 27 '17 at 19:26
  • That's true, I just finished updating my answer to say as much. @odedta – Dale Oct 27 '17 at 19:27
  • Yeah, well, that deserves an up-vote nevertheless! thanks :-) – odedta Oct 27 '17 at 19:29
  • 4
    Here's a polyfill: github.com/adobe-webplatform/css-shapes-polyfill – tobiv Oct 27 '17 at 19:30
  • I have to accept this answer in the lack of a better supported answer. Thank you very much Dale! – odedta Nov 6 '17 at 18:17

You can achieve the same result with one class and one rule on that class. The trick is to repeat the elements inside each other:

.blubb {
  margin: 5px 0 5px 10px;
}
<div class="blubb">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
  <div class="blubb">
    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
      <div class="blubb">
        Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
          <div class="blubb">
            Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
            <div class="blubb">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</div>
          </div>
          <div class="blubb">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</div>
      </div>
      <div class="blubb">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</div>
  </div>
  <div class="blubb">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</div>
</div>
<div class="blubb">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</div>

  • 1
    Hah, neat! that's a nice way :-) – odedta Oct 27 '17 at 18:58
  • How would you go about making an Arc? thanks. – odedta Oct 27 '17 at 19:57
  • @odedta what do you mean? what should be different? – caramba Oct 29 '17 at 7:16

As Dale said, use shape-outside for a pure css solution. However due to browser support we have to find a lower-level solution.

Contains comments for non-jQuery solution, code contains jQuery.

var ps = 9;//paragraphs
var i = 1;//start id
var x = 0;//left position
var amount = 50;
for(i=1;i<ps;i++){
 //calculate left position in arc
  //(i/ps) gets value between 0 and 1, Math.PI is to make it radians for sine, *amount is max indent
  //bearing in mind this bit can be changed to give more desired effect.
  x = Math.sin(((i-1)/(ps-1))*Math.PI)*amount;
  
  //get element using jquery and set its text-indent to x
  //otherwise you could use document.getElementById('p'+i); and textIndent JS property if you dont want jQuery.
  $('#p'+i).css('text-indent', x+'px');
 
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<p id="p1">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p2">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p3">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p4">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p5">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p6">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p7">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p8">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
<p id="p9">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>

  • Great answer! thank you :-) – odedta Nov 7 '17 at 11:14

You may try using skew transformation. You put the p inside a div, you skew the div and then the p in the opposite way. Using skew on div will result on this shape:

enter image description here

As you may notice, the text will not behave good, so you have to do the skew of p in the other direction.

Then you do the same with the second part by inverting the values.

.first {
  transform: skew(30deg);
  transform-origin: top right;
}

.first p {
  transform: skew(-30deg);
}
.second {
  transform: skew(-30deg);
  transform-origin: bottom right;
}

.second p {
  transform: skew(30deg);
}
<div class="first">
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
</div>
<div class="second">
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</p>
</div>

  • How would you go about shaping this more into an Arc? could you explain how that CSS work? I never considered using skew this way. – odedta Oct 27 '17 at 19:52
  • @odedta yes of course, am gonna add more detail to my answer ;) – Temani Afif Oct 27 '17 at 20:10
  • @odedta i updated my anwser, hope it's more clear ... for the arc you mean you want it to be rounded like the solution of Dale ? – Temani Afif Oct 27 '17 at 20:20
  • Yes, that was the question on my post. – odedta Oct 28 '17 at 17:59

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.